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Looking For Information On The Wearever Brand

wearever history wearever brand cheap vintage pens wearever

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5 replies to this topic

#1 Gloucesterman

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 01:12

I've started to acquire and restore some Wearever pens. with a minimum of work I figure people can get the feel of a vintage pen for $15 or $20 or so. (Esterbrooks, although also excellent pens are getting pretty pricy for anything in decent condition.)

 

They clean up and write quite nicely. I did find one pen whose nib was labelled as "flex", although it was definitely on the stiff side of flex!

 

Some of the ones I have are in mint condition as they were part of a salesman's sample kit. One is a mini-combo that is really cute and works very well. the sac is still pliable and because it's a mini I can use it for a day or so, use up the ink load, flush to clean and refill with another color.

 

I would like to learn more about these pens and the manufacturer, beyond simply that they were a cheap pen and prone to be thrown away rather than repaired.

 

Does anyone have any suggestion about where to find that history or even people to speak with about the Wearever brand. There was one link in another post (weareverpens.com - I think) but clicking on it simple took me to Verizon page with no current site link.

 

Any help or suggestions are very much appreciated.

 

Thanks to all.


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#2 gweimer1

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 01:23

I just got a few myself, for practice, and they can really write smooth at times.  This is where I went to figure out what I had.

 

http://www.penhero.c...er/Wearever.htm



#3 FarmBoy

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 02:29

I don't know if DWL is still around but he amassed a very respectable accumulation of Wearever products.  You might seek him out. 

 

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#4 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 12:56

I believe DWL got very sick and had to sell all his pens in bulk at a loss.Breathing from an air tank.

I don't know if his site is still running.

That had lots of info.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 10 November 2014 - 12:57.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#5 Paddler

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 14:00

I've started to acquire and restore some Wearever pens. with a minimum of work I figure people can get the feel of a vintage pen for $15 or $20 or so. (Esterbrooks, although also excellent pens are getting pretty pricy for anything in decent condition.)

 

They clean up and write quite nicely. I did find one pen whose nib was labelled as "flex", although it was definitely on the stiff side of flex!

 

 

I have a Wearever "Pennant" with a nib marked "Flexfine". It is very flexible until it reaches the limit set by the overfeed; then it becomes a nail. The flexible range is very small and the line variation is usable but limited.


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#6 Gloucesterman

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 17:34

I just got a few myself, for practice, and they can really write smooth at times.  This is where I went to figure out what I had.

 

http://www.penhero.c...er/Wearever.htm

 

Thank you for the link. :thumbup:

This is a good place to start. when I have plumbed all I can from here, I know I'll be looking for more - :) .


“Don't put off till tomorrow what you can do today, because if you do it today and like it, you can do again tomorrow!”






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