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M200 Mold Lines?

pelikan m200 mold lines

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24 replies to this topic

#1 Ergz

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 01:10

Hi all,

 

I am looking for a classic pen for everyday use. Years ago I felt in love with fountain pens with a Parker 21 that I got from my grandfather. Then I had a Parker Sonnet and, after this one I have just been using pens that I never felt that they were "my pen". So I am still looking for a pen that I could consider a 'soulmate', using the word I read in one of this forums days ago, which really represents what I am looking for.

 

Here is the question. My first option was the Pelikan M200. Certainly classic, good size and weight for me, piston filler, changeable nibs, reliable writer... In a couple of posts I read about mild lines.. I did not pay attention just thinking that probably it was not that bad or that they were isolated cases.

 

But today I have just found a picture where one mold line is clearly visible... I am certainly picky enough to be seriously worried about it. I am currently using a Prera and has no line, as my Sonnet did not have... etc. so I was assuming that pens this level were only rarely showing this issues. I was probably wrong.

 

So my questions are...

 

— How serious is this: it has lines all along the barrel? Also in the cap?

— Does the attached picture make it look worse that it really is?

— Is there a safe way to polish or get rid of them?

— What about other similar pens? I am thinking about other pens in my list, such as the Pilot Custom 74, the Kaweco Dia 2 or the Sailor Sapporo...

 

 Thank you very much,

Attached Images

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Edited by zuhandensein, 23 October 2014 - 01:11.

Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


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#2 NedC

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 02:58

Yeah, Pelikan m200s have mould lines. Every 200, 205, and 215 I've seen has mould lines in the section. So do older m400s without the trim ring at the nib end. My Pilot Custom 92 doesn't, nor my Sailor 1911, nor my Platinum 3776s. The lines annoyed me at first but I now see them as part of the pen's charm;)

You can take this observation with however large a quantity of salt you'd like as I am not a materials or production engineer, I studied but didn't major in industrial/product design, painting & drawing major here: The sections on the Pelikans seem to serve a structural function supporting the nib unit and have internal threading, also moulded in as well as a flared end at the nib end whilst the other seamless section I mentioned above do not have these extra demands placed on them or features moulded into them, they are present for aesthetics and comfort only and fitted over a metallic unit that houses the nib and screws into the grip so alternative mould design may be used or the manufactures felt freer to polish out the offending lines without worrying about compromising the sections structural integrity.

#3 Songyi

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Posted 23 October 2014 - 20:09

I think that every M200 (and similar series) that I've own has had mould lines on the section. There are only two and aren't painful to hold but certainly noticeable. If you move up the the Souveran range (i.e. the identically sized M400), you will not see this problem.


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#4 setriode

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 03:21

One doesn't notice them in actual use. The Pilot C74 doesn't have lines and is beautifully finished. The Pilot nibs are spectacular. Each has it's own personality and balance. Both offer excellent value for money.

#5 readonly

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 13:36

Mine has them, but I don't really feel them unless I am conciously trying to. You can probably polish them out if you were really inclined to do so.



#6 sargetalon

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 14:25

They are present on all of my examples but they are not really noticeable unless looking for them.  I do not think that they detract from the pen.


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#7 carlos.q

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 18:29

They are present on all of my examples but they are not really noticeable unless looking for them.  I do not think that they detract from the pen.


+1
I believe the OP has extremely good eyesight. I hadn't noticed this until today!

#8 Ergz

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 22:18

If I am lucky enough in the shops I can visit these days, I will be able to have a look into the M200 this week! I can be picky, certainly. When I buy a pen of this price I expect to be happy using it constantly during many years, because my budget for pens is very limited... Mistakes can be quite dissapointing for me, because I cannot go for another pen immediately. Last time (2-3 years ago) was a Lamy Vista. The pen is ok, but I never got used to it, and now I hardly ever use it... So I learnt that every detail counts...

 

Some pictures seem scary to me (http://ionsomnia.com/pelikan-m215/ :yikes: ), so I am probably a "very (very) detail oriented" person... I acknowledge that It probably looks better on the hand... and that the lines are not very noticeable in general... but I recently bought a Sheaffer Sagaris rollerball with mold lines and I quite like it, but for this reason it does not grow on my hand like the Sonnet, or even the Pilot Prera that I am now using as my first pen.

 

Thanks to you all for your opinions...


Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


#9 TheRealScubaSteve

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 03:42

This is a pen that interests me a lot and I've never noticed the mold lines, either. After seeing those pictures (they make me cringe), I'd have to see one in person to decide if it'd be bothersome enough. I suspect that closeup photos make them much worse than in person.



#10 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 16:33

I have two M205's and even when I am looking for/feeling for them I can't or feel them. Same with my M150. The 120 Merz & Krell is done a bit differently and I don't believe there is one at all. Of course, the 120 M & K hasn't been made since 1977 or 1978 (I forget which) so you would be looking at something used/previously owned. Mine was NOS/never inked when I bought it, although I didn't get box/papers with it. Those would be a little harder to find. (slightly shorter unposted than the modern M2xx pens/slightly longer capped as the cap is longer.)


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#11 Matlock

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 17:21

This is a pen that interests me a lot and I've never noticed the mold lines, either. After seeing those pictures (they make me cringe), I'd have to see one in person to decide if it'd be bothersome enough. I suspect that closeup photos make them much worse than in person.

 

I have several M200s and a P200. On the older pens the mold lines are visible and can be felt (just). On the newer pens, including the P200 they are only just visible and cannot be felt. 


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#12 FayeV

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 17:30

I have 4 M20x pens and never noticed the mold lines until I read about them here. Even after this fact has been pointed out, I still don't notice while using these pens and it does not bother me.

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#13 TheRealScubaSteve

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 22:05

 

I have several M200s and a P200. On the older pens the mold lines are visible and can be felt (just). On the newer pens, including the P200 they are only just visible and cannot be felt. 

 

That's good to know. It seems the general consensus is that they are not a problem when writing which is reassuring. 



#14 Ergz

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 21:47

I was finally able to see the pen with my eyes. The general impression is that the pen is good and well made, but the lines are there.

 

If that is a problem or not depend on may factors... and this is something very personal. In my case I probably agree with NecC, understanding that the lines can be seen as part of the charm of the pen. But only now that I know that this pen comes with this little 'issue'. I probably will not be disappointed with it knowing what I am getting

 

If I can see those lines as part of the charm of the pen is because I am looking for a classic pen that is not pretentious, for something that is well made, but at the same time humble. And the M200 fits well in this category.

 

The only questionable point is that if something that costs £120 (with an italic nib) can be considered particularly 'humble'. Unfortunately I am not among this kind of people, and for that price (£90-£120) I still expect a better finish. If I am still considering the purchase is because on the web you can find it much cheaper, around £50, a price which to me seems reasonable. You can get a pilot Prera for £20 —no piston filler and no ink window, but no mould lines (and no black and gold combination, sadly) but otherwise similar quality, on my understanding... Just for a little more the Pilot Custom 74 with a gold nib...

 

Anyhow. My point is that the M200 is a quite nice pen that I will probably buy, but if Pelikan aspires to put their product at certain level these details are not irrelevant, and people that spend a certain sum on money on a pen should be aware of what they are getting.


Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


#15 risingsun

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 00:56

Here's a suggestion... Watch on the 'Bay for a used 1980's or 1990's black/gold M200 with the domed rather than crown-type top finial. They do still have the mold lines (I just checked mine) but they can be had for less money in the black color as they are much more common, you're giving a moderately older, but quite durable piston-fill FP a new lease on life which is unpretentious in itself, and you'll be avoiding that high price tag you're worried about. If you really want the italic nib, you can get a medium or broad ground to suit your needs by a wonderful nibmeister and add some value to the pen (IMHO).

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#16 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 19:01

I've tran-shipped 5 200's and a 215 to a guy in England, in there are many German Idiots who will not ship outside of Germany. I never noticed those lines.

WoW!! :yikes: After 6 years only because I was told about it, I saw those faint lines on my '90's 400. :o :angry:

 

:lticaptd: B) :P No big deal.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 02 November 2014 - 19:05.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#17 carlos.q

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 19:22

I just received a 1980's "West Germany" M400 with a luscious B nib and... and... It has a mold line!!!!!

 

Now I will never know happiness!!!  :rolleyes:



#18 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 19:37

:crybaby: :bawl: The things they hid from us..... :headsmack:

 

Well at least :puddle: :drool: they write well.

 

Carlos..... :gaah: :wallbash: :sick: :sick: and your nib's better than my '90's one.

 

:) two 140's.....500,400n, 400nn...no lines. :thumbup:

 

Got to remember Pelikan went bankrupt in the '80's....so they had to save money somewhere......sigh.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#19 Ergz

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 16:10

I couldn't wait. I decided to buy one new. And I just received it this morning. The pen is wonderful. It's probably the second time in my life that, after buying a pen, I have the feeling that it is the one I need and want.

 

I am surprised reading that people often do not notice these lines. In my opinion they are quite pronounced. On some pens you have to look for them, but in the M200 they are quite marked. You can clearly feel them just sliding slightly your finger over them. 

 

Having said that, in my case the most disappointing impression is not the tactile one, but the visual. In the pen I have received the lines are not on the sides  —which is what I was expecting— but on the front and rear side of the section.

 

It's quite awkward. I made up my mind to have the lines on the sides, but this position looks completely wrong in my opinion. 

Attached Images

  • 15685597256_3d53214e87_o.jpg
  • 15523848588_886414b904_o.jpg

Edited by zuhandensein, 04 November 2014 - 16:10.

Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


#20 risingsun

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 18:57

If the locations of the mold lines relative to the nib are overly objectionable, it is not out of the question that the nib and feed be knocked out of the collar and rotated 90 degrees in the collar when reinstalled. I might suggest using someone who has worked with a Pelikan nib assembly before.  Or, it is even possible to smooth the mold lines and re-polish them, though I personally don't think that is worth the effort on an M200.


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