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Old Pelikan Nibs

pelikan flex semi flex 400 vintage

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11 replies to this topic

#1 FoszFay

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 12:15

Hi all Pelikan enthusiasts,

I keep seeing people recommend older Pelikan pens, specifically 400 models, when people are looking for semi-flexible nibs.

Are all older Pelikan nibs semi-flex? BEcause I have also seen many videos with older Pelikans, and they usually have exotic (OB) flexy nibs.

If anyone has one, please post photos as I am intrigued and am interested in browsing /purchasing one.

Thanks,
Tom.

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#2 brewsky

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 12:56

Most from the 50's, and prior are. I have a 100N from the late 40's in my collection and it is my best flexing nib. Do you have Instagram? I have a very nice video on my page which shows the flexing potential of my pelikan nib.

My next poem will likely be a tortoise 400nn for its nub and stylish looks :).

Long and shirt off it is, you won't be disappointed!

#3 cnjackson

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 16:39

My next poem will likely be a tortoise 400nn for its nub and stylish looks :).
 

 

I'd like to read that poem.



#4 brewsky

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 16:43

 
I'd like to read that poem.



That was a typo. I was typing from my phone and it likes to auto correct pen to "poem"

#5 camoandconcrete

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Posted 21 September 2014 - 16:42

This picture isn't the greatest quality and I'm not very good at writing in cursive with these nibs, but hopefully it'll give you an idea of what to expect. These are the three I have on had at the moment. I would say the CN nib has very little spring, its quite rigid and the line variation only comes from the fact that its an OBB. The 300 is very soft and flexy; same with the 400NN.

IMG_4010_zps772f6c76.jpg


What I'm looking for: Montblanc 132, 235, 422 and 432. Any help would be most appreciated.

#6 FoszFay

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Posted 21 September 2014 - 22:51

This picture isn't the greatest quality and I'm not very good at writing in cursive with these nibs, but hopefully it'll give you an idea of what to expect. These are the three I have on had at the moment. I would say the CN nib has very little spring, its quite rigid and the line variation only comes from the fact that its an OBB. The 300 is very soft and flexy; same with the 400NN.
IMG_4010_zps772f6c76.jpg

Thanks! The flex looks great. I'm unsure if I want a nice narrow nib for the line variation, or a broad, because I've heard they are great, we writers.

Tom.

#7 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 22 September 2014 - 08:38

I have @38-40 100n, with a superflex nib....will spread 5 X a light down stroke, only push it to 4 X, in I don't want to spring the nib.

 

I have a 500( rolled gold cap, and piston cap-400) with flexi/maxi-semi-flex, and a 400nn with the same flex in OF.

Also have a 400n with a semi-flex B, two 140's one with OB, the other a black one in OF...both semi-flex.

A 120 in regular flex.

 

The 140's which have smaller nibs....are all semi-flex, except for the rare D=daur/manifold nib.

 

For the 400-400n-400nn....one went down to the corner pen and stationary shop and decided what nib width and flex one wanted.

In that the nib flex is not marked it is a gamble on what nib flex those pens had. It was what the original owner wanted, so the nib was swapped in at the shop.

 

If you mash a true regular flex hard, it will give you 3 X a light down stroke.

Semi-flex is more a springy ++ nib, that will give you that 3X with half the pressure of a hard mashed true regular flex.

'Flexi'/maxi-semi-flex spreads it's tines 3 X with half the pressure of a semi-flex or 1/4th of regular flex.

These nibs are not "Flex" nibs, all three, are in the same tine spread set of only 3X a light down stroke.

 

 

I suggest getting a semi-flex 140 (have 2), then you have three months to lighten up your hand to be ready for 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex. (Geha 790 is a good and cheaper alternative in semi-flex, have 3.)

Semi-flex can be used by the ham fisted....was one before I got my 140.

'flexi'/masi-semi-flex can be used by the slightly ham fisted.

 

Suggest after your semi-flex 140 to save money and get a 'flexi' 400, 400n, or 400nn. To make sure you get that 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex nib instead of another semi-flex....talk to Rick at Penquin or Penboard.de.

 

I of course did it the hard way.....26 semi-flex, 14 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex did by luck of the draw on German Ebay....I live there so fished my local pond.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 22 September 2014 - 08:54.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#8 cnjackson

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 13:39

That was a typo. I was typing from my phone and it likes to auto correct pen to "poem"

:)


Edited by cnjackson, 23 September 2014 - 13:40.


#9 Bringiton

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 13:34

Hi all,
Sorry to hijack topic but are the vintage 'CN' nibs popular? It doesn't seem to receive a lot of attention as compared to the other 14c nibs? Is it because it's rare or its 'not as good' as the gold nibs?

Regards,
BIO

#10 brewsky

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 14:04

Hi all,
Sorry to hijack topic but are the vintage 'CN' nibs popular? It doesn't seem to receive a lot of attention as compared to the other 14c nibs? Is it because it's rare or its 'not as good' as the gold nibs?

Regards,
BIO


Not necessarily. They were made for a shorter time period. I have and use a CN nib frequently, mine is quite flexible and the smoothest nib I own.

#11 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 18:44

My CN was only regular flex...about like a bit later 120's nib....still a regular flex is a good nib, but not the wonder of flex.

 

Could well be some one didn't want a nib with much 'flex'.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#12 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 05 October 2014 - 16:55

This picture isn't the greatest quality and I'm not very good at writing in cursive with these nibs, but hopefully it'll give you an idea of what to expect. These are the three I have on had at the moment. I would say the CN nib has very little spring, its quite rigid and the line variation only comes from the fact that its an OBB. The 300 is very soft and flexy; same with the 400NN.

IMG_4010_zps772f6c76.jpg

 

This picture isn't the greatest quality and I'm not very good at writing in cursive with these nibs, but hopefully it'll give you an idea of what to expect. These are the three I have on had at the moment. I would say the CN nib has very little spring, its quite rigid and the line variation only comes from the fact that its an OBB. The 300 is very soft and flexy; same with the 400NN.

IMG_4010_zps772f6c76.jpg

nice batch of pens :thumbup:


Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pelikan, flex, semi flex, 400, vintage



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