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Genetically Engineered Eucalyptus Trees, And The Implications For Better Fp Paper!

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29 replies to this topic

#21 dcwaites

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 01:59

Odd how the "gum tree" has become both friend and foe.

 

I recall visiting Australia for the first time decades back and seeing all of the varieties of the eucalypts across the vast spaces of  the country from Tasmania to Bathurst Island, and marveling at the different looks of the trees, then to move to California later, and find them almost everywhere, to some people a pest of a growth, to others a fragrant source of shade. Little did I suspect that this would become a source of paper for my fountain pens !

 

What's next, tea tree scented fountain pen ink ?  <wry smile>

 

 

 

John P.

 

The splitters amongst Botanical Taxonomists will tell you there are 600~700 species of Eucalypt. The lumpers will tell you there are 60~70 species.

The truth will lie somewhere in between...

 

Now I don't know about Tea Tree (Camelia) scented ink, but Ti Tree oil would act as both a very effective biocide and lubricant.


Edited by dcwaites, 23 September 2014 - 01:59.

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“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.

And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”

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#22 hbdk

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 21:53

It is rumoured that it has to go through the digestive system of a koala before your can make paper out of it :P


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#23 Anne-Sophie

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 12:47

Besides U.S made Crane, Neenah Conservation Paper; French made Clairefontaine / Rhodia / Conquerent, I would not mind trying Australian made bamboo and sugar cane paper.

 

As you can see fountain pen friendliness and sustainability are the most important criteria, so is bright white paper.

 

Can bamboo and sugar cane paper ever be bright white?

 

 

As far as eucalyptus is concerned, I know that it feeds one of the cutest Autralian import, koalas, who, despite their looks, can have quite a temper.

 

 

They were brought to California for their quick burning quality, 

I saw their destructive power during the Oakland Hills fire.

 

 

As early as the mid-1990's, I knew that something had to be done about invasive species everywhere, especially, in the U.S.

Unfortunately, apathy in regard to irresponsible exotic pet owners and shipping companies. then confusion about who would be in charge of the problem, then resistance to obey minimal standards has led to a very expensive program to eradicate exotic species which, now, threaten whole ecosystems.

 

I found out with dismay, that the exotic pet industry and shipping companies have been exposing Europe to the same plague.

 

 

There is a lot to write about on my sustainable paper.


Is it fair for an intelligent and family oriented mammal to be separated from his/her family and spend his/her life starved in a concrete jail?

#24 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 21:00

1922 the US government told the farmers to grow hemp....made a good paper that lasted 200 years.

 

One of the reasons hemp became illegal was the Pulp industry combined with Dupont's nylon rope...then very bouncy,,,couldn't hold a knot....made it so.

Hemp was and still is the second best rope. Manilla is best.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 15 October 2014 - 21:03.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#25 Randal6393

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 00:34

1922 the US government told the farmers to grow hemp....made a good paper that lasted 200 years.

 

One of the reasons hemp became illegal was the Pulp industry combined with Dupont's nylon rope...then very bouncy,,,couldn't hold a knot....made it so.

Hemp was and still is the second best rope. Manilla is best.

 

Best for what purpose, Bo Bo? Although, as an old sailor, will admit that nylon was a very dangerous way to tie up a ship. But, have wondered why more hemp hasn't been used in paper. Have a few sheets, it's a nice, strong paper that is great for fountain pens.

 

Enjoy,


Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#26 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 01 November 2014 - 18:04

Anslinger a GS-9 transferred from Prohibition to Narcotics in 1935-6. 

He wrote the 16, I think it was foremost pharmacists in the US, what is wrong with grass. 15 wrote back nothing. One wrote "it is thought, it could be. I have heard".

@ 1938

He took that testimony only, signed all 16 signatures to it, put it in a small sub-committee, and made grass a narcotic....all by himself, with help of bought congressmen.

GS-15 Anslinger plays himself the head of the DEA (actually as corrupt as the 1922 FBI) in the movie French Connection.

He was the bought right man at the right place, and got his reward.

Hemp became illegal....the Pulp paper industry was happy. Dupont with it's slippery rope was happy. After all no whites used the stuff....only them who went to Jazz joints were maryjane users and blacks.

Grass was illegal in Arizona before that; because the low paid Mexican workers didn't show up, to be treated like Burro's.

 

In New Jersey....the US has or had to the '80's our war reserve rope hemp plantation. They use to burn it every year.

 

There are many medical uses of grass, that were well known to 19th and early 20th century doctors and corner store pharmacists. It beats dangerous anti depression pills, and it has not yet been patented by the pharmaceuticals, yet.

Expect the fight to keep cheap safer medicine out of the hands of the people to continue.  

 

The hemp paper I have seen has been almost BP quality, not the fountain pen quality of 1922, when the government recommended the farmers grow hemp as good 200 year paper.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 02 November 2014 - 09:02.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#27 RLTodd

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 01:58

Sorry, the eucalyptus boat sailed loooooooong ago. All over central and southern California, mostly from trees planted as a quick firewood supply back in the 1870s. And that was after they'd been imported into throughout Europe, northern Africa, India, and South America. Burns pretty well, though.

 

Even if you didn't intend to light off the Oakland hills.

 

Yes, filthy things.  The leaves and sheddings put a kill zone for any other plant growing in their span.
I think people gave up on the firewood idea, I have never seen them at the wood dealers.
About the only thing they are good for is a wind break.  Not good to stand under for shade, they have a habit of dropping off a heavy branch now and then.

I am surprised anyone would spend any R&D funds on them.  I agree, their time has long passed.

 


YMMV

#28 Newjelan

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 06:14

I think people gave up on the firewood idea, I have never seen them at the wood dealers.

Still a major source of firewood in NZ - burns slow and hot - very efficient in a wood burner as long as you use a lighter wood to start.

Edited by Newjelan, 04 November 2014 - 08:03.


#29 pokermind

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 07:47

I had heard (and validated by wikipedia) that eucalyptus were originally grown in California in hopes of being harvested for lumber (fast, straight growing trees).  Unfortunately after cutting and drying, it twists and warps badly enough to make it useless for the intended purpose.



#30 dcwaites

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 21:49

 

Yes, filthy things.  The leaves and sheddings put a kill zone for any other plant growing in their span.
I think people gave up on the firewood idea, I have never seen them at the wood dealers.
About the only thing they are good for is a wind break.  Not good to stand under for shade, they have a habit of dropping off a heavy branch now and then.

I am surprised anyone would spend any R&D funds on them.  I agree, their time has long passed.

 

 

They're still good for growing Koalas. Also for eucalyptus oil which has multiple uses including antiseptic, cleaning and in air filters.


fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif

 

 

“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.

And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”

Granny Aching






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