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Parker Duofold Vs Visconti Homo Sapiens

visconti parker duofold centennial homo sapiens homo sapiens

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24 replies to this topic

#1 dezzick3

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 18:58

My summer job is almost over and the pay check is soon to be cashed.  I have decided to treat myself to a new pen having not acquired a new one for a while.  I have narrowed down the options to two, the Parker Duofold Centennial in marble acrylic or the Visconti Homo Sapiens Oversize Steel Age.  I already own a MB 146, an M800 and a Waterman Carene.  I can get the two pens for similar prices and would be using them daily, taking notes etc at university.  I'm drawn to the Visconti because of the superior nib and ink capacity but the Parker is more of a classic and, I think, the better looking.  To those who own one or both which would you recommend? 


For in all things the woman is full of fear, not able to look upon battle or cold steel. But when she is wounded over love no heart is more murderous. Medea 263-266

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#2 EclecticCollector

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 19:19

I can't help you as I don't own either (though I do own many international size Duofolds) but I wanted to make sure you were aware that the oversize Steel Age doesn't use the power filler system. If you care about that, only the Bronze Age oversize has it.

#3 de_pen_dent

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 19:24

Visconti.    I have 1 Duofold and several Viscontis and would pick any of my Viscontis over the Duofold any time.

 

The Parker is fairly overpriced for what it is (IMO).   For about the same price, the Visconti has more exotic materials & a unique filling mechanism.   Of course, if you like the looks for the Parker more, that's a different story.


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#4 shuuemura

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 19:57

The original Parker Duofold from the 1920s is a vastly superior pen to the modern one, in terms of ink capacity, flow, nib feel and ability not to dry out after a few days of unuse. The Visconti is also a superior pen to the modern Centennial.



#5 Dutchess

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 19:57

Homo sapiens hands down: wondefull writer for long sessions, extremely durable for daily use.

#6 Bigeddie

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 20:04

I don't own any modern Duofolds, but I would highly recommend the Homo Sapiens. It's fantastic in terms of size, feel and performance. The nib is unlike any other I have. 


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#7 Zanshin

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 20:16

I would go for the Visconti as well, mainly for its uniqueness. I have a Duofold International in my drawer, brand new ,never been inked, but it's been there for nearly two years. Something about it doesn't inspire me and I just haven't got round to using it yet. The Homo Sapiens on the other hand is with me every day.

 

Whatever you choose, enjoy it but you know you'll end up buying the other one next year.


Edited by Zanshin, 04 August 2014 - 20:17.

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#8 perth

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 22:17

As an owner of an orange Centennial and a Steel Age HS, I feel that the Centennial feels better in my hands. The Visconti is quite heavy as is, and the oversize version would probably be even heavier. Also, I've had some flow issues in the system, and since it's a captured converter, I can't be bothered to try and remove it to be cleaned safely. The Duofold's nib also looks more balanced with the substantial body, as opposed to the rather small Dreamtouch nib. However, the Visconti is a much better writer, and still has great balance if you don't mind the added weight. The clip isn't for everyone, though.

#9 Charles Rice

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 22:21

I vote Parker.  I own a modern Duofold (1980s) and have used the Visconti.  The Visconti is a fine pen but I do not like the feel of the lava.



#10 WilsonCQB1911

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:56

If you're looking at the Visconti for ink capacity you'll be disappointed.  For as large a pen as it is, you'll only get about 1ml in a fill, not far off from what you'd get in a converter.  The capacity just isn't there.  And because the nibs tend to run wet, that pen runs out of ink faster than any pen I've owned.  I have some suspicion that the ink is getting somehow absorbed into the material while inside in the pen, as that pen runs out faster than I think it should.  I don't know though.  I have a newer one with the plastic insert in it to prevent ink on the section as well.

 

I don't own a new Duofold, so can't comment on that.



#11 View from the Loft

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 12:39

Whichever pen you use, it has to be the right pen for you - so the only way to answer your question is by trying them both.

 

I thought the Homo Sapiens looked fantastic, and it was on my "buy" list - until I tried one.  Yeuch.  Just not the right pen for me.

 

Now an international Duofold with a well adjusted medium or broad italic nib - nice pen (for me anyway).



#12 EclecticCollector

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 14:26

If you're looking at the Visconti for ink capacity you'll be disappointed.  For as large a pen as it is, you'll only get about 1ml in a fill, not far off from what you'd get in a converter.


This is because if you have the Steel Age (or a Bronze Age midi size) it actually does use a converter inside. Visconti calls this their "captured converter" mechanism and calls pens using it as being piston fillers. While not wrong, it's a bit misleading in my opinion as it's not what one usually thinks of when talking about piston fillers.

#13 Iscribe

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 17:07

I have 5 modern Parker Duofolds. The two from the eighties are wonderful writers. The more recent ones have required some nib tweaking. I also have a Homosapien steel age maxi that I love. Its fine nib puts down a smooth wet line. I'd go for the Homosapien for the unique feel of its volcanic resin construction and palladium nib.

#14 wspohn

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 17:36

Parker.  Just checked Ebay and there is a nice gray pearl in the centennial size for under $400.  If I didn't already own a half dozen or so I'd be darned tempted.

 

The Visconti is a nice pen, but I don't really like the feel of the material and it is fairly heavy as well.


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Vancouver BC
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#15 WilsonCQB1911

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 17:38

This is because if you have the Steel Age (or a Bronze Age midi size) it actually does use a converter inside. Visconti calls this their "captured converter" mechanism and calls pens using it as being piston fillers. While not wrong, it's a bit misleading in my opinion as it's not what one usually thinks of when talking about piston fillers.


Right you are! I forgot we were talking about the steel one. I have the bronze "power filler" and it's low on capacity as well.

#16 ArchiMark

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 18:31

FWIW, I've had about a dozen Parker Centennials....and they were all great writers and handsome pens too....

I had a chance to look at a HS once and while it's nice, I passed on it....

But to each his own.....

Go with the one that floats your boat....as you'll be the one using it....

:)

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#17 arran

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 18:41

Visconti for sure.
However beware thier nibs might be on the wet side at least my experience

#18 EclecticCollector

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 23:36

Right you are! I forgot we were talking about the steel one. I have the bronze "power filler" and it's low on capacity as well.

That's disappointing to hear that even the power fillers have such a low ink capacity.

#19 Buzz_130

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 00:19

I have the HS Bronze Age, and it is my least-used modern pen.  The fill mechanism is inconsistent, and the capacity is very low.  The nib is very nice, but it does lay down a very wet line.

 

For your budget, look at the Sailor Pro Gear or 1911 or Platinum 3776.  For a modern pen, the Japanese provide an excellent writing experience and exceptional craftsmanship.  You have some great options if you look to the Land of the Rising Sun.

 

Buzz



#20 arran

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:30

Fot sure the Japanese are unbeatable!!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: visconti, parker, duofold, centennial, homo, sapiens, homo sapiens



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