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What's This Obsession With A Flexible Nib?

flexible nib handwriting

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69 replies to this topic

#41 Fox Point

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 06:17

Cheers, Sandy1

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#42 Bill Wood

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 20:29

A flex nib is fun. I like using my Noodler's pens because they make writing fun. Their flex serves absolutely no practical purpose.

 That's it right there from Saski. He's a school teacher and probably doesn't use flex at school. I'm a broadcaster and make a ton of notes. A smooth medium or broad is the only thing I can use. I'd try a medium stub though to improve the look of my scratch.



#43 Aurko

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 06:59

Honestly flexible writing is a fun way to practice penmanship, but a lot of people come into it expecting it to be easy. Before I got my first flex pen, I practiced for hours with dip pens. My flex writing is by no means fantastic, but I do find it useful to make handmade cards and occasionally add a little flair. Normally, even with flex pens I write unflexed and I appreciate that they have taught me to write with as light a hand as possible. 



#44 Sandy1

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 09:24

Cheers, Sandy1

 

Hi,

 

Member aenjin contributed a Review of that pen+nib combo which includes the sample below.

http://www.fountainp...-nib/?p=2687784

post-102552-0-36499600-1369815294.jpg

 

Bye,

S1


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#45 max dog

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 17:49

So I can write like this guy:

 

https://www.youtube....MolEvB5EqA

That was cool.  Thanks for sharing!

 

Like others have stated, flex is fun!

 

Although I am not proficient enough to use my flex pen for everyday writing, I do use flex when I write a personal thank you note or to express a sentiment in a greeting card etc.  From a practical perspective I think flex can be used to let your hand writing stand out when you want to make a statement or have something special to say, or at the very least to show someone you went out of your way to write something in a special/unique way.

 

Of course you can do that with a stub or italic nib as well, or the use of a unique colored ink with a regular nib can make a statement too.


Edited by max dog, 04 August 2014 - 17:56.


#46 tonybelding

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 18:35

So I can write like this guy:

 

https://www.youtube....MolEvB5EqA

 

I do not want to write like that guy.  The sound his pen makes sets my teeth on edge, and that nib probably won't last long due to the repeated over-flexing and accumulating metal fatigue.



#47 JonSzanto

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 18:46

 

I do not want to write like that guy.  The sound his pen makes sets my teeth on edge, and that nib probably won't last long due to the repeated over-flexing and accumulating metal fatigue.

 

I believe he is writing on velum, with a more rough surface, and the camera is probably amplifying the sound (by picking it up at such close proximity). As for the flex, those nibs (on the Falcon) are quite flexible to begin with, and moreso after the Mottishaw work.

 

But, yeah, nib overnoise can be an irritant. ;)


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#48 paulmcmanus

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 18:59

I do not want to write like that guy.  The sound his pen makes sets my teeth on edge, and that nib probably won't last long due to the repeated over-flexing and accumulating metal fatigue.


I'd certainly like to be able to write like that guy - indeed, that video was the reason I bought a modified Falcon from Mr Mottishaw (it would be interesting to know how many more sales he's had on the back of that video). I think what I admired most was the technique and the clear mastery of the instrument; how quickly and unhesitatingly he was able to write in all those different styles.
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#49 Tinjapan

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 23:23

I'd certainly like to be able to write like that guy - indeed, that video was the reason I bought a modified Falcon from Mr Mottishaw (it would be interesting to know how many more sales he's had on the back of that video). I think what I admired most was the technique and the clear mastery of the instrument; how quickly and unhesitatingly he was able to write in all those different styles.


Practice, practice, practice....

#50 discopig

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 00:25

For everyday stuff I don't need flex, but for sketching or having fun with ink you just can't beat 'em.

 

@ToasterPastry I like the Moore Maniflex nibs too. I can carry those around as my main daily jotter (and often do) and give me a little flex to sketch with.

 

The only thing I hate about Moore Maniflex nibs is the fact that I only have one and they aren't that common on ebay or elsewhere. They are such great nibs.


Edited by discopig, 05 August 2014 - 00:26.


#51 JonSzanto

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 01:30

The only thing I hate about Moore Maniflex nibs is the fact that I only have one and they aren't that common on ebay or elsewhere. They are such great nibs.

 

No kidding. Over the last year I've gone from zero to 8 Moores, and only one nib was less than wonderful. They sure hit the sweet spot between stiff, daily writing and some occasional flex, and when cleaned up they are a very attractive nib. Later in the month I'm going to do a (current) family photo of mine.

 

Keep hunting!


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#52 krz

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 06:19

Maniflex destiny! ;)


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#53 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:15

The first time I had a flexible nib in my hands, I was very glad I had learned to write in a simple stiff nib italic calligraphy script...

I do it so little, I do need my book in front of me. :blush: :rolleyes:

 

The first letter I drew with a flexible nib, was an A and I knew how the letter was formed. So that made it easier to draw.

 

I always recommend learning stiff nib italic calligraphy as a basis for learning to form letters for more flexible nibs and scripts.

 

In both cases one should spend time learning how to draw the letters.

 

You don't have to flex a nib to the max. I'm down finally to five pens in my rotation. One is a Waterman 52 with a superflex nib. It's not a a real wet noodle. One of those nibs that I'd rate as between Easy Full Flex and a Wet Noodle.

 

I write with the pen, 'normal' seldom trying to flex a wide letter out of it. With a touch of pressure, I can add nice fancy to my regular Rooster Scratch. With a light hand, it's 'regular'....(regular by me is semi-flex and or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex).

It is nice to know, should I want some fancy, I have a pen handy for it.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 05 August 2014 - 09:26.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#54 Vikhalla

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 23:14

I like the way that the script looks in the examples that I've seen and hear experienced users spinning yarns of glory about "true flex" and "wet noodles"...the legend of flex has grown mighty on these very forums - more so than with any other type of nib.

 

As for my own personal hunt: I started out as a graphic designer/illustrator - I've taken italic calligraphy classes and know how to use and hold an italic nib properly and just find it too rigid. I'm the only person I know who owns fountain pens, therefore in order to try one out for myself I have to buy one or go to a pen show (not comfortable borrowing)...I can't get time off of work to go to any shows coming up and I refuse to pay an arm and a leg for a gamble (I don't know if I'll even like this type of nib!) and with all of the variations of flex out there (and just as many opinions about it), it adds up to more hunting than would normally be necessary for a pen. A desperation sneaks into the voice. A sense of, "All I want is to write with a flex nib...how can it take this long to find one...how can ebay snipers be so well trained...I think I'll mortgage my dog to get a vintage Waterman Eyedropper...yeah....that'll do it."...or something like that. 


Edited by Vikhalla, 05 August 2014 - 23:20.

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#55 cbaytan

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 00:25

I believe the obsession is pretty normal because  flex pens write like no other pens do in the world. Do they?
 


One boring blue, one boring black 1mm thickness at most.... 

Then there are Fountain Pens with gorgeous permanent inks..


#56 mberman14

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 01:42

There seems to be a surprising level of judgment and even anger on the part of some posters in this thread towards those of us who love our flex pens. I wasn't conned, I wasn't a marketing dupe, I'm not trendy, I don't think more expensive = better, I'm not snobby about them, I'm not obsessed (ok, maybe a bit obsessed), they weren't an unattainable grail, I don't have great handwriting and I never thought they would magically fix that, I wasn't trying to buy my way to being superior or having personality or being a person of substance or discernment, I didn't fall prey to a myth, or any of the other silly accusations that have been lobbed in this thread.

 

So, why do I write with flex nibs? Because I love, love, love the way it feels when I am writing with one. It's an indescribable sensation, and I recognize that it doesn't have that effect on everyone, but it does on me. I love the sound that they make. Writing with a flex pen for me is a tremendous sensory pleasure, much more so than writing with a firm or italic nib, though I have and use both of those types too. I just like it.

 

Do I really need to justify it any further than that? And does there have to be something wrong with me because I love something that you don't?



#57 Tootles

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 02:15

Agreed, and not at all, and no you don't have to justify it in any way at all.

 

I think there is a whole mythos around flex nibs that is not entirely credible. It's not difficult to write with a flex nib, it is difficult to write well with a flex nib. The point is that anything is difficult to do well if you haven't practiced it enough. Hell, I started last week, or there abouts, and if I can write passable English with one so can everybody else.

 

I love the feeling of the dip nib I have. It's very unlikely that I'll ever be able to afford either a vintage noodle or a customisation on modern pen - which is a pity - but I can get a flavour of it with a $1 dip nib.

 

Who needs justification?



#58 ac12

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 03:31

I too went with a dip pen to see what this flex thing was all about, without spending a ton of $$$.

Well I did like it.

 

But, I discovered that it is even easier to do flex with an oblique holder than a straight holder.  And you are NOT going to have that function on a fountain pen.  The oblique holder makes it so much easier to do the flex without ink spatter, scratching or snagging the tip.  I've moved to using the oblique holder 95+% of the time.  Now, the only time I use a straight holder is for the larger nibs that won't fit the oblique holder.

 

The other thing is, I can change flex nib, to get a different flex characteristic for less than $2.  In fact one of the flex nibs that I use (Hiro 41) only cost 60 cents.

 

And if you spring the nib and destroy it, a replacement nib is less than $2. 

I would hate to think of the cost of replacing a sprung flex nib on a fountain pen.

 

And like Cryptos said, you can get started with a dip pen and a flex nib for less than $10, less than $5 if you use your FP ink rather than dip pen ink.

The Peerless oblique holder that I use will set you back a whole $14. 


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#59 JonSzanto

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 03:50

There seems to be a surprising level of judgment and even anger on the part of some posters in this thread towards those of us who love our flex pens.

I can see by your post count that you are relatively new here, and just want you to know: don't read too much into these opinions and side-taking. Flex vs. Non is a very old topic on FPN, and a fair amount of the commentary is tongue-in-cheek. I can pretty well assure you that people aren't angry regarding flex nib lovers, just that the spectrum of pen use is wide, and those who want an XF nail for accounting purposes are very different than the artistic types who flourish their ink. And there are even people who like it all.

 

Don't worry, be flexy.


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
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#60 Tootles

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 04:47

I see what you did there, JonSzanto!







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