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How Do I Begin Making My Own Pens?

turning custom diy help beginner

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7 replies to this topic

#1 IAmTheMusic

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 22:45

Hello!

 

I've recently decided that I would like to begin crafting my own pens for personal use, and for sale. I know there are many levels of crafting from scratch to pen kits. I'd like to know where a good spot to start making wooden pens would be. I assume I'll need a lathe, drill press with a threading bit, etc. What else should I know, or are there any good videos to watch so that I can begin this new hobby?

 

Kevin



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#2 jj9ball

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 17:19

That is a slippery slope. Someone once told me that the less talent you have at making something the more you will need really good tools and equipment to make up the difference. Needless to say I have a TON of equipment. If you just want to make kit pens you need a lathe and a mandrel. You can drill the blanks on the lathe and cut them with a handsaw... this is the set up that probably 1/3 of the people who make kit pens have. Good news is that its not real expensive, and the bad news is that everyone will be able to copy your work. If you want to do the kitless pens like me and many of the other people on this site make...you will need more specialized equipment. I would make sure to get quite a few different sizes of taps and dies. You will also probably want a collet chuck with a set of er 32 collets. I couldn't make a kitless pen without a metal lathe (see my first point above), but many on this site have wonderful work on only a wood lathe. A metal lathe will cost you pretty dearly (mine was around $3000 and it is really just an average lathe). The list goes on... bottom line is that it just depends on which road you take. Pick a place to start and hold on to your wallet because it will only get worse. Just my 2 cents.

Come see some of my handmade pens!!!

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#3 Venemo

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 17:44

I don't have any experience with this, but I think you could also try your luck with 3D printing. I've seen some guy on youtube who made a pen using a 3D printer.



#4 Scriptorium Pens

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 20:30

Head on over to the International Association of Penturners:  http://www.penturners.org

 

Check out their library. It has a ton of articles and detailed tutorials on both kit and kitless turning. 

 

I recommend starting with a wood lathe, since they cost less than a metal lathe. Try it out to see if it's something you really, really enjoy doing, and then start upgrading your equipment when you are able.


Renée

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fpn_1381279657__scriptoriumpens-label4.p

Handcrafted Fountain & Dip Pens

 

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#5 IAmTheMusic

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 02:19

Thanks for the input, all!



#6 IAmTheMusic

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 02:20

That is a slippery slope. Someone once told me that the less talent you have at making something the more you will need really good tools and equipment to make up the difference. Needless to say I have a TON of equipment. If you just want to make kit pens you need a lathe and a mandrel. You can drill the blanks on the lathe and cut them with a handsaw... this is the set up that probably 1/3 of the people who make kit pens have. Good news is that its not real expensive, and the bad news is that everyone will be able to copy your work. If you want to do the kitless pens like me and many of the other people on this site make...you will need more specialized equipment. I would make sure to get quite a few different sizes of taps and dies. You will also probably want a collet chuck with a set of er 32 collets. I couldn't make a kitless pen without a metal lathe (see my first point above), but many on this site have wonderful work on only a wood lathe. A metal lathe will cost you pretty dearly (mine was around $3000 and it is really just an average lathe). The list goes on... bottom line is that it just depends on which road you take. Pick a place to start and hold on to your wallet because it will only get worse. Just my 2 cents.

You're talking to a man who owns a $13,000 silver concert band horn, many high powered lasers, and big guns. I'm no stranger to price :) Thank you for the heads up! 



#7 AndyNC

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 08:02

I have just stated making kit and kitless pens.

 

I used the following guide for kitless  http://newtonpens.fi...ountain-pen.pdf

 

It does not show how to put a clip on the cap but I'm finding this a challenge in itself in that you can buy many themed clips but not may plain in the size I wanted so I had to modify on from a kit.

 

For clip there is this tutorial http://www.fountainp...the-clip-story/

 

For kit pens there are many guides for kit pens on utube and Axminster tools has tutorials on their web site.

 

Hope this helps

 

Andy



#8 Orrell Post

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 13:24

I have have turned dip pens on a small woodturning lathe (I have had it for many years and is still as good as it was when I bought it). All you need are some nice timber blanks or small pieces of a branch of a wood such as Yew, a piece of brass tubing (or you can buy them ready cut to fit all steel nibs) and some nibs. The turned fountain pens are all beginning to look a tad the same.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: turning, custom, diy, help, beginner



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