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Reasons Not To Get A Mb 149

149 mb purchase new

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#21 Algester

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 09:59

or a custom Heritage 912 if you like them more "modern" than the cigar shape either way depends on your taste now


Edited by Algester, 26 June 2014 - 09:59.


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#22 Tas

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 10:03

If you don't buy one you perhaps won't be able to do things like this:

 

http://www.fountainp...orse/?p=2884814

 

(Thanks again fpupulin)



#23 richardandtracy

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 10:49

Reasons not to get the MB149: Personally, I actively dislike cigar shaped pens. I have a cigar shaped pen, the FPN Etruria LE from 2011, and my opinion applies to that one's shape too.

 

Regards,

 

Richard.



#24 dneal

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 11:07

Price.  I don't absolutely have to have a snowflake on my cap.  At the end of the day, it's an oversized, plastic piston filler with a gold nib.  There's no shortage of those in all shapes and sizes, and the majority are several hundred dollars cheaper.

 

The flip side of that is:  I don't begrudge folks who do want that snowflake, and are willing to pay for it.  If it's worth it to them, then it's worth it to them.  We don't have to agree on everything.



#25 penmanila

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 11:29

I think it should at least be said that some if not many of us who do like 149s didn't buy it for the "snowflake" or the "prestige" or the other silly notions that may come with buying more expensive things. For me the 149 has been well worth the (heavily discounted) price I've paid for it. I like its heft, I love its nib, and I like the way it sits in my hand.

Let's face it: at the end of the day, if the OP wants to make the most sensible decision about getting a 149, nothing will matter more than a trip to the boutique and a hands-on session with the pen. To those who like Montblancs, for snowflakes or whatever, very little or none of these supposed negatives will matter. To those who dislike or even hate MB (whether they've actually tried the pens or not), our endorsements won't matter either. And not to be unfriendly or anything, I suspect that "I just don't like and have never liked Montblancs" isn't going to help the OP much. Discussions of weight and price relative to similar pens (what's similar is another arguable topic) may be more on the mark. Just my two cents before I slink back to the MB forum ;)

Edited by penmanila, 26 June 2014 - 12:03.

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#26 UK Mike

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 13:13

Huge pen, huge price, huge and somewhat undeserved status, not really user-serviceable, stiff nib if you are buying new and it really IS made of acrylic plastic and not "precious fairy dust".

 

There are so many other pens I would rather buy than a new 149. Buy one if you wish to "flash the snowflake" but don't say you weren't warned.


Pens and paper everywhere, yet all our hearts did sink,

Pens and paper everywhere, but not a drop of ink.


"Cursive writing does not mean what I think it does"

#27 UK Mike

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 13:17

If you do get a Montblanc, I recommend a vintage one, or at least a used one. The 149 is a wonderful pen, but I feel that it is a tad overpriced if you choose to buy it at a boutique. It IS a quality pen, but there are many other quality pens for much lower. The nib isn't very springy unless you're looking at vintage, but I will reiterate what others have said before; it IS a theft magnet, and it would be horrible to lose. They're not as fragile as you may think, but I wouldn't rely on it to be sturdy or to take a beating. If you like oversize pens, I would say go for it to get a well rounded collection, but also consider a Sailor King of Pen, a Pelikan M1000, or anything else of similarly high build quality. 

 

I agree entirely with your post. A balanced view.  :)


Pens and paper everywhere, yet all our hearts did sink,

Pens and paper everywhere, but not a drop of ink.


"Cursive writing does not mean what I think it does"

#28 plumista

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 13:20

There is no chrome-trimmed version.

 

If you do not like golden-trimmed pens, do not buy this pen thinking someday in the future you will surely like it: you will never like it.

 

plumista



#29 inkstainedruth

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 13:54

I tried someone's 149 a while back.  I wouldn't want one.  The nib was decent but I have small hands and the pen was just way too big and heavy for me.  Also, if I'm going to be spending buku bucks on a pen, I have plenty of other ones in mind before I'd get a "splat" pen -- ones that are, IMO, much better looking.  

Truthfully, I'm not overly enamored of any of the MB Writers Edition pens either....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#30 rwilsonedn

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 16:24

In general I think the MBs are decent pens, and they are certainly beautifully finished. But a couple of reasons come to mind.

First, in my experience modern MB nibs are not particularly soft, and they are certainly not flexible. So if you are looking for a responsive nib, you may be quite disappointed. I would definitely try a Pelikan M1000 first: equal quality and the kind of nib you are looking for.

Second, a good part of the price of the MB is paying for the brand, not the pen. As others have suggested, there are at least equal--some, including me, would say superior--conservative-looking pens from the high-end Japanese manufacturers for considerably less money.

Third, are you set on a black, balance-style pen with gold furniture, or would you explore other looks? For instance there are many very beautiful high-end Italian pens, some (Omas comes to mind) with genuinely soft, flexible nibs. And there are unequalled Japanese hand-made pens at and below that price. Have you looked around and savoured the possibilities? The MB is well-finished, but at the end of the day it is an injection-moulded plastic, machine-made pen, not a hand-made pen from traditional materials.

Fourth, I think your concerns are real. The MB plastic is formulated for hard, shiny finish, not for durability. And there is a design problem where the bottom cap attaches to the barrel: the seam tends to crack, leaking ink. Not on every pen, of course, but it happens. Using extra writing pressure to make the rigid nib flex is asking for trouble.

Bottom line: if the 149 is the pen you really want, go for it, but go for a vintage one with a semi-flex nib, from a good restorer. You will save money and get the nib you want. If new is as important as you say, get the big Pelikan M1000.

If you are not certain that the MB is exactly the look you want, explore high-end pens from both Japan (breathtaking traditional craftsmanship) and Italy (breathtaking modern design). Either way, enjoy the search!

ron



#31 Joker4Eva

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 16:35

There is no chrome-trimmed version.

 

If you do not like golden-trimmed pens, do not buy this pen thinking someday in the future you will surely like it: you will never like it.

 

plumista

 

I always thought they had one. Guess I was mistaken.

 

I haven't gotten myself a Montblanc only because my budget doesn't allow it. That said, even if I could, I would get the 146 instead of the 149. I've tried the 149, and it simply feels like a baton to me, and its nib is a real nail. Not even a hint of spring. But I still want a 146 just to say that I've got a Montblanc in my collection, a modern one. Vintages can be had, but seeing that they really used to produce pens to fit all those tiers, I find it a little time consuming to learn the numbers. I have, however, had a Monte Rosa or two. Very nice school pens, and I'd be very glad if I was given one when I was a kid.



#32 tomgartin

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 16:45

Am I the only one in this thread who actually still wants one? I wrote with a 149 once, and while not magical, it was still a very nice pen and comfortable in my hand.

Right now, my reasons not to buy one are:
(1) More money than I could spend (or justify to my SO)

(2) I have a lovely Sailor 1911m that was tuned just right by Nibs.com when I ordered, and it scratches the itch pretty well.

 

Still, I'm surprised at the MB bashing here. Overpriced? Maybe. Overrated? Nope. By that logic, any fountain pen is overrated because there is always a cheaper pen that rights more favorably under certain conditions. We like FPs because of the feel, the style, maybe a little nostalgia, and the character of the instrument. Some instruments cost more than others and have more public recognition. 

 

If you like it and it won't hurt anyone to buy it, go right ahead. From what I hear, MB has a good reputation for servicing pens and will try to ensure your satisfaction long after the purchase date.


- - -

 

Currently trying to sell a Pelikan M400 White Tortoise. PM if you're interested.  :)


#33 Centurion

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 17:55

It is not a real springy nib like a Pelikan 1000.

It is a 'springy' nib...a flex set between 'true' springy regular flex and semi-flex; both spread their tines 3 X a light down stroke....a 'springy' nib bends well at the tip, but only spreads it's tines 2 X a light down stroke.

A 1000 can be as some folks say a nice springy nib. The one I tried in a B&M was semi-flex. I have some 27 semi-flex nibbed pens.

 

Another reason not to buy is both are 18 K nibs, so if you bend it a tad too much....it remains bent, where a 14 K nib would not have that problem.

 

Modern MB nibs seem to run wide....defiantly do to a vintage '50's nib.

I would suggest getting a 149 from the grand '50-65 nib, that would be either semi-flex or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex or the '66-75 that has a tad less spring to the nib in comparison.

 

The older vintage nibs are not on the whole quite as blingy as modern, but I like them. My 742 is bi-colored, so rather blingy for the time.

Of course mine are not a 149.

I have two standard sized pens a rolled gold 742, ('51-55) with that 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex and a 234 1/2 Deluxe semi-flex KOB, ('52-55)

 

Back then the 146 was a medium-large pen, that grew into a Large pen in the '80s.

 

It all depends on what you want the nib to do...I'd suggest a '50-75 one with a better nib, than the only  'springy' '76 to modern.

 

Agree with stogy...it is after all a '30's Sheaffer New Balance clone. ;)

I don't know enough about nib terminology to know precisely what you mean by semi-flex vs. "true" springy. Help!

 

I used a flexible nib before. Great for line variation, push nib and the tines spread. Release and the tines close up. But for everyday writing, I can't write fast with a flex nib.

 

Springy means to me, the nib has "shock absorbers". I can write fast and the nib has give and instantaneously goes up to original nib shape once I release pressure. I see what you mean when you say a springy nib bends well at the tip, but can't picture what a semi-flex nib does or is.



#34 Centurion

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 17:57

Cost
Not the springy nib you seek

But I would say it is more durable than you expect from your post.

You will not go to far wrong with the 90th anniversary edition.

What is then springy nib I seek? The Pelikan 1000 which has been mentioned a few times?

 

Any of the Japanese made FPs?



#35 Centurion

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 17:59

Obscene price.  

 

You can get 6 or 7 other wonderful "big pens with springy nibs" for the price of 1 MB.  And you can carry them out of the house, to boot!

 

Hand me $1000 and I would have a list of 100 other pens I would buy before the MB, many of which would fit your criteria and very likely out perform the MB.  With that kind of budget, and so many drool-worthy pens, seems a shame to throw it all on this one pen.

 

However, value is in the eye of the beholder, and I know many around here absolutely adore their MB's and specifically the 149.  That's the beauty of personal taste - you can't put a price tag on personal fit and preference.

Please give me some ideas.  :) I know the big names in FP, but know little of the Japanese brands. I've heard of Sailor, but never used one before.



#36 Betweenthelines

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 18:05

Please give me some ideas.   :) I know the big names in FP, but know little of the Japanese brands. I've heard of Sailor, but never used one before.

 

For springy nibs I would recommend any of the higher tier Pilots with non-soft nibs (Custom series).  The soft nibs are closer to semi-flex, while the "hard" nibs are actually very springy.  I only own one Sailor and its nib is not what I would consider springy, at least compared to my Pilots.  A lot of people rave about the Custom 823.  



#37 Joker4Eva

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 18:09

I don't know enough about nib terminology to know precisely what you mean by semi-flex vs. "true" springy. Help!

 

I used a flexible nib before. Great for line variation, push nib and the tines spread. Release and the tines close up. But for everyday writing, I can't write fast with a flex nib.

 

Springy means to me, the nib has "shock absorbers". I can write fast and the nib has give and instantaneously goes up to original nib shape once I release pressure. I see what you mean when you say a springy nib bends well at the tip, but can't picture what a semi-flex nib does or is.

 

You know, there's this option on the left of the "Quote" button, which allows you to insert many quotes into your reply, without the need of going through the process of quoting and replying repetitively. Might be easier seeing how most of your replies were regarding the same issue, ie "What's a springy nib like?"

 

My definition of a springy nib is something like yours. A "shock absorber" nib, not meant for flexing. Don't care much how it bends, more on the writing feel.



#38 Moshe ben David

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 18:09

As long as we're tossing in candidates for consideration:

 

  • Absolutely Pelikan.  But I'd say do a comparison between the M1000 and the M800.  The M800 is slightly smaller and therefore a bit less costly.  More importantly maybe, would be that being somewhat smaller may or may not make a difference to you when you handle it.
  • I'd also recommend you take a look at the modern Parker Duofold, here again in both the Centennial and the International versions.  The International being shorter and slimmer.  Be aware that the Duofold is not a piston fill but rather uses cartridges or a converter.  Some folks like this better for cleaning, some like the piston fill for larger capacity.

I use both Pelikan and Parker and like both brands; have to admit I've yet to even handle any MB pens.  My sense of it is that the Duofold nibs while smooth are not as springy as the Pelikan nibs.


Moshe ben David

 

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#39 Centurion

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 18:19

MBs never interested me but if you wan some springy nib... plus the price plus I'm still a student what you'd expect me to whip out a high tier pen at school...

Justus 95 would be a good hefty pen

I havent touched a GvFC but its on my list

if not a Visconti Homo Sapiens bronze or steel also on my list it has some spring because of the Palladium bodied nib

Omas Milord...

Edison pens with a gold nib?

Do you mean Waterman Edson, or perhaps there's a line of FPs from Edison. I tried an Waterman Edson years ago, the nib was a nail. But a very smooth writing experience.


Edited by Centurion, 26 June 2014 - 18:19.


#40 Centurion

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 18:28

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

 

But when I saw a 149 in a store I wondered if really anxious men were trying to compensate for something. 

 

I also agree with many here.  A grand for a plastic pen is crazy.  You could even buy a used or new old stock metal pen.  Here is a Montegrappa under your budget.  It is sterling.  It will last longer than any plastic pen and you will never have to explain the phrase "precious resin" to anyone.  I have a similar Cosmopolitan Oceanic of the same size and I am thrilled with it. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/...=item53fa3730ee

 

Good luck.  Please note that I would commit unspeakable acts for a platinum 149.  And odds are decent I would get a plastic, er, resin 149, under the right circumstances--like a bold nib and very cheap. 

 

There's a platinum version of the 149?!?!?  I don't think I saw that on their website. It must be $10,000?

 

 

You know, there's this option on the left of the "Quote" button, which allows you to insert many quotes into your reply, without the need of going through the process of quoting and replying repetitively. Might be easier seeing how most of your replies were regarding the same issue, ie "What's a springy nib like?"

 

My definition of a springy nib is something like yours. A "shock absorber" nib, not meant for flexing. Don't care much how it bends, more on the writing feel.

 

Thanks for pointing that out. Didn't really know how to use it, so I avoided it. :)







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