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Reasons Not To Get A Mb 149

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#181 sotto2

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 14:09

Just checking back into this thread to see what has people's knickers in a twist today. Carry on.  :)


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#182 Algester

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 15:00

no its a good idea to say to at least never buy a new MB in a boutique store especially something as a flagship pen such as a 149 BECAUSE THERE'S TOTALLY CHEAPER ALTERNATIVES unless you want something to flaunt about.

 

but think about it in the long run is this the reason why MB isnt getting an income for every pen they sale?


Edited by Algester, 08 July 2014 - 15:02.


#183 Centurion

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 20:46

Reading the last posts, I am not sure what you are looking for anymore. Big nibs (#9) will not make your pen write any better for sure. It's a luxury mostly and a design choice sometimes (proportions). A big pen will very likely be on the heavy side, even if it's a c/c filler.
If the 149 did hit something and you have the money for it, I cannot see any pen related reason not to buy one. Maybe have a look for the 90th anniversary.
But.
You should know that gold nibs are not better than steel nibs.
At this point, with the kind of money you have, if really big nibs and heavier pens are not to your likings, I would suggest to have a look at custom pen makers. Edison jumps to mind and he offers interesting filling mechanisms. Newton pens, although I never did deal with him, seems to be able to produce any pen you could think of, and does offer pretty big ones. Ken Cavers is also a custom pen makers, maybe more on the hbbyist side of the spectrum, but his work is just amazing and he has a very good feeling about the details of the pen you could ask him to make. I already suggested Romillo and Gimena pens in Spain. Oldwin, in France (à la boutique Mora, in Paris), or Fred Faggionato also in France are options too. Astoria and Tom Westerlich are likely to offer you nice choices...
If I may: if really you don't care about nib size, but are looking for a big, not too heavy pen, you should have a look at Danitrio. The Mikado model is hudge, the Densho (or Takimi for a c/c filler) is smaller, but still in the league of the 149, maybe slightly thinner at the grip. They are Japanese eyedropper filler (not the Takimi), comes with German Bock nibs that have a certain flex, and are urushi finished.

Have fun!

Hmmm, check out Edison, Newton, Ken Cavers, Romillo (Spain), Gimena (Spain) , Oldwin (by Mora in France), Fred Faggionato (France), Astoria, Tom Westerlich, and Danitrio (Mikado, Densho, Takimi but the nibs are more #6 size). You certainly know your FPs.

 

This thread has made me think, which is its purpose, so in that sense my mind is changing. I already have a Stipula Etruria FP which I believe is a #6 size nib. I think the larger #9 nib looks good, especially on the 149. Never saw a M1000 in person, but in pics the Pelikan nib looks too long, not particularly good-looking, although the M1005 (rhodium plated) looks better than the standard M1000 nib.

 

Initially, my goal was an oversized nib (#9) in an oversize pen, in that order. Why are so few oversize nibs made? I thought that bigger nib, especially longer tines would increase springiness?

 

Have you tried a 149?  See if you even like writing with one.

 

ETA.  I tried one and found it too big for me to write comfortable with.  I wear XL gloves.  Went with a 146 instead that is very comfortable for me.

 

Every pen is different, even if they appear to be the same size.  The shape, dimensions and balance, etc. are all diiferent and will feel different in your hand.  What someone else finds comfortable, you may not and vice versa.  For that kind of money, you really need to try it out and compare it to other pens to find the one that's right for you.

 

I have tried out various 149s in a MB boutique. The girth is great for me, and the weight is fine. I could go heavier. I felt the 149 was well-balanced whether posted or not. I've held a limited edition OMAS (forget the name) was it was ridiculously heavy with too much metal and badly balanced. The customer rep at MB said not to judge too much of the nibs on the 149 because too many people have come by the store and tried them out, and that they don't correct/fix them. I was to assume all the nibs were misaligned and damaged. Having said that, I thought the B nib gave good line variation, but a bit too broad for me, while the M didn't give any line variation. The big nib on the 149 looked good!

 

Hum... interesting topic... I personally like the larger size pens. I hope the following would help the OP.

 

But one question for the OP, what do you consider "large pen"? Is it the girth of the pen or the length of the pen?

 

I have all these pens right now:

 

I will use the rating between 1 - 10 for the weight. It is relative to the 149 weight. 

 

1. MB 149 - good size and not heavy ( 5)

2. Dumas - same girth with the 149 but a little shorter I usually end up posting it when i use it for a long writing session the  weight is also a 5.

3. Visconti Lava pen (steel) version, the nib is kind of springing and good flow but the steel version has a build in convertor so the ink capacity is very low. Weight is about 6 or 7. The nib size is not a number 9 nib but number 6 nib and the girth is not as large as the 149.

5. Nakaya long size - convertor (small ink capacity ) very light ( maybe a 3) but also has less girth than 149. It's an over size pen because its long. 

6. Omas Paragon (new version with metal gripping) - Smaller nib (number 6) good ink capacity but i think the weight is off. Least comfortable for long writing compare to my other over size pens. The weight is about 6 isn because of the metal section. 

7. Pelikan M1050 - Nice springing nib and similar size as number 9 nib. Good ink capacity. Weight a little more than 149 but the weight is pretty evenly spread out so i can use it for long writing session. 

8. Sailor King of Pen Ebonite version - this pen have a very nice springing nib but lack of ink capacity. Weight about the same as 149, maybe just a little bit more because of the metal section that sailor uses to screw the body and the nib unit. 

 

 

Based on your original post I would recommend Pelikan M 1000. Please feel free to ask me the nib smoothness and which one i use more if that is important to you. Hopefully above will help. 

 

Smoothness is important, but really like the springy (shock absorber) feeling. I once tried a Waterman Edson in a store. Very smooth, probably the smoothest I have experienced, but the Edson had a hard nail for a nib. How's the smoothness of the M1000? Weight is the least critical to me. I like the weight of the 149 which is a 5 on your scale, and could easily go to a 7 or 8.

 

I also want to add that "springing" is relative to each person's taste. Some people would say 149 is springing but compare to all those pens listed above, it is not. 

 

The most springing nib is the Pelikan M 1000, follow by Sailor King of Pens. Rest are pretty stiff. 

 

More than a few days ago I tried to order a Sailor KOP with the naginata togi nib with Engeika. Good prices, but their website wouldn't let me proceed to the next step. Must be some glitch so I emailed them and still haven't heard back. The naginata togi nib sounded interesting, did some research here, but didn't really ask about the springiness of the naginata togi nib. Would you know the springiness of the naginata togi nib? 

 

I could get the KOP and still hunt for a vintage 149, and be within budget. Has anyone here heard of Engeika store?

 

It's too good for you.

 

Many things and many people are too good for me.



#184 Centurion

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 20:53

Wow, haven't got time to read the whole thread, but perhaps it was good thing my order for a KOP with naginata togi nib didn't go through with Engeika. I should have research Engeika here on FPN first.



#185 de_pen_dent

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:58

Wow, haven't got time to read the whole thread, but perhaps it was good thing my order for a KOP with naginata togi nib didn't go through with Engeika. I should have research Engeika here on FPN first.

 

Wrong thread perhaps?   For what it is worth, Engeika are absolutely great to deal with and i have no hesitation buying from them.   I should be getting a Platinum Izumo Yagumonuri from them in the next few days - my 5th or 6th LE pen I have gotten from them.


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#186 inkstainedruth

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:54

 

Were controversy and discussion the real criteria for "greatness", Noodler's would be the greatest.  Ever.

:lticaptd:

And for a LOT less money than even a used Montblanc.  In fact, if you took *all* my Noodler's pens (3 FPCs, 3 regular Konrads and one ebonite Konrad --PLUS the one I lost) and added up the cost (and not factoring in that I got a couple of them on closeout -- assume standard prices) it would still be only a fraction of the price of *one* new 149 (I'm guessing maybe a quarter to a third of the price).   I know some people complain about the QC, but *all* of mine worked well out of the box, with only a quick rinse in soapy water, except the first one; and even that one just needed to find the ideal ink for it.  Yes, I do admit to be something of a notorious cheapskate, but still....

Nope, I'm wrong.  I just looked at MB's website and the ratio is more like 5 to 1 between the price of a new 149 and ALL the Noodler's pens I ever bought... turned out that the "1/3" price is more in line with a 149 BP!  :yikes:  

(Okay, admittedly the nibs on the Konrads are only size 6; anyone know offhand what size nib the new Neponsets are going to have?  :rolleyes:)

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#187 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 16:55

no its a good idea to say to at least never buy a new MB in a boutique store especially something as a flagship pen such as a 149 BECAUSE THERE'S TOTALLY CHEAPER ALTERNATIVES unless you want something to flaunt about.

 

but think about it in the long run is this the reason why MB isnt getting an income for every pen they sale?

Get a vintage 149 from the 60's-70's-early 80's from Gary Lehrer, it  will beat any japanese pen and italian pen you will ever buy. Don't ask me why I know it by experience   


Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#188 Centurion

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 16:59

Get a vintage 149 from the 60's-70's-early 80's from Gary Lehrer, it  will beat any japanese pen and italian pen you will ever buy. Don't ask me why I know it by experience   

 

From GoPens.com, correct? Would you happen to know the exact cutoff year? He has one that's a 1985, is that early 80s enough?

 

How would you characterize a 149 nib that's pre 1976 vs. 1976 to the early 80s?



#189 kaisede

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 02:00

Hi Centurion, 

 

M1000 nib is very smooth. And the KOP nib that I tested out was standard nib not the Naginata Togi nib. I end up buying the king eagle nib. 


Edited by kaisede, 11 July 2014 - 02:04.


#190 arran

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 13:06

I would never buy a MB 149 if
You really want a fine nib : I just love my fine Japanese writers , just cannot be matched with any Western nibs
Even a xf of f within , at least my impressions are still quite thick line writers

#191 Blade Runner

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 13:22

I would never buy a MB 149 if
You really want a fine nib : I just love my fine Japanese writers , just cannot be matched with any Western nibs
Even a xf of f within , at least my impressions are still quite thick line writers

Aurora XFs are the exception to the rule.  They are thinner than other western nibs in my experience and quite beautiful writers.   Regarding the 149, John Mottishaw modified one of mine to an XF comparable to a Japanese width.   So if you want to have the experience  a 149 and a thinner XF, there is a way!



#192 AustinMalone1999

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 13:53

I would say to you, get a Pelikan M1000 for that springy nib or get a jumbo pen from Shawn Newton, they are custom, hand adjusted, the warranty is looser, and he offers 14 and 18 KT nibs the likes of which are on the Edison pens and are know for their inherent softness. Then you have a one of a kind pen just the way that you like it, and it' can come in at less the $400. The queue is starting to get rather long though, so I would hurry.



#193 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 15:18

 

From GoPens.com, correct? Would you happen to know the exact cutoff year? He has one that's a 1985, is that early 80s enough?

 

How would you characterize a 149 nib that's pre 1976 vs. 1976 to the early 80s?

Yes gopens.com. Gary is a vintage MB specialist and I happen to know my  149 nibs because I have read a lot of stuff about vintage MB nibs. Pre 1976 can be broad shoulders  or short shoulders long tines nib, 1976 to 1984 will be the same, with the ebonite feed of course


Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#194 Centurion

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 21:57

Yes gopens.com. Gary is a vintage MB specialist and I happen to know my  149 nibs because I have read a lot of stuff about vintage MB nibs. Pre 1976 can be broad shoulders  or short shoulders long tines nib, 1976 to 1984 will be the same, with the ebonite feed of course

 

Ah, so 1984 is the cutoff year. 1985 and beyond is "modern" style nibs.

I would say to you, get a Pelikan M1000 for that springy nib or get a jumbo pen from Shawn Newton, they are custom, hand adjusted, the warranty is looser, and he offers 14 and 18 KT nibs the likes of which are on the Edison pens and are know for their inherent softness. Then you have a one of a kind pen just the way that you like it, and it' can come in at less the $400. The queue is starting to get rather long though, so I would hurry.

 

The biggest nib Shawn Newton offers is a #8 Jowo nib, how does that compare to the 149 #9 nib? Just a bit smaller?



#195 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 18:55

 

Ah, so 1984 is the cutoff year. 1985 and beyond is "modern" style nibs.

 

The biggest nib Shawn Newton offers is a #8 Jowo nib, how does that compare to the 149 #9 nib? Just a bit smaller?

 

1985 and beyond is definitely modern style nibs. A 149 nib is a 149 nib, I don't know  about Shawn Newton's pen nib


Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time





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