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Suitability Of Namiki Falcon As Edc/workhorse?

falcon workhorse daily carry

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37 replies to this topic

#1 superglueshoe

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:45

Hello!

I was just wondering what everyone thinks about using a Pilot/Namiki Falcon as a workhorse pen? I don't intend on flexing it much (I do like the sound of that soft feeling they advertise), but I do want to use it for very large amounts of writing and maybe on not so good paper. The ink capacity doesn't bother me TOO much as long as I can get at least 10 Pages or so out of it as I can keep refilling (I'm thinking of a fine, 5/10 wetness from Binder). So what's everyone's experience with it? Does the softness of the nib make it weird/hard to use for very long periods of time? Do you have any ergonomic issues with its nib? Or its Shape/Weight/Design?

 

Thanks :)


Edited by superglueshoe, 21 June 2014 - 10:46.


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#2 Lord Epic

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 11:00

Not too sure about the Falcon, but I do have a soft nib on my Custom 74, which I hope can be of reference to you.

 

The soft nib writes lovely :) it won't flex unless I put pressure on it, so that's okay! A soft nib is great for daily writing :D

 

With regards to writing, I think the ink paper combo would be more of an issue. If you're gonna use it on not so good paper, get well behaved inks! Try X-feather, not too bad, that!

 

Hope I've helped! :)

 

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#3 alexander_k

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 12:09

I actually find the softness of the nib handy for extended periods of writing. Ink capacity shouldn't be a problem either. My main priority would be ergonomics: does the pen sit comfortably in the hand for long hours? There is no reason the Falcon wouldn't fit most hands but you never know ...



#4 Scribblesoften

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 15:17

There are two pen bodies for these, the metal and the resin. I can only speak to the resin as I have two. The pens are the same size, uncapped as a Pelikan 200. Unposted they are quite light. Posted they are still light and balance well. I have the soft fine and the soft medium. I tend to use the soft fine more frequently. If you have a light hand, these are great pens. For me, hand fatigue is minimal because of their light weight. I have semi flex nibs that write as normal pens until you put pressure on them and then they flex. This is a different beast. These nibs are soft all the time but, for me, exhibit very limited flex. I love these little pens and highly recommend them. My only gripe is ink capacity. If the Con-70 would fit, they would be even better.

#5 superglueshoe

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 15:27

Thanks for the info :). I've been wanting one for a while. But I was concerned that the soft nib might give me problems for very long sessions. But from your replies none of you found that a problem :D.

One follow up question, does the nib require more control? I only have experience with rigid nibs so any form of flex is new to me.

#6 Ambien

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 15:35

Thanks for the info :). I've been wanting one for a while. But I was concerned that the soft nib might give me problems for very long sessions. But from your replies none of you found that a problem :D.

One follow up question, does the nib require more control? I only have experience with rigid nibs so any form of flex is new to me.

 

No I didn't find that the nib requires more control over firm nibs. I'd call it springy. I use medium to heavy pressure and it's fine for me. 


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#7 Tas

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 15:41

You'll LOVE it . . .



#8 sotto2

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 16:03

I don't actually have any Pilot/Namiki Falcons, but have you thought about a Lamy 2000? ;-)

K, just kidding. For years, my main everyday FPs were two soft flex Pilot Metal Falcons, one EF and one M. I love 'em.

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#9 Houston

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 16:09

It's a great EDC.  No need to hesitate.  The soft nib doesn't require additional control, so long as you're not a particularly heavy-handed writer.  

 

My only counsel would be to handle both the resin and the metal-bodied versions before buying, if you're able to.  (I know; that's asking a lot in this day and age.)  They do feel quite different in the hand.  I find I enjoy writing with the metal-bodied version a bit more, but it's entirely personal preference.



#10 PAKMAN

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 16:14

I have to come down on the other side on this one. I had a very hard time getting my Falcon to be a consistent writer, it had lots of hard starts and skipped badly. I eventually sold mine.


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#11 dmourati

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 17:33

My Falcon Soft Fine is great when it writes well but tends to railroad on down strokes for me. Most likely a user error.

 

I've since gotten a Sailor Fine with a stiffer nib and had exactly zero problems with its writing.



#12 dneal

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 18:29

The soft nib writes lovely :) it won't flex unless I put pressure on it, so that's okay! A soft nib is great for daily writing :D

 

 

No I didn't find that the nib requires more control over firm nibs. I'd call it springy. I use medium to heavy pressure and it's fine for me. 

 

 

It's a great EDC.  No need to hesitate.  The soft nib doesn't require additional control, so long as you're not a particularly heavy-handed writer.  

 

+1 to all this.  Mine gets used daily.  It doesn't flex unless you're putting some substantial pressure on it.  The fine nib can be a little "toothy" on some paper, and the basic Pilot ink will feather on cheaper paper.  Capacity isn't that big of an issue if you use the cartridges, but the converter is a little small if you're looking to write 10 pages at a pop.



#13 dneal

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 18:30

My Falcon Soft Fine is great when it writes well but tends to railroad on down strokes for me. Most likely a user error.

 

I've since gotten a Sailor Fine with a stiffer nib and had exactly zero problems with its writing.

 

If it's railroading under normal writing (i.e. you're not trying Spencerian), then you're pressing way to hard.



#14 discopig

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 03:15

I have two Falcons, one in Resin with SF nib and another in SEF in Metal Sapphire. They both work great as EDC, I can write with bth them anywhere I am and do some sketching, which works great with their soft nibs.


Edited by discopig, 22 June 2014 - 03:15.


#15 TradArch

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 03:43

I used a metal Falcon as my EDC for a while. No problems with the soft nib at all; I loved the variety of uses - drawing, notes, regular writing, etc.

In my experience and personal opinion, if you want some variety of lineweight, I would go to at least a 6/10 on wetness.

Also, with not so good paper I would tend to a M nib; or just be prepared to inspect and clean the nib a little bit after a few pages of writing. The F may pick up some fibers from the paper. That is, also, just personal exp though.

#16 napalm

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 03:55

Please define "workhorse"? If your purpose is to be able to write at very high speeds while still maintaining decent legibility, I'd say go for a rigid nib (and good, smooth paper). For all other purposes the Falcon would probably do.



#17 superglueshoe

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 05:17

That's good to know there won't be issues. Hopefully Binderization will take care of any railroading problems some people have found. I think I will get the resin version as I like a nice light pen.

 

Regarding Workhorse Definition: Well I buy all my pens for the role of a workhorse - which I define as used to write anything and everything in all situations and with very large volumes of it. As to speed, I guess a bit above average will suit me fine?


Edited by superglueshoe, 22 June 2014 - 05:47.


#18 napalm

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 12:50

That's good to know there won't be issues. Hopefully Binderization will take care of any railroading problems some people have found. I think I will get the resin version as I like a nice light pen.

 

Regarding Workhorse Definition: Well I buy all my pens for the role of a workhorse - which I define as used to write anything and everything in all situations and with very large volumes of it. As to speed, I guess a bit above average will suit me fine?

 

Fast speed, large volumes - these call for a light pen that can hold a lot of ink. Custom 92 and 912 come to mind. In the Falcon line, if you go for the resin version, it will be light but you can't use the CON-70. How about a 91 (smaller) or 912 (larger) with a FA flex nib? I'd say it's an option worth investigating.

 

P.S. Also check if the pen is long enough / well balanced to be used without the cap posted. Removing the cap's weight is a GoodThing ™ when trying to write fast.


Edited by napalm, 22 June 2014 - 13:08.


#19 dmourati

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 02:38

 

If it's railroading under normal writing (i.e. you're not trying Spencerian), then you're pressing way to hard.

 

I'd rephrase to "railroad skipping" where the pen generally skips but puts down some feint ink at the tine edges. I agree though, probably pressing too hard.



#20 discopig

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 03:57

The Falcon should be able to keep up without problem no matter how fast you write. I've used mine for shorthand practice and quick note taking and it's been working great.







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