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How To Recognize A Fake Visconti...should I Be Worried?


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#21 raging.dragon

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 02:46

Agree with everyone else. It's the real thing. Yeah, have to say Visconti pens don't have the best quality when compared with pens from Germany or Japan. But they win in the design apartment any day. I have an LE Wall Street that has so many little errors, you'd think it's a cheap pen! Think of them as quirks, and part of the charm of Italian pens.

 

[...]

 

Machines don't make mistakes. So small errors tend to indicate work done by human hands. :)



#22 raging.dragon

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 02:51

 

Palladium usually is paramagnetic and doesn't interact with magnetic field strongly. In particular Visconti's Pd nibs are not attracted by household magnets (didn't try the real stuff, of course). That being said, however, not that many fountain pen nibs are attracted to magnets regardless the material (dip nibs is a different story), anyway. Among all nibs I have, I believe, only Jinhao's nibs can be picked by a magnet. There was a thread around here somewhere discussing this sort of things.

 

Many stainless steel alloys (the Austenitic or 300 series ones) are non-magnetic.



#23 recluse

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 06:10

 

Many stainless steel alloys (the Austenitic or 300 series ones) are non-magnetic.

 

True, therefore chances to expose fake with a magnet are quite slim.






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