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Welcome to the Esterbrook Forum!


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30 replies to this topic

#21 Rabbit713

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 17:06

Thanks for the information!  I'll check on the loaner program once I get the 30 required posts! 


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#22 Heartsleeve

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 22:26

 
First time on this forum, so dont know if I am loading these images correctly.... trying to find out any info I can on this vintage Esterbrook.
 
Still writes very well, but the lever on the fill is very very stiff and only rises maybe a quarter inch.
 
Thanks.
 
Mare

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#23 Hank138

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:23

Hi. I bought an Esterbrook pen a few days ago. The last time I bought one was 60 years ago. Well, technically, my mother bought that one for me on one of our shopping trips for school supplies. I am delighted with the pen I just bought. It is in good shape. I just flushed it out, filled it, and it writes like a dream. I am amazed at how well it writes--more smoothly than most of the pens I have. 

 

I came to this forum hoping to find more information about Esterbrook pens. I'm not sure where to look--the on-going exchanges presume a lot of knowledge about models, etc.. (I'm quite new to FPN, at least counting by how many times I've posted anything.) If anyone can point me in the direction of information about the various models of Esterbrooks, I would appreciate it. I'd like to identify the pen I have. It is just like the one Mom bought me, so it must date from the mid-fifties. Thanks.



#24 gweimer1

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:30

Your first stop should be at Brian Anderson's site. You'll learn a great deal there.

 

http://www.esterbrook.net/index.shtml



#25 Charles Skinner

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 15:57

Where can a find a list and description of all of the Esterbrooks nibs that are available?  C. S. 



#26 gweimer1

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 16:39

Where can a find a list and description of all of the Esterbrooks nibs that are available?  C. S. 

 

^^^^ Start with the link to Brian Anderson's site.  There is a section that lists the nibs.



#27 BuntyMcC

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 16:45

After getting a new fountain pen for Christmas I decided it was finally time to take a good look ar what I already had. One is an Esterbrook Safari Plunger fill (info source: Esterbrook.net) with a silver cap (made in USA), a 1551 nib, and a dark blue barrel (made in Canada.) I am having trouble figuring out how to fill it. Two strokes or one? Submerge the nib or not? And how will I know if the bladder needs replacing?

#28 gweimer1

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 18:16

I have a couple of those, and they do feel a little like a black box.  I pump it slowly a few times, with the nib submerged.  Then, if I have ink, I know it worked.  No real method other than that.  You can try it with water to get a feel for it, and to see how the pressure and flow look.  

I also have one that doesn't work, and I'm still trying to learn how to fix it.  As I understand (and there's a thread on these pens somewhere here), the diaphragm never really touches ink, so it lasts a very long time.  So far, I haven't even been able to get mine open to check.



#29 BuntyMcC

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 22:35

Thanks gweimer. When I get time (!) I'll try with water and if that is inconclusive, ink. I'll let you know.

#30 Gerry

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 09:36

I have a couple of those, and they do feel a little like a black box.  I pump it slowly a few times, with the nib submerged.  Then, if I have ink, I know it worked.  No real method other than that.  You can try it with water to get a feel for it, and to see how the pressure and flow look.  

I also have one that doesn't work, and I'm still trying to learn how to fix it.  As I understand (and there's a thread on these pens somewhere here), the diaphragm never really touches ink, so it lasts a very long time.  So far, I haven't even been able to get mine open to check.

 

Your fill technique is correct.  That's pretty much all that there is to it.

 

Regarding the ink sac, it's not really referred to as a diaghpram, which is the Parker Vacumatic sophistry.  Esterbrook sac's definitely do touch the ink, or rather the ink touches them, with little negative effect AFAIK. <smile>.

 

To open your Estie, try to remove the section - it isn't (or shouldn't be glued in) and isn't threaded.  Usually it can be removed by twisting - sometimes heat is necessary.

 

With the section removed, the sac, and it's condition can be evaluated easily.

 

Welcome to the Esterbrook forum.

 

Gerry



#31 gweimer1

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 17:34

 

Your fill technique is correct.  That's pretty much all that there is to it.

 

Regarding the ink sac, it's not really referred to as a diaghpram, which is the Parker Vacumatic sophistry.  Esterbrook sac's definitely do touch the ink, or rather the ink touches them, with little negative effect AFAIK. <smile>.

 

To open your Estie, try to remove the section - it isn't (or shouldn't be glued in) and isn't threaded.  Usually it can be removed by twisting - sometimes heat is necessary.

 

With the section removed, the sac, and it's condition can be evaluated easily.

 

Welcome to the Esterbrook forum.

 

Gerry

 

 

There's always that key phrase.    B)

 

Thanks for the info.  I'll dig into mine again.








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