Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Does Pelikan Make A Flex Stub Nib?

pelikan flex stub

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 HalloweenHJB

HalloweenHJB

    More color!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,258 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2014 - 19:44

I hope I'm not asking a silly question, or one that has been answered repeatedly before, but I wonder if there is such a thing as a Pelikan flex stub nib.  I love the way that Pelikan nibs are easily exchangeable, so I was hoping a person could order one.

 

I have an "oblique" nib on one of my little M200s, but I really have never liked the scratchiness of it.  Any suggestions for a more giving nib for any of the 200, 400 or 600 models?

 

THANKS!



Sponsored Content

#2 playtime

playtime

    Flexible

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 595 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2014 - 20:04

I'd search for a vintage pelikan nib, fit either for the 100N or for the 400/400N/400NN, and mount it on your 200. It should fit - though I'd check Richard Binder's site to verify. Vintage pelikan nibs are wondrously semi-flexible, and the broader as well as oblique cut nibs are often more stubbish than the irridium spheres of today's nibs.

 

As for the 400 and 600, i believe 14K nibs still abound - secure one if you do not have them already and send it to a nibmeister for added flex and a stubbish tip....

 

Bo bo, I believe this is where you can certainly chime in and offer us your well-weighed observations:)!!

 

J


Edited by playtime, 21 May 2014 - 20:15.

"Writing is 1/3 nib width & flex, 1/3 paper and 1/3 ink. In that order."Bo Bo Olson

"No one needs to rotate a pen while using an oblique, in fact, that's against the whole concept of an oblique, which is to give you shading without any special effort."Professor Propas, 24 December 2010

 

"IMHO, the only advantage of the 149 is increased girth if needed, increased gold if wanted and increased prestige if perceived.  I have three, but hardly ever use them.  After all, they hold the same amount of ink as a 146."FredRydr, 12 March 2015

 

"Surely half the pleasure of life is sardonic comment on the passing show."Sir Peter Strawson


#3 HalloweenHJB

HalloweenHJB

    More color!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,258 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2014 - 21:00

I'd search for a vintage pelikan nib, fit either for the 100N or for the 400/400N/400NN, and mount it on your 200. It should fit - though I'd check Richard Binder's site to verify. 

Thanks so much for the tip.  I'll check it out and see what I can find...   :)



#4 playtime

playtime

    Flexible

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 595 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2014 - 23:49

penboard.de or martiniauctions.com

 

 

Thanks so much for the tip.  I'll check it out and see what I can find...   :)


"Writing is 1/3 nib width & flex, 1/3 paper and 1/3 ink. In that order."Bo Bo Olson

"No one needs to rotate a pen while using an oblique, in fact, that's against the whole concept of an oblique, which is to give you shading without any special effort."Professor Propas, 24 December 2010

 

"IMHO, the only advantage of the 149 is increased girth if needed, increased gold if wanted and increased prestige if perceived.  I have three, but hardly ever use them.  After all, they hold the same amount of ink as a 146."FredRydr, 12 March 2015

 

"Surely half the pleasure of life is sardonic comment on the passing show."Sir Peter Strawson


#5 HalloweenHJB

HalloweenHJB

    More color!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,258 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 22 May 2014 - 00:12

penboard.de or martiniauctions.com

 

 

I'm in the USA, so are there sites closer to home (Chicago or midwest?), with prices in dollars?  I don't mind ordering from Europe, but the exchange from euros (and the charges from the credit card company) can be brutal.  Thanks in advance for your continued help...


Edited by HalloweenHJB, 22 May 2014 - 00:13.


#6 Ghost Plane

Ghost Plane

    Indescribable

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28,424 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Flag:

Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:06

The M1000 nibs are soft (but not flexes) unlike the rest of the modern Pels. A BB or O3B might be of interest, but they're not cheap.

#7 HalloweenHJB

HalloweenHJB

    More color!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,258 posts
  • Location:Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:50

The M1000 nibs are soft (but not flexes) unlike the rest of the modern Pels. A BB or O3B might be of interest, but they're not cheap.

Thanks, but I don't have an M1000;  the largest I have is M600.  I did find some options at Richards Pens [http://www.richardsp...e=pens/nibs.htm] and you're right:   none of the Pelikan nibs are ever cheap!



#8 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,622 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 24 May 2014 - 17:42

Do you cant your nib 15 or more degrees when using you Oblique...if you don't it will be scratchy.

 

You have the pen...now you need the nib.

A '50's .to pre'66 nib will be "stubbish" in the nib has no American Bump under....is a flat grind.

In my modern (2005) 605 I'm using a semi-flex B from my '55 400n...oh... :puddle:  Now that is what you want. :drool:

 

I really love my 140's semi-flex OB. B and OB back then are narrower than modern...are writing nibs not just signature nibs.

Real oblique nibs are from 1950-65...they have some flex....semi-flex or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex. They are all flatter bottomed...no American Bump under..."stubbish"

 

 Modern Stub is normally nail, in you have max line variation all the time.

With vintage German stubbish pens with a tad of flex....ie "Not Flex pens", you have some line variation, but line variation on demand.

 

Your modern oblique is only for left handers or folks that have left eye dominance and hold thier nib canted....crooked.

It has nothing to do with real line variation.

That was rant 9,967 on that.

A 140 nib is too small it looks dorky...a '50's 400 or 400NN nib works great.

 

Personally I'd not waste a cent on post '97 nibs....rant 6,503 on that. Buy good nibs....'83-97 for 1/2 a size narrower than modern (which is semi-nail and blobby), real true semi-vintage springy regular flex. Pre'66 for nibs with semi-flex or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex.

Rick Propas or Penboard.De are some of the places you can look for fine nibs.

Good luck

 


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 24 May 2014 - 18:29.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#9 PJohnP

PJohnP

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,100 posts

Posted 24 May 2014 - 18:28

There are a few things to comment on here...

 

The "scratchiness" is something that many people address by very gently working with the nib on any of several materials/surfaces to smooth the nib.  Some folks prefer to have another person address these problems for them.  I've smoothed a fair number of nibs, including one on a pen sent as a gift to a very good friend, and it's not onerous, perhaps tedious due to the slow nature of this for the amateur who doesn't want to destroy a nib.  There are a variety of topics scattered around FPN that address the various approaches with the pros and cons (opinions) of each of the approaches.

 

"Modern" Pelikans don't come with flex and stub nibs.  There are Pelikan italic nibs on some new pens, with various opinions on how "stubbish" or "crisp" these are, but most of the newer italic nibs tend to be a bit broad in flat strokes.  I personally found the M205 italic to be excessively wide for my use, but, once again, opinions differ.

 

Bo Bo has commented on vintage nibs, but these are not as easy to obtain as in years past.  I have vintage 400/400NN nibs with a great deal of springiness to them, but I'd personally consider these "semi-flex" in nature, not full flex.  I'm pretty much in accord with Bo Bo's comments that there are some very definite limits on the vintage nibs' flex nature.  Having said that, I know that what many people consider "flex" is not "full flex" or "maximum flex", so it's entirely possible that the vintage nibs would suit your needs.  I'd recommend trying to attend a pen show or a Pen Posse meeting locally to see if the vintage nibs are a viable option for you.  If there isn't a pen group meeting in Indianapolis, perhaps you could start one.

 

If none of that suffices, you're on your way to seeing a "nibmeister" to make over a nib to your needs.  I've been extremely pleased with the work of John Mottishaw, Deb Kinney, and Pendleton Brown for various work performed on nib adaptations, but these have been modifications to become a moderate cursive italic nib, more crisp than a stub, but not "razor sharp" crisp.  Each of the nibs by each nibmeister has had slightly different, but entirely enjoyable characteristics.  I know that various nibmeisters have specific turnaround times, with some getting rather lengthy now.  Pendleton shows up at many pen shows ready to grind right "on-the-spot" - he took care of several nibs, Pelikan and Sheaffer, for me at the 2013 LAPS, and they have been delightful to write with since the show.  He's also a thoroughly great guy to meet in person, even if you don't end up having him grind a nib, so there's no downside at all on looking him up at a show.  You can find several other pen builder/repair/nibmeisters here on FPN, but I can't comment on them from personal experience.

 

 

 

 

John P.


Edited by PJohnP, 24 May 2014 - 18:30.


#10 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,622 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 24 May 2014 - 19:40

Really, turning your oblique nib...canting it is necessary (& then re-gripping). I had a Mercedes semi-flex OM that was scratchy until I canted the nib.

I have a Lamy 27 nail, that I stupidly even tried to smooth before I realized it was an oblique nib...and needed to be canted/turned 15 degrees before gripping the pen. Scratchy over.

Not expecting it I had not gave it a good look.

An Oblique nib needs to be set in your hand the amount of grind an re-gripped; be that 15 or 30 degrees of the grind.

 

I have 26 semi-flex and 14 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex (14 or so of both those flex sets in Oblique..in both @15&30 degree grinds)...and they spread their tines only 3 X a light down stroke (true regular flex is also a max 3 X a light down stroke)...they are not Flex nibs...that spread their tines 4-5-6 or even 7 X a light down stroke...

 

That flex chain of semi-flex, 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex: easy full flex, wet noodle and weak kneed wet noodle has to do with ease of tine spread too.

One must be careful not to over flex any nib.

I defiantly don't want any one taking a semi-flex and trying to make it do Olympic splits...when they don't understand the semi...in the flex...thinking it's a Hunt 99 dip pen nib.

 

I always suggest working one's way up the flex chain....but many wish to jump into the deep end of the pool with out their water wings...now.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 24 May 2014 - 19:42.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pelikan, flex, stub



Sponsored Content




|