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Buying An S.t. Dupont Online, Fakes And Other Challenges

dupont fake counterfeit s.t. dupont

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#1 just Andrew

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 05:46

Greetings.

 

There's such a wealth of information on this site that I decided this would be the best place to seek advise on this matter. The TL;DR (ie. "too long, didn't read" version) of it is: how can I reliably differentiate a real S.T. Dupont pen from a fake, based on studying the pictures alone in an online listing (particularly of the box and paperwork)? When exactly did S.T. Dupont eschew the red presentation box in favor of the black box?

 

And here's the "mindless drivel" version (any photos below are "borrowed" for the purpose of this discussion, they are not my own):

 

As a kid I've always admired fine wristwatches and fine pens. My dad has a pair of Pelikans (a pen and pencil set) which he used for many years, and still uses them now, and I used to look at all the pictures of intricately-designed fountain pens in those glossy magazines. Now I've crossed the big Three-O and have been working for a number of years (in an unsavory environment not actually suited to fine pens). Those intricately-designed pens are still beyond me, but I've decided that it is time to look for a nice pen. It has to be a rollerball or a ballpoint because my terrible handwriting would do no justice to a fountain pen, and partly also because I would like to use this pen for writing, not just for signatures.

 

On a recent vacation back in my hometown, I glanced through the windows of the local S.T. Dupont boutique store in a big shopping centre and saw the Orient Express Prestige Fountain Pen, which is probably the most beautiful piece of man-made corruption I've ever laid my eyes on. The brand itself however, was unknown to me and up to that point, I only knew of Montblancs [...because, who doesn't...] and Pelikans. I spoke about it briefly to my dad who recalls that some of his colleagues did use S.T. Dupont pens.

 

dupontorientexpress_zpsd7614c12.jpg

 

Instead of stepping into that boutique, I gloated at the display for a while before going for lunch, deciding not to embarass myself by walking into a store selling items that I clearly could not afford. And so it was a surprise that during some research later on, I found a goodly amount of new, NOS and second-hand Duponts on sale at an evil online site, some of which were to my liking and well within my means. In the process I learned about the Chinese lacquer that S.T. Dupont uses on some of their products, something that really piqued my interest and firmly set me down the path of buying my first fine pen. It will be an S.T. Dupont pen and it must feature large expanses of Chinese lacquer.

 

As I was made aware by information on this site, as well as others on the internet, there were numerous counterfeit pens on the market, some of them marketed by apparently credible vendors with an extensive and sound rating who many not even be aware that their stock was not legit. I trawled through numerous listings and realized that the greatest challenge was finding a pen that I liked, and that I could be reasonably certain was legit based on pictures alone rather than handling the pen in person.

 

As such I seek advise from people at this forum who are much more knowledgeable about these things.

 

My understanding is that counterfeits have become very good over the years and it can be nearly impossible to tell from the genuine item. However I was wondering if there were any "tell tale" signs that a pen was a fake. Besides studying as close as possible, the fit and finish of a pen in the photos (sometimes difficult since the photos are sometimes not close enough, or worse, blurred), are there any other visible signs I should look for in paperwork or even the box, if those are available as part of the sale?

 

In the older red-boxed pens which were clearly being sold as featuring Chinese lacquer or "laque de chine", I've occasionally seen outer boxes (ie. the paper box that protects the inner presentation box) that have a line of Chinese lacquer symbols (ie. the leaf) running along the upper edge of four sides of the box (ie. front, back, left and right).

 

dupontpenredpacket2_zpsc09c13e1.jpg

 

Some other outer boxes do not have this feature. On the inner red presentation box itself, I have also seen some that have the line of leaf symbols running along the sides of the lid, while some boxes do not have it. Are they both genuine and the difference is simply a change of design? Should all the older laque de chine models feature the lacquer leaf symbol on both boxes?

 

dupontredboxnoleaf_zps88a645d3.jpg

 

The newer Dupont pens now seem to come in black boxes with a purple liner. These appear even more difficult to study because they all look the same to my ill-informed eye. When did they make the change to use black boxes instead of red ones?

 

I have also read an article that makes a sweeping remark to say that genuine pens always fit well into a customized area in a "cushion" inside the presentation box, while pens that are held in place by only a ribbon are likely to be counterfeit. How true is this statement? It is difficult for me to believe this since I do see a lot of pens presented in either fashion.

 

Finally, some of the older NOS/ little used red-boxed pens may on occasion, have their paperwork contained in a red package that itself features a line of Chinese lacquer symbols, as in the picture below. Assuming that nothing is missing from the box, is this an item I should look for in a genuine item or is it the hallmark of a counterfeit?

 

dupontpenredpacket_zpsa0f5570a.jpg

 

Are there any other things that I should be on a lookout for to differentiate a fake for the real thing? Or am I simply imagining that is possible to safely purchase a genuine Dupont pen at an online auction site?

 

Thank you. Any advise would be most appreciated.



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#2 FayeV

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 07:17

These are good questions and I look forward to reading the responses from more experienced folks. I've browsed online auction sites on and off and have avoided bidding on pens (and other items) due to inexperience in spotting fakes. (However there was one pen I saw which was clearly a fake).

I bought mine from a store. Back then, I had heard of Montblanc -- everyone recognized their logo -- but had never heard of Dupont before. I liked the look of this one pen, tried it out in the store, really liked the design and how it felt, and ended up buying it on a whim. Well, I justified splurging a little since I graduated from school and found a job. LOL. I get the impression that this is an unpopular brand since there is so little talk about it on this forum. I'm really happy with my pen, it is a pleasure to write with, I can't put my finger on it so I'll just call it the "little attention to details". I'm open to saving up for another Dupont purchase; I just don't know where I'd buy it from to ensure getting the real thing. :unsure:


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#3 just Andrew

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:26

These are good questions and I look forward to reading the responses from more experienced folks. I've browsed online auction sites on and off and have avoided bidding on pens (and other items) due to inexperience in spotting fakes. (However there was one pen I saw which was clearly a fake).

I bought mine from a store. Back then, I had heard of Montblanc -- everyone recognized their logo -- but had never heard of Dupont before. I liked the look of this one pen, tried it out in the store, really liked the design and how it felt, and ended up buying it on a whim. Well, I justified splurging a little since I graduated from school and found a job. LOL. I get the impression that this is an unpopular brand since there is so little talk about it on this forum. I'm really happy with my pen, it is a pleasure to write with, I can't put my finger on it so I'll just call it the "little attention to details". I'm open to saving up for another Dupont purchase; I just don't know where I'd buy it from to ensure getting the real thing. :unsure:

Is that the Vertigo that is featured in your profile picture? That is a absolute beaut, wish I could use one too.



#4 jar

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 14:23

Actually, everything you mention as things to watch for are often found on the fakes.

 

It's near impossible to tell just from pictures whether an ST Dupont pen is a fake. Even folk that are really familiar with the marque can get fooled until they have the item in hand.

 

In a post in this thread I describe how I got fooled.

 

The test of an ST Dupont product is not in the things that show but rather in the attention to detail of even those mundane things that don't show.  It's in the feel when capping or uncapping an Olympio/Orpheo; it's the sound the clip on an Ellipsis makes when you pull it out of your pocket; it's the fit and finish inside and in areas that don't show; the ping when opening the cap on a Ligne 2 lighter; the depth of the lacquer.

 

There are a few things that are signs of a fake.

 

A Fidelio model pen with an 18K nib is a fake.

 

An Olympio/Orpheo with an open style nib is a fake.

 

A Classique, Gatsby, Montparnasse that uses standard international cartridges or converters is a fake.

 

 


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#5 just Andrew

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 03:17

Thanks for the advice, Jar. Also, I read the thread in your link and it's worrying to see how difficult it can be to tell a fake from the real thing, short of them being side by side. It's starting to sound that buying from anything other than an authorized dealer is akin to walking in a minefield. Or I could take a calculated gamble by buying from a vendor with a good return policy. This will be more risky than I thought.



#6 jar

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 13:58

Thanks for the advice, Jar. Also, I read the thread in your link and it's worrying to see how difficult it can be to tell a fake from the real thing, short of them being side by side. It's starting to sound that buying from anything other than an authorized dealer is akin to walking in a minefield. Or I could take a calculated gamble by buying from a vendor with a good return policy. This will be more risky than I thought.

If you buy the seller instead of the pen you will almost always do okay.  I can tell you that reputable sellers face the same problems you face and they do try to research authenticity.  A general rule is the old "If it sounds too good..." but unfortunately I see too many fakes being sold at authentic prices.


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#7 rwilsonedn

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 19:34

This does not at all respond to your question. But given your obvious appreciation of craftsmanship and your sensitivity to detail, I wonder if you might not want to reconsider getting a fountain pen. A fine pen like an ST Dupont would certainly be suitable for long periods of writing, with less fatigue than you would experience with any sort of ball pen. It wouldn't just be for signatures. And because fountain pens give so much tactile pleasure as you write, many people find that after they get a pen they love, they begin to improve their handwriting as well. It's something about the feather-light touch, the feel of nib on paper, the flow and sudden drying of liquid, even the scent of the ink: it naturally leads to slowing down, relaxing your arm, and gracefully drawing the letters. You might find that writing with a fountain pen is every bit as enjoyable as owning a Dupont. And over time, your careful writing for enjoyment becomes your everyday handwriting.

In any case, good luck on your quest, and enjoy. Oh ... and post pictures when you find your pen.

ron



#8 mjhullett

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 20:41

So I just bought a fantastic ST Dupont from the internet, but what I did was look for used pens on local retailers websites and then inspect them myself and rely on their expertise and reputation. So maybe try to find a local shop?


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#9 just Andrew

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 01:00

Thanks everyone for the advise so far. Although I am new to this forum I am feeling most welcome here. All of your responses have been warm and helpful.
 

If you buy the seller instead of the pen you will almost always do okay.  I can tell you that reputable sellers face the same problems you face and they do try to research authenticity.  A general rule is the old "If it sounds too good..." but unfortunately I see too many fakes being sold at authentic prices.

 

That's sound logic, and some sellers project themselves as being more trustworthy than others. There are one or two sellers dumping a multitude of these pens on the market at the moment for incredibly low prices, some of them with designs that do not appear prevalent with other sellers. But as you say, it's the fakes that sell for 'real' prices that are less obvious. For better or worse, I've generally skipped the listings that have poor pictures or limited descriptions (apart from seller feedback). Murky pictures for a genuine Dupont? Maybe, but I couldn't risk it.

 

This does not at all respond to your question. But given your obvious appreciation of craftsmanship and your sensitivity to detail, I wonder if you might not want to reconsider getting a fountain pen. A fine pen like an ST Dupont would certainly be suitable for long periods of writing, with less fatigue than you would experience with any sort of ball pen. It wouldn't just be for signatures. And because fountain pens give so much tactile pleasure as you write, many people find that after they get a pen they love, they begin to improve their handwriting as well. It's something about the feather-light touch, the feel of nib on paper, the flow and sudden drying of liquid, even the scent of the ink: it naturally leads to slowing down, relaxing your arm, and gracefully drawing the letters. You might find that writing with a fountain pen is every bit as enjoyable as owning a Dupont. And over time, your careful writing for enjoyment becomes your everyday handwriting.

In any case, good luck on your quest, and enjoy. Oh ... and post pictures when you find your pen.

ron

 

Great advise. Admittedly I never thought of it that way but it's true: a pen that I truly enjoy using could be the impetus to improving my writing technique. At the moment it's typical "doctor's handwriting" (not saying I'm a doctor, but that's what people call it when they see it), it's ugly and misshapen, and few people seem to be able to read it. It was a challenge writing essay-long answers for exams back in the days I was still at university.

After much careful consideration I've still decided to go for a rollerball as a first, and I'm sure it will be the start of a new addiction and lead to the purchase of more. The first pen needs to be something that I can truly use under most circumstances, is reasonably durable (or can at least withstand some accidents from regular use) and is low maintenance. It will definitely be kept away from my workplace (a veterinary clinic) and the associated animal secretions and discharge as this is the domain where throwaway biros will thrive. However this pen will need to be something I can use especially for note-taking during seminars, especially when I need to write small and in between the lines of printed notes.

 

Also I am even more apprehensive about buying fountain pens online based on pictures alone because there is more that can go wrong with the nib, and it is not as easily replaced as a refill. For my second pen I will stretch the budget and do a very patient search for a fountain pen I could buy from a reputable seller, after inspecting it and testing it in person.

When I was really young I used to be into the practice of writing journal articles, which I did mostly for the pleasure of exercising the right side of my brain rather than the joy of documenting mundane and insignificant things. These days of course, I am on forums of various sorts far too much and hardly ever write any more which is a shame. When my handwriting is less embarrassing, perhaps I'll start a blog featuring actual handwritten articles rather than pixels like the usual cases. Thanks again for your comment and it's given me some great ideas I could use.

 

When I do get that pen I will definitely be posting the photos here, photography being another hobby. I understand there is a separate forum here for introductions, but I would rather post here as a follow up.

 

So I just bought a fantastic ST Dupont from the internet, but what I did was look for used pens on local retailers websites and then inspect them myself and rely on their expertise and reputation. So maybe try to find a local shop?

 

Agreed. At the moment I'm working in Australia (Singapore being my hometown) and I managed to track down a few local retailers for ST Dupont, amongst other distinguished marques. The key trouble I'm having is with the price. I suspect the taxes here have made the price of luxury items (or essentially anything that is "non essential") too rich for my blood. Yes, I am willing to pay for quality of craftsmanship, heritage and performance, but the difference in price between that which retails locally and that which retails online (assuming comparisons with known legitimate sellers) is eye-watering. I could potentially buy something "mid-ranged" online for the same sum as what I would pay for "entry-level" in Australia.

 

There is a possibility of planning another trip back to Singapore in the near future and I may use that as an excuse to pick up a pen (perhaps my second, which will definitely be a fountain pen) while on vacation, but since I declined to step into that boutique on a recent vacation, I have yet to determine if pricing is any more fair in Singapore than it is in Australia.



#10 EclecticCollector

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 23:44

just Andrew, I also suggest that you reconsider whether a fountain pen is something suitable for more than just signing your name to important documents. I myself use one every day at work, including for taking notes at my many meetings.

 

For your consideration, I attach here photos that I have just taken of my own Olympio laque du chine which I purchased from a reputable, authorized dealer in 2002. As can be seen, my packaging does not have the leaf symbol all around and the internal folder holding the paperwork is different. This is not to say that the variations are fakes, as I have no knowledge of earlier packaging designs, but I can confirm that the "cushion" is exactly the size and shape of the pen (in reality it's just a felt covered plastic tray). Further, the model number appears no fewer than three times: on both ends of the outside carton (one end of which should also include the serial number of the pen, which I have whited out) and as a sticker inside. I believe the sticker is meant to be affixed to the warranty booklet.

 

[attachment=257176:dupont_olympio_carton.jpg]

[attachment=257175:dupont_olympio_boxends.jpg]

[attachment=257177:dupont_olympio_carton_open.jpg]

[attachment=257180:dupont_olympio_inner_boxes.jpg]

[attachment=257181:dupont_olympio_papers.jpg]

[attachment=257178:dupont_olympio_booklets.jpg]

[attachment=257179:dupont_olympio_cards.jpg]

[attachment=257182:dupont_olympio_pen_box.jpg]

 



#11 EclecticCollector

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 23:52

I get the impression that this is an unpopular brand since there is so little talk about it on this forum. I'm really happy with my pen, it is a pleasure to write with, I can't put my finger on it so I'll just call it the "little attention to details".

I know exactly what you mean. Their pens, despite (or maybe because of?) being hand made, have the highest level of craftsmanship of all the high end brands in my experience. Among Montegrappa, Visconti, Montblanc, Omas, etc. only my Duponts have been consistently perfect and their designs are elegantly reserved without being boring. I wish they were better recognized.


Edited by EclecticCollector, 18 May 2014 - 23:53.


#12 BillLS

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 02:15

For what it's worth, here's my buying history on S. T. Dupont pens.

 

One pen purchased new from Fountain Pen Hospital.

One pen purchased used from Pendemonium.

One pen purchased at a pen show.

One pen purchased from a reputable dealer on the Pentrace Green Board.

Seven pens purchased from the FPN Marketplace.

 

All eleven pens appear to be genuine. But then I'm extremely careful about who I purchase these pens from. I have 418 pens in my collection, 200 of which came from eBay. Note that none of the Duponts came from eBay.


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#13 just Andrew

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 11:09

just Andrew, I also suggest that you reconsider whether a fountain pen is something suitable for more than just signing your name to important documents. I myself use one every day at work, including for taking notes at my many meetings.

 

For your consideration, I attach here photos that I have just taken of my own Olympio laque du chine which I purchased from a reputable, authorized dealer in 2002. As can be seen, my packaging does not have the leaf symbol all around and the internal folder holding the paperwork is different. This is not to say that the variations are fakes, as I have no knowledge of earlier packaging designs, but I can confirm that the "cushion" is exactly the size and shape of the pen (in reality it's just a felt covered plastic tray). Further, the model number appears no fewer than three times: on both ends of the outside carton (one end of which should also include the serial number of the pen, which I have whited out) and as a sticker inside. I believe the sticker is meant to be affixed to the warranty booklet.

 

It is likely that this is going to turn into a slippery slope as I just purchased a rollerball and it's inbound as we speak. Both your comment and that from Ron as above have made me do a double-take on my purchase even before it has arrived! ;) There will definitely be a fountain pen in the future and I am sure this one will not be the last.

 

It just boggles the mind as to how many variations there are in packaging, even amongst the 'older' Dupont pens and that is what makes it so hard to decipher what is real and what is not.

 

For what it's worth, here's my buying history on S. T. Dupont pens.

 

One pen purchased new from Fountain Pen Hospital.

One pen purchased used from Pendemonium.

One pen purchased at a pen show.

One pen purchased from a reputable dealer on the Pentrace Green Board.

Seven pens purchased from the FPN Marketplace.

 

All eleven pens appear to be genuine. But then I'm extremely careful about who I purchase these pens from. I have 418 pens in my collection, 200 of which came from eBay. Note that none of the Duponts came from eBay.

 

For better or worse, I just bought a Dupont on eBay. I contemplated the purchase for quite some time (even before posting this thread), studying numerous listings. Eventually I decided this one was "legit enough" (going based on the pictures, the seller's feedback and the return policyt) to bite the bullet and do it. Now I just have to wait for the package to arrive and it will soon be obvious as to whether this is my greatest faux pas. If everything goes sour, I will have to fall back on the return policy.

 

I will consider searching the marketplace here for my second purchase. I might have missed something, but a recent search there did not bring up any Dupont pens, which is just unfortunate.


Edited by just Andrew, 19 May 2014 - 11:09.


#14 EclecticCollector

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 19:02

I browse the classifieds from time to time and can confirm that, in my short time of being a member here, I cannot recall having seen any Duponts listed.

Reading back I see that you work at a vet's office; I have to agree that a fine fountain pen may not be the best tool for your situation and that a rollerball may be the better choice after all. :) The wonderful thing is that we're not limited to owning only one writing instrument. I myself have a rollerball collection almost the same size as my fountain pens. Whatever you end up deciding on, I hope it brings enjoyment to you!

#15 just Andrew

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 04:17

Thanks again, everyone. As promised, here is an update. After scouring numerous listings on the internet and pondering over the purchase for days (in effect sleeping over it), I finally found a pen that I seemed reasonably certain of being genuine and bought it. After that it was an [im]patient wait for another 2 weeks before it finally arrived in the post. None of the photos in my first post were from the listing of the pen that I eventually bought, but it does have some characteristics that are shared with those photos. Here is a quick n' dirty photo of the entire package:

 

DSCF4364_zps4d9f9dd6.jpg

 

In that little leaflet titled Centres de Service, it has a date printed in it "Mars 2003". I'm not sure if this is at all indicative of the approximate age of this pen, but it was essentially in NOS condition. Curiously, the pen wrote exactly as a ballpoint would, straight out of the box. It was then I realized that the pen had actually been fitted with a jumbo sized ballpoint refill with the number "307" on it. And there was a sealed, brand new rollerball refill numbered "310" seated underneath the pen cushion, together with a carrying sleeve.

 

In the future I will definitely need to buy more rollerball refills. Is "310" the model number that I should use when buying or will any S.T. Dupont rollerball refill be suitable? Based on measurements, this is the mid-sized or "Large" Orpheo/ Olympio, measuring approximately 142mm when capped.

 

Now I'm just a pleb who has never handled an S.T. Dupont before, so I'm not actually in the position to say if this pen is a fake or whether it really is the real thing, but there are just too many signs that it is indeed the latter. When I was a fresh graduate looking for my first job, "attention to detail" was one of the ways I tried to sell myself on a CV. Well, this S.T. Dupont rollerball pen is "attention to detail" manifest. It is a substantial writing instrument that oozes a feeling of elegance and quiet confidence with its polished mirror-like cap, "collar ring" and base, with a solid brass barrel coated in a reflective jet-black layer of Chinese lacquer.

 

And here is a more artistic attempt at photographing the pen:

 

DSCF4362_zps282bbbd1.jpg

 

The words "S.T. Dupont" and "Paris" are crisp and that line which runs circumferentially around the "collar" is well engraved with sharply beveled edges. The palladium plated pen cap is polished to perfection both inside and out, including all surfaces of the clip which is smartly spring-loaded. The words "laque de chine" near the top of the pen cap are sharply presented but not as unbelievably crisp as the words "Made in France" and the serial number on the clip, nor as bleeding sharp as the engraved shape of leaf of the lacquer tree at the top of the pen cap. The inside of the brass barrel is finished evenly (although not polished to a mirror-like finish like the inside of the pen cap) with lines that I presume originate from the machining process.

 

When posted, the pen feels top heavy, while simultaneously improving my handwriting. The action of the pen cap itself is a dream. It fits snugly onto the pen with very little play or wobble, and only turns with a degree of force is applied to it. It slips off in an almost noiseless fashion when tugged. When the cap is replaced, it centers and glides onto the pen for the last [less than a] centimeter or so before finally clicking shut against the "collar" of the pen. That addictive "click" this action makes is seemingly a fitting end to a finished piece of writing or the signing of a document, like the applause in response to a fine performance at a live concert. Indeed for this reason I was glad to have chosen to buy a rollerball model that features a pen cap instead of a ballpoint model that uses a twist action mechanism.

 

This pen has already been put through its paces in the last few days, with visible scratches added to its glorious cap. And I'm sure over time it will develop some patina from regular use. While I still have occasional regrets about not jumping straight to a fountain pen for my first purchase, when all things are considered, only a ballpoint or rollerball will give me the durability I require from a daily user (even if this pen is only to be used outside of the rigors of my workplace, and associated animal fur, claws, teeth and secretions). Compared to everything I have used in the past, this is unquestionably the ballpoint or rollerball par excellence.

 

And that handwritten blog I was thinking about starting...well, I just might do it after all. Thank you once again, folks, but this has got me hooked.

 

EDIT: corrected grave error in wording.


Edited by just Andrew, 02 June 2014 - 07:25.


#16 FayeV

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 05:25

Congrats on your first Dupont purchase!!!

I agree this is the better choice for your work environment.

Perhaps you might consider rewarding yourself with a fountain pen for home use, sometime in the future.


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#17 EclecticCollector

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 07:02

Congratulations! I'm sure that you have made the best choice for your situation, and there's no need to rush into a fountain pen before you're ready. I myself built up quite a large rollerball collection before I made the jump to fountains. I wish you many years of enjoyment with your new pen. I would encourage you to write with the cap unposted if it feels top heavy though; I find my Olympio to also be top heavy when posted and thus never do so.

(Just one slight correction, you wanted "latter" instead of "former", based on the order of your wording "former" would actually mean it's a fake! :))

Edited by EclecticCollector, 02 June 2014 - 07:04.


#18 just Andrew

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 07:24

Congrats on your first Dupont purchase!!!

I agree this is the better choice for your work environment.

Perhaps you might consider rewarding yourself with a fountain pen for home use, sometime in the future.

 

Thanks. At this time it appears most likely that my next pen will be from S.T. Dupont, especially given the experience I've had with their writing instruments, and it will certainly be a fountain pen. In life I have also tended to support the underdog and I think S.T. Dupont is certainly underrated for the superb products they offer. As with all fine things in life, they are never cheap and we certainly get what we pay for. But some things are just better value for money, in my opinion.

 

Congratulations! I'm sure that you have made the best choice for your situation, and there's no need to rush into a fountain pen before you're ready. I myself built up quite a large rollerball collection before I made the jump to fountains. I wish you many years of enjoyment with your new pen. I would encourage you to write with the cap unposted if it feels top heavy though; I find my Olympio to also be top heavy when posted and thus never do so.

(Just one slight correction, you wanted "latter" instead of "former", based on the order of your wording "former" would actually mean it's a fake! :))

 

Thank you. I would need to spend more time writing with this to decide if it is better posted or unposted. Posted, it seems to slow my writing a little which could in effect improve my handwriting. It's also a little more reassuring that misplacing the cap is less likely, and the pen will not roll off the table if I decide to leave the desk.

 

Haha, thanks for the correction, that is an embarrassing mistake and serves me right for writing this in between jobs. I will correct it immediately, especially since it should be in keeping with the promise in my CV as a fresh grad: "attention to detail"!



#19 gerigo

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 16:42

Congrats on your first purchase of the STDupont. It's a great pen company that should get more attention from FP lovers.

 

I know this is a bit off point, but I got into the world of Duponts recently because one of the guys at Fook Hing showed me a Defi. I had to get it because it had all the qualities I look for in a fountain pen.

 

One of the things I really like about the pen is the nib.

 

Although not specifically stated in their marketing material, I feel it's designed specifically for people who are new to fountain pens. It's super smooth, very easy to write with, and very easy to maintain with the cartridge converter system. It really reminds me of writing with one of those roller ball liquid ink pens, because of the tubular stainless steel nib. You might want to consider it for your entry into the fountain pen world.

 

Don't be put off by the price or the fact you're "only" getting a stainless steel nib. It's superbly put together, like all STDuponts. A class above all pens.



#20 EclecticCollector

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 19:48

gerigo, does your Defi make a slight rattling sound if you gently shake it from side to side? It doesn't seem to affect the functionality of the pen but is slightly disconcerting.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: dupont, fake, counterfeit, s.t. dupont



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