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Entry Level . . . For Pelikan

pelikan m200 pelikan m400 pelikan m600

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#1 AustinMalone1999

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 21:54

I have collected many mid-level pens recently. I want to get a Pelikan, I just want a smooth writer with some spring when I get bored in class. I do not have a pen pouch, Pelikan remedies that.

 

My question is, should I go for the 200, 400, or 600. I like all mediums, German and Japanese. Which one will provide me with enough spring, which is the best value, and which one is ideal for a student? Do they tend to be wet or dry? What finishes do you recommend? 



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#2 h.farmawi

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 22:12

I don't have one but from the reviews... i would say the 400 and if you have large hands i would say the 600, the 200 is too small and i think its not worth the price i would like to get a 600 myself but a 400 would also be nice.
good luck!

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#3 The Blue Knight

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 22:26

I really look of the sovereign really classy dare I say it a step ahead of Meisterstuck range in terms of design. But they are high end pens so demand high end prices. I'd love to own an M600 however I could never imagine spending any more then £100 on a pen until I graduate so for me the M200 is the only accessible pen at the moment. It's annoying it doesn't come in the classic stripped green of the rest of the range. So I may buy an M215 in the next year as I would really like to own a Pelikan.

 

Just out of interest is this a like a graduation gift or something or are you actually considering one for EDC? 



#4 RMN

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 22:40

If you want a nib with "spring" you have to go for the m1000, which is really different from the smaller pens in the series. But that is quite a chunk of money....

 

I am not familiar with the smaller sizes, they are too light for my tastes.

 

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#5 Scribblesoften

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 22:54

Entry level modern Pelikans are the 150 and 200. Vintage entry level were the 120 and 140. The 200 is a good all rounder. I actually prefer the steel nib of the 200 to the gold nib of the 400. The 200 and 400 are identical in size. The 400 uses a bit nicer materials and, to my eye, seems a bit better put together. All four of these pens are not huge. If you write posted any of them should work fine for you. The earlier pens (120s, 140s) usually had springier nibs than the modern pens. The steel nib on the 200 still has a bit of spring to it. The medium I have on my 640 is stiff.

Edited by Scribblesoften, 11 May 2014 - 22:58.


#6 sargetalon

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 23:04

The M200 and M400 are the same size. You don't get a step up until the M600 but that's not a huge step for the price. If you're looking for entry level, go for the M200 or M205. These nibs are gold plated stainless steel and write very nicely. They are wetter writers. They come in black, marbled green, clear demonstrator, and an amber colored demo in the current production of the M200's. Good luck with whatever you decide. Best advice is try to get to a shop to try before you buy.

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#7 superglueshoe

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 23:05

I really like the m200, pretty robust and quite smooth with a bit of spring. Some people say the m400 nib is really stiff because of the dimensions of that nib and the m600 costs quite a bit.

#8 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 23:11

+10 Scribbles often.

 

I would suggest a nice springy regular flex '83-97 400 over a over a nice regular flex  200 that can be as good as a Pelikan 120 or a bit better as good as a '90's 400 springy regular flex....and a 200 over a modern 400 semi-nail.

 

The modern 400/600 nibs are a half a width wider, with a blobbier line, half a stiffness stiffer....semi-nail instead of regular flex.

 

A '83-97 400 is not expensive....a new 400 certainly is.

 

Luckily I live in Germany so watch German Ebay...being retired had to watch my money...and was getting lots of nice semi-vintage and vintage pens at affordable prices.

There for I missed the substandard nib on a 400...got one on my 605.

Of course if all you want in the world is butter smooth....a 400 will give you a nice fat butter smooth semi-nail.

It can be sent to a nib meister and made thinner and up to semi-flex. (reason I don't buy very pretty 600's. I want more than simple butter smooth. )

 

I'd just buy a 140 :drool: semi-flex :puddle: as first choice..

 

Back in the '50's a medium small, long posting pen was In, in Germany...the 140, Kaweco Dia, and Geha's top of the line 760 was the same size as the 140.

These semi-flex pens post as long as a standard sized 200/400.

 

The single 1000 I tried was semi-flex....springy is vague...with the 200....is is only springy in the regular flex range. It does like vintage regular flex spread it's tines 3 X a light down stroke....when mashed.

 

A springy nib like a Falcon (often called soft) or a modern MB is springy...tines bend well but tine spread is only 2 X a light down stroke. That is it's own flex set...A bit more tine bend combined with a bit less tine spread...

Got one or two....got 26 semi-flexes, would not waste money on a pure "springy" nib....which has nothing to do with the spring of a very good regular flex nib.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 11 May 2014 - 23:16.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#9 flyingfox

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 23:14

LOL when I saw the title, Pelikano and Pelikan Future are the first things that entered my mind, but that's obviously not what you are looking for....  Still- it IS a great, reliable, fantastic entry level pen....  And- technically speaking, it is a good value and ideal for a student...  :lol: 



#10 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 00:26

I have the Merz & Krell 120 from the early 1970's, the M150 and the M205. Medium nibs in the M150/M205 and an Extra Fine in the 120. The 120 has an amazing nib. I have been looking at 140's lately. Just haven't won one yet.


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#11 carlos.q

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 01:23

My question is, should I go for the 200, 400, or 600. I like all mediums, German and Japanese. Which one will provide me with enough spring, which is the best value, and which one is ideal for a student? Do they tend to be wet or dry? What finishes do you recommend?

I recommend the Pelikan 200/205 as it ticks all your boxes: it has a springy steel nib, it's a good bang for your buck and it's ideal for a student (check the reviews here on FPN).
These pens tend to be wet writers so you'd better start out with a Pelikan 4001 ink.
As far as finishes it't up to to your taste: green marbled or black M200 or a Toledo red 205 are nice.

#12 Songyi

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 01:55

You can find M200s and M400s at pretty decent prices without taking the risk of vintage pens. I bought a blue marbled M200 for $68 on eBay and a black M400 for $175 shipped. If you have the patience and the repairing skills, go for a vintage 400NN, 120, etc., but I enjoy the luxury of a 3-year warranty and the somewhat-reassuring reliability of a modern pen (especially as a student).


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#13 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 10:55

Modern 400...has a fat blobby semi-nail nib.....Why spend good money on such a nib????

 

Buy a '83-97 400 one with out the ring by the piston....a nice springy regular flex nib; with a nice clean line. Well worth having and Pelikan will fix it...no BS about 3 year guarantee. That must be US Chartpack.

 

There might be pens from the 30-40's they don't fix....could be if it's more than just a nib ring, they might say no to some of the '50's stuff (don't know why they would, a plastic gasket is a plastic gasket).....but the modern stuff from '83 to now...they fix and don't charge money.

You may have to send it to Hanover....but what the hell.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 12 May 2014 - 10:57.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#14 Moshe ben David

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:54

I have two M2xx pens and a M800.  The M2xx are absolutely lighter in weight.  They, like the M800 are totally reliable writers, usually on the wet side.  I've never had any of the 3 dry up whilst still having ink in the barrel.  Also, I find all three of them to be silky smooth writers.

 

The M800 like the M1000 series are heavier due in part to the piston mechanism being brass rather than plastic.


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#15 fledermaus89

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 08:23

For me, the M200 was not springy at all, and M400 just a tad more flex, but still quite a nail. The M300 was quite a surprise as it had a very nice springy feeling to it coming from such a small nib. So in springiness, 300 >> 400 > 200. However, the M300's EF nib was more like a Japanese M and had some scratchiness and singing issues, so right now it's in Mike Masuyama's place to get reground. If you want the springiness, I would say go for either an M300 or vintage Pelikans. New 200 and 400s probably won't do it.



#16 Renfield

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 12:24

I don't have one but from the reviews... i would say the 400 and if you have large hands i would say the 600, the 200 is too small and i think its not worth the price i would like to get a 600 myself but a 400 would also be nice.
good luck!

 

 

The 200 and the 400 are exactly the same size. The only real difference, is the nib on the 200 is steel and the 400 is gold. (there are a few different finishes on the 400 as well)


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#17 AAAndrew

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 13:04

Back in 1999 I got a 250 and a 200. (it was "such a deal" I couldn't pass up) The 250 is rather plain, in my opinion as it's solid green and black. I liked the cheaper m200 with its swirly green better. I just swapped out the gold 250 nib for the steel one in the 200. Both are nice pens, and I really like the 250's nib from the late 90's. A wet, bouncy nib with the perfect amount of smoothness and a tiny bit of bite to give you great feedback on the paper. So, maybe a used 250 (which I don't think they make anymore) would be a good bet. I see a demonstrator being offered, in box, right now on the 'bay for a buy-now price of $165. You can probably find one even cheaper. 

 

And as already mentioned, the 2xx series is the same size as the 4xx series, just not as nice looking. But if you're just getting a nice all black pen, or a clear demonstrator, if your tastes go that way, then it doesn't really matter if it's a 4xx or 2xx. (ok, the nibs are a bit fancier on the 4xx, but I've heard the 250 nib is often a nicer writer)

 

Just another option. 



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#18 Dottie

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 13:17

LOL when I saw the title, Pelikano and Pelikan Future are the first things that entered my mind, but that's obviously not what you are looking for....  Still- it IS a great, reliable, fantastic entry level pen....  And- technically speaking, it is a good value and ideal for a student...  :lol:

 

That's what I was thinking too! Actually I really like the Pelikano. It is a nice little workhorse.



#19 Zuzu

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 14:51

Pelinakos are really nice. I was a little upset when I discovered their design had changed a lot from the time I went to school. I much preferred the slim blue plastic barrels with the metal caps. On the other hand I can see how the new, more colorful line up might appeal to the age group they are intended for.



#20 cleosmama

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 15:07

I have the M200 Demonstrator, and I like it a lot. The nib is a little springy, and the more I use it, the wetter it seems to get. I am getting some nice shading with Diamine WES Kensington Blue. At first, I thought maybe the color was growing on me, but now I think it's a combination of the color and the line the pen is laying down now that I've used it on and off for the last 6 weeks. 

 

It is a small pen, quite light, but for me, it's really one of the most comfortable pens I have to write with. The only other pen I find as comfortable is my Sailor Pro Gear Slim. 







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