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The Ink Blame Game

ink pen repair

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44 replies to this topic

#41 PrintersDevil

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 22:29

Well, to add to the discussion, I have a Pelikan 600 pen, which  I started to use with Noodler's ink and other brands. The problem with the pen is that the pen is too wet if you use non Pelikan brands of ink. It is wet as a sea, and even a fine nib line dries out like a broad one. After one or two ink changes, I finally purchased two bottles of Pelikan 400 ink and the pen started to write very well with the ink. Seeing that the problem was the same for a Parker Duofold Centennial, I tested the Pelikan ink with the Parker, and the pen ceased to be wet. For any other pen I use the Noodler's black because it has proved to be the one that I can easily use because I am a left handed writer. Noodler's ink has the advantage of being very strong in the paper, and in some hours it becomes indestructible, water cannot smudge it. I also use my pens to draw. Noodler's is very good for that. Another brand I like is Shaeffer ink, it is very dark and it also dries very strong. I think that no pen can be indestructible, and any ink that comes for a fountain pen can be good, and this is a matter of much debate among fountain pen users. At times I also purchase many other brands of ink, to test them. Whatever we are saying here adds to the liberty of making a decision to purchase the ink we want. I don't think that it is an absolute thing that a pen should use that particular brand of ink. Period.

 

I have a Pelikan 600 with a broad nib and used Noodler's ink without any problem.  Diamine ink too.

Maybe you need a new nib?

Pelikan nibs simply unscrew and you can buy new nibs online.



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#42 PeterPenPencil

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 11:09

 

I have a Pelikan 600 with a broad nib and used Noodler's ink without any problem.  Diamine ink too.

Maybe you need a new nib?

Pelikan nibs simply unscrew and you can buy new nibs online.

My friend wrote:

I have a Pelikan 600 with a broad nib and used Noodler's ink without any problem.  Diamine ink too.

Maybe you need a new nib?

Pelikan nibs simply unscrew and you can buy new nibs online.

 

Well, I purchased a new nib from  John Motishaw at nibs.com  and the pen is one of my favorites. Thanks for the advice, it will be followed.



#43 pajaro

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 11:33

My friend wrote:

I have a Pelikan 600 with a broad nib and used Noodler's ink without any problem.  Diamine ink too.

Maybe you need a new nib?

Pelikan nibs simply unscrew and you can buy new nibs online.

 

Well, I purchased a new nib from  John Motishaw at nibs.com  and the pen is one of my favorites. Thanks for the advice, it will be followed.

 

I have three Watermans of the same type with five nibs among them.  Three nibs are as from the factory, fine, medium and broad.  Two of the nibs came from nibs.com, fine and extra fine.  They cost more, but those fine and extra fine nibs from nibs.com have better flow by a small margin and they seem smoother.  I think it;s worth it in the long run to pay more to get something that will be more pleasant to use.  Inks don't seem to have a great influence on any of the five.

 

If you are in the business of selling or repairing pens, it is probably easier to react to issues with a pen with a disclaimer about use of inks outside of a narrow range.  Who could prove the contrary case, that an ink is not at fault?  I think it's impossible to prove an ink is not a culprit, and I think blaming the ink without offering proof that an intellectually honest person would accept is a cop-out.


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#44 PeterPenPencil

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 13:29

There's one thing here: How is the manufacturer to know if I use other inks and then if the pen is damaged (obviously nor for the ink to blame) I refill the pen with the original manfacturer's brand and send it back to him? People, be smart, I am not telling you to cheat, but you know when a seller is protecting himself against all kinds of repairs, and he is probably protecting himself so that his business has cheaper spending funds in their pen business? I worked once as an electronics technician, and you know how much it hurts when you have to spend hours in a repair that came back and has to do warranty repairs. Say, one preferred to do things right so that in the long run you don't have to overwork.

In the logic of not using another brand of ink other than that the manufacturer's specifies, it would be then to cheat the manufacturer when you use brands of ink that you like and you know that these people of the ink you like does not manufacture pens.



#45 prf5

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 20:07

The business policies of Chartpak are designed to make you buy from an authorized dealer and to buy new.  Presumably they don't want any used pens taking away from their dealers' sales.  Makes sense if you are in business to sell new Pelikans.

 

I think you have it right. I suspect that Chartpak has a contract with Pelikan and gets paid by the unit. if so, it to their advantage to focus on quick and simple repairs. Based on the content of this thread, my advice to an owner of a new Pelikian is to use factory-authorized ink for the first 30 days, which covers the free warranty period. That's especially true given inconsistencies in the manufacture of nibs and the likelihood that Chartpak will get involved soon after purchase. After 30 days you will probably be paying for repairs for the first year or so. Then if you have a repair, you might be better off working with an independent source. Given the company's price increases the tight interpretation of rules of repair, I wonder what is the expected life of a new Pelikan? Is the company trying to stay profitable by asking buyers to purchase a new pen, say every five years?







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