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Toledo That Sold On Ebay.

toledo

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24 replies to this topic

#21 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 20:52

In gold that is very pretty. :thumbup: :notworthy1:

Even if you take a 0 off it's out of my range.

 

My second most expensive pen is a 500 rolled gold cap and piston capp for €156. A pen I'd never looked for, in it was hugly over my budget. A real wet OBB even if it's not marked. a 30 degree grind.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


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#22 Rick Propas

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 23:44

Apologies for the delay in posting images and replies. And thanks for sharing my excitement. I *will* get better images up soon. As far a removing the binde, it was already loose and I did have to replace the barrel. So no problems.

#23 christof

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 15:24

...I did have to replace the barrel...


Rick

Interesting that you mention that, because I have a theorie about Pelikan 100 with metal sleeves. Of course I do not have large experience with this pens, that’s why I am interested to hear what you are thinking about it. So, my theorie goes like this:
Early Pelikan 100 barrels are made of cellulose acetate. This material is chemically unstable and tends to release solvents and acid vapors. Usually not a problem when the material of the binde is the same or vapor permeable at least, and when the pen is storaged at a well ventilated place of course. But I think it can become a problem when the binde is made of a vapor-tight material like metal.
I have this pen which seemed nearly unused when it came to me.

10904278084_5437102ee6_b.jpg
10904187886_f65760fea8_b.jpg

No HR discoloration, no brassing and crisp imprints. But the barrel was completely destroyed. It just broke in thousend parts when I tried to screw out the piston. Amazingly enough, the Pd nib too…
I replaced the barrel but I am unsure about storage of this pen and what is to do that the same does not happen again in a couple of years, decades...?
Now, what do you think about this?

Christof

. . . my current S A L E S . . .

 

 

 

fpn_1501079397__18762338330_19cf666a48_o


#24 Rick Propas

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 00:00

Christof, Interesting theory, but I am not at all sure that it is valid. I've seen these shafts become brittle under celluloid as well as metal bindes and the shaft on the short captop went midway up the ink window. I think the embrittlement and breakage is pretty random and related most closely to the nature of the material and other factors that we just don't know. But that's just a guess, since we don't know.

One other note, the vulnerable shafts are those made of cellulose nitrate (1930-37), the cellulose acetate (1938-44?) have other issues (mostly clouding and cracking).

Rick
Interesting that you mention that, because I have a theorie about Pelikan 100 with metal sleeves. Of course I do not have large experience with this pens, thats why I am interested to hear what you are thinking about it. So, my theorie goes like this:
Early Pelikan 100 barrels are made of cellulose acetate. This material is chemically unstable and tends to release solvents and acid vapors. Usually not a problem when the material of the binde is the same or vapor permeable at least, and when the pen is storaged at a well ventilated place of course. But I think it can become a problem when the binde is made of a vapor-tight material like metal.
I have this pen which seemed nearly unused when it came to me.10904278084_5437102ee6_b.jpg10904187886_f65760fea8_b.jpg
No HR discoloration, no brassing and crisp imprints. But the barrel was completely destroyed. It just broke in thousend parts when I tried to screw out the piston. Amazingly enough, the Pd nib too
I replaced the barrel but I am unsure about storage of this pen and what is to do that the same does not happen again in a couple of years, decades...?
Now, what do you think about this?
Christof


Edited by Rick Propas, 14 March 2014 - 00:03.


#25 christof

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 04:55

One other note, the vulnerable shafts are those made of cellulose nitrate (1930-37), the cellulose acetate (1938-44?) have other issues (mostly clouding and cracking).


Oh, thank you for making this clear. I mixed up the designation.

Thanks also for sharing your experience. As I said, I don't have seen that much of these pens to prove my theorie. That's why I asked you.

Christof

. . . my current S A L E S . . .

 

 

 

fpn_1501079397__18762338330_19cf666a48_o






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