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Recommend A Fp For Heavy Useage

heavy usage university affordable

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90 replies to this topic

#61 Abner C. Kemp

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:24

Pilot Custom 74 w/ Con 70: Will hold plenty of ink. Pretty nice classic design. Japanese nib that will run quite fine. Demonstrator pen so you can see how much ink you have left. Fairly durable resin design. Gold nib for smooth writing. 

 

TWSBI 580: Piston filler that holds a lot of ink. Demonstrator pen so you can see how much ink you have left. Pretty classic looking pen.. can be purchased with rose gold accents which looks very classy imo. Known for having fairly smooth steel nibs. Nibs are easily interchangeable. Known to crack if mishandled but the 580 has more metal parts that greatly strengthen the pens design. 

 

If you are willing to spend a bit more money on your pen ~$150 I would highly suggest you take a look at the Lamy 2000. It is a piston filler and holds plenty of ink. Has a display window so you can check your ink level. 14K gold hooded nib for smooth writing. Futuristic/classic design… so I know that doesn't make any sense but the pen is known as an icon and comes in a nice black finish with a stainless grip section… very nice looking pen imo. More importantly it is a pretty damn strong pen being made out of fiberglass and stainless steel and will be able to keep up with very heavy usage. 

 

I think the Ahab pen should be listed here as well for a few reasons. First of all, the pen can be converted to an eyedropper which will hold A LOT of ink. Second, the pens are cheap (~$20) so if something happens to one pen you can always purchase another without feeling too bad. Third, you can simply purchase a Goulet Fine nib for the pen ($15) and it will write a nice fine line for you. So for ~$35 you have a nice big pen that holds a load of ink and is replaceable if something happens to it. I find the Ahabs extremely pleasant to hold and there are plenty of classic color options to choose from. 


Edited by Abner C. Kemp, 05 January 2014 - 02:30.


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#62 mori45

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 08:03

I'd try a Pelikan M200/205. They also hold a fair amount of ink and are very comfortable to write with for extended periods. They have steel nibs that write quite well but are easily replaceable/changeable if you want variation or if your pen takes a nosedive.



#63 oronet commander

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:03

Another pen you may consider is the Faber Castell Loom. They are pretty cheap, write like a charm, and are built like tanks without being heavy. They use international cartridges or converters (the Faber Castell is particularly good). My 13-year old son uses one and loves it.


Edited by oronet commander, 05 January 2014 - 11:39.


#64 sonorma

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:23

@sonorma

Is there a way for you to measure or compare the ink line from the Rotring EF?

Example, how does it compare to a Lamy XF or F nib.

I am always stuck when it comes to selecting a nib size, because of the size variation between brands.

 

thanks

 

fNX0TR1.gif

 

As you can see here the line of the Lamy XF is definitely wieder than that of the Rotring. I have also added a line from a modern Kaweco Dia c/c filler, a Parker Classic flighter and a Pelikan shorthand fountain pen. The shorthand fountain pen makes the finest line but I don`t recommend it for I have four of these and all are scratchy except one. The Parker is nice for making notes but not suitable for long writing because it is way too slim. 

I also cannot recommend Lamy XF nibs for the quality is all over the place and you don`t get the same line width from two nibs. I had XF nibs that wrote wide like F nibs and vice versa. And some were scratchy, too. 


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#65 ac12

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 20:06

@sonorma

Thank you

That is exactly what I needed to determine that the Rotring EF is what I want.

The Parker Classic with a F nib is one of my favorite pens.  I have small hands and the slimline pen fits me fine.


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#66 markinlondon

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 09:17

I've been using fountain pens for the last several years in University, first as an undergrad, then as a master's student, then as a PhD student, and now as a lecturer, and have used a few different pens full-time without problems.  While it's true that using bottled ink can be very inconvenient, I've used cartridges from Parker and Private reserve and have had no problem swapping cartridges during lectures. 

 

For years, my main pan was a Parker Duofold, but cracks developed and it's been retired until my budget allows for a full restoration. I've also used a Waterman Philieas and a Carene; a custom generically-nibbed pen from a craft show, and a Lamy Safari. I recently picked up a Parker 51 (three of them actually), and am waiting for a bottle of Private Reserve. The 51 will become my daily user, assuming that it doesn't explode :)

 

I also carry a soft Moleskin in my pocket, and it's typically mated to a Phileas. That combo follows me to pool halls, concerts and work without any problems at all. 

 

My sense is that any pen will work for you, and that writing comfort, ink cartridge selection, and the approving glances and comments from attractive coeds should drive your decision.

 

P.S. have you considered a Namiki Vanishing Point? That's supposed to be a serious workhorse. There are also some nice custom nibs available from them. Check richardspens.com.


Edited by markinlondon, 07 January 2014 - 09:23.


#67 chandelle

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 10:38

  • durable & reliable: heavy usage as mentioned above
  • comfortable: good ink flow and smooth flow of the nib on the paper.
  • good sized ink cartridge: while I can refill if I am at my desk, but this is not always the case.
  • affordable: as a student I do not have a large budget; perhaps sub $100 (but can be stretched if absolutely needed).
  • classy (not entirely necessary): I do not like very colourful or oddly-shaped designs very much; I like something that does not draw attention to itself. I like black, shades of grey, and white/silver/metallic colours. From the pens I have seen, Waterman Carene FPs, in my opinion, are the most beautiful of them all.
  • misc: I write on rather cheap writing pads so fine or extra fine tips may be most suitable.

 

Find me better workhorse value for money than either the $17 Kaigelu 333 or $20 Nemosine Singularity and I'll consider changing my cognomen :)

 

I have both and can vouch for their redoubtable reliability. They also tick each of your boxes.


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#68 impossiblebird

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 13:26

 

Do you have a JinHao?  If so, how long have you had it and how do you like it?  Maybe it's me, but I can't get past the feeling that it's just a cheap pen that doesn't write that well - and I've never seen one other than on-line.  At the same time, I sing the praises of the Pilot Metropolitan and it's only $15.00 US.   :lol:  Maybe it's brand recognition.

 

I own and use the Jinhao 450s, and have never had any trouble with them. The caps snap on and off, which some people find more useful while taking notes, the section has a nod towards a grip, which I find very comfortable, and the nibs are quite wet, large and strong; I've loaned 450s to people who, thanks to a lifetime of biro use, leaned a tad heavily on the nibs from sheer habit, with no harm coming to them. They take a large standard converter, and they're cheap enough to carry a spare. It's brass pen, very robust.

 

I love a Parker 45; it was my first FP, and I've used it on and off for over 40 years, but it has a slim, tapering section, and the nib has a smallish sweet spot ...

 

The Sheaffer Imperials have a tapering shape which for me goes hand-in-glove with the design of the beautiful Parker 45 and Waterman Carene (which I'm also a big fan of), but the section is bulkier than the 45's and is to my mind more comfortable for long stretches. The stainless steel models are extremely robust, and last time I looked, they were for sale at very reasonable prices at Peyton Street Pens (no affiliation). Though I don't know how the nibs would hold up, if you are heavy on them ... the Carene nib, on the other hand, would, I imagine, tolerate being leaned on quite heavily, and I've never met a stingy one. It even has a nice stub nib available for (last I looked) the same price as other sizes.



#69 impossiblebird

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 13:30

 

I own and use the Jinhao 450s, and have never had any trouble with them. The caps snap on and off, which some people find more useful while taking notes, the section has a nod towards a grip, which I find very comfortable, and the nibs are quite wet, large and strong; I've loaned 450s to people who, thanks to a lifetime of biro use, leaned a tad heavily on the nibs from sheer habit, with no harm coming to them. They take a large standard converter, and they're cheap enough to carry a spare. It's brass pen, very robust.

 

I love a Parker 45; it was my first FP, and I've used it on and off for over 40 years, but it has a slim, tapering section, and the nib has a smallish sweet spot ...

 

The Sheaffer Imperials have a tapering shape which for me goes hand-in-glove with the design of the beautiful Parker 45 and Waterman Carene (which I'm also a big fan of), but the section is bulkier than the 45's and is to my mind more comfortable for long stretches. The stainless steel models are extremely robust, and last time I looked, they were for sale at very reasonable prices at Peyton Street Pens (no affiliation). Though I don't know how the nibs would hold up, if you are heavy on them ... the Carene nib, on the other hand, would, I imagine, tolerate being leaned on quite heavily, and I've never met a stingy one. It even has a nice stub nib available for (last I looked) the same price as other sizes.

 

Ooops! the bulk of this should have been addressed to the OP ...



#70 holgalee

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 15:13

I hope the OP is not tired of receiving recommendations already, as we fountain pen users are always so passionate about pens! Anyway, here's my 2 cents.

 

Like you, I tend to press down hard on my pens when I need to write a lot or fast. It goes against logic but it happens! As a student, I enjoyed using the Pilot V5 rollerball pen which is smooth and has a needlepoint tip which gives a somewhat close experience to using fountain pens. Alternatives are the Pilot Hi-Tec C in 0.4 or 0.5mm and other Japanese ink or gel rollerballs with needlepoint tips. You may want to check out Jetpens, Jstationery or Tokyo Pen Shop, etc for such pens, which will be good pens to use when you do not feel inclined to use your fountain pens. 

 

As a postgraduate student, I used a variety of cheap fountain pens as I was just starting out and did not know any better. I've used the Sheaffer No-nonsense (old model without rubber grip which I absolutely detest) with F nib that I converted it into an eyedropper pen with the help of some silicone grease. Other pens I used include the Pilot 78G, Pilot Prera, the Pilot Tank (also called the non-self filling fountain pen) and the Sailor Manhattener's. I have--generally speaking--better experience with Japanese pens as the nibs are finer yet smooth (with perhaps a touch of tooth) and my handwriting looks better with finer nibs. 

 

If you like really fine (0.5mm and below) line widths, I would recommend a modern/late vintage Japanese fountain pen with F nib. Apart from the Pilot Custom Heritage 74, you may want to consider the 91 or 92. The 92 is my new favourite as it's a piston filler that's easier to clean and holds a tonne of ink. You can search ebay for Asian/Japanese pen sellers who are offering attractive prices. I own a number of non-Japanese modern fountain pens as well, but for the price range of <$100, the Japanese ones feel and perform better, at least for me. As with many things "personal" (to me, writing instruments are very important) and close to our hearts, everyone else's mileage may vary and all opinions valid. :)

 

Hope I make sense. It's close to bedtime at my side of the pond and I suspect I'm rambling and not entirely lucid!


Edited by holgalee, 07 January 2014 - 15:16.


#71 kpyeoman

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 18:30

I completely concur with those who have recommended the Custom 74 (non-demo versions) with a Con 70 converter.  I really can't see how it doesn't meet your criteria precisely, or where it would let you down.  You're getting a very classy pen, great ergonomics, excellent ink capacity (far greater than some of the other cc pens suggested), good weight for extended writing, a gold nib instead of a steel nib, and probably the best fine nib out there for the type of work you're looking to do within your stated budget amount. 

 

The added benefit is that it's a true workhorse pen -- attractive enough to cause you to feel proud in using it (it's a "grown-up" feeling pen), but cheap enough that if you lost it through the day-to-day life of a student that you wouldn't have a melt-down.

 

IMHO, all of the other suggestions presented have negatives going against them; I'm at a complete loss to think of any for the Custom 74 for your criteria/parameters.

 

Worth selecting and purchasing -- you won't regret it.



#72 UDog

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 03:30

Buy 10 Platinum Preppies (03) put cartridges in each and you're set and only about $30. (Smooth writers too).


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#73 Lyander0012

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:08

If you're looking for something newer, I'd easily recommend a TWSBI Vac 700 with a F nib. Insanely large ink capacity and a great nib to be had at well under your budget (more money for ink!). Should you be willing to go vintage though, then nothing's better from a workhorse perspective than a Parker 51 (aero filler). I personally love the Lamy 2000, but buying it new is a bit above your budget.


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#74 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 13:58

One of the many medium-large beautiful Pelikan 600's. It is still light and nimble, with nice girth. Holds 1.37 ml ink. I'd suggest an F or an EF.....you can order one nib, and if it is too narrow or wide exchange it free with in 5 weeks.

It will be butter smooth.

A great pen for a noobie.

 

The standard sized 200 has a narrower steel nib that is not so blobby tipped, and is a bit springier. For @ $25 one can buy other nibs, ie a Broad or Medium one to go with a F or EF.

 

 

Best of all worlds....some day order a semi-flex nib from the '50's from a 400, 400N or when one has the light Hand a 400NN's nib for the 600.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#75 fpconverted

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 16:54

I am trying to decide on an appropriate FP and need advice. I had a look at previous threads asking something similar to what I have asked below, but they were from 2006. I will continue looking at relevant threads.
 
What will I use it for?
I am a university student (post-grad) who writes a lot (around 50 pages or more of equations per day).
 
What do I use currently or used previously?
The university provides ballpoint and also fineliner pens. The ballpoint pens make my fingers ache after a few pages. As I put a bit of pressure, often in the heat of the moment, the tip of fineliners get pushed back inside and they no longer work. The alternatives I have are: gel pens and FPs; I have chosen FP due to lower operational costs.
 
I had a Parker FP (one of the Sonnets) which broke unfortunately (I fell asleep on it while writing in bed). I did not like this FP very much either as the ink cartridge was rather small, the pen dried up quickly during the pauses in writing, and ink flow was not smooth.
 
What do I want in the new FP?

  • durable & reliable: heavy usage as mentioned above
  • comfortable: good ink flow and smooth flow of the nib on the paper.
  • good sized ink cartridge: while I can refill if I am at my desk, but this is not always the case.
  • affordable: as a student I do not have a large budget; perhaps sub $100 (but can be stretched if absolutely needed).
  • classy (not entirely necessary): I do not like very colourful or oddly-shaped designs very much; I like something that does not draw attention to itself. I like black, shades of grey, and white/silver/metallic colours. From the pens I have seen, Waterman Carene FPs, in my opinion, are the most beautiful of them all.
  • misc: I write on rather cheap writing pads so fine or extra fine tips may be most suitable.
Thank you in advance for taking the time to help! :)
P.S: Please feel free to request more info if I have failed to mention something.
P.P.S: I apologise for my failure to spell the topic properly.


You've just described the TWSBI 580.

www.twsbi.com

The ink tank is hue and you can get one for under 60$

#76 zap210

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 22:48

If you can find a sub $100 Parker 51 with the nib you want (look at the pics closely) get it. I also used a Pelikan 200 with a steel nib for many years with no problems. Both pens are maintenance free and work when you need them to. There is an ink window on the Pelikan so its easy to determine when to refill. The 51 will start writing dryer when the ink is close to running out. When this happens just give it a few squeezes in the ink bottle and you are good to go. In a short time you will get used to refilling on a regular basis, say every Saturday or something. With finer nibs you get longer write times. Just never drop a fountain pen. Keep it either in your hand or pocket at all times. And never gesture with an open FP!



#77 legume

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 20:47

I would advise you not to get the Pilot Falcon if you have trouble with pushing in felt tipped pens. As you know, the Falcon has a soft nib that may be sprung with too much pressure. Better to get a stiff nib that can handle pressure until you've accustomed yourself to writing with light pressure.

#78 xTwiinKy

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 21:52

!!! As a High School student please hear me out! 

I've tried a few different kinds , Pelikan M400, TWSBI 580, Safari, Studio, Vintage Sheaffers and Eversharp, Sailor 1911M , Lamy 2000

 

You dont get a sense of the functionality of a pen unless you feel it and use it. What do I mean by that?

How the pen caps, clips, fills, displays ink level are some of the most noticeable. When you contemplate buying a pen online you may not like it in person. Also, just because people here are comfortable using their Montblanc 149 or Pelikan M800 at their office desks doesn't mean it's ideally suitable for high school/college shuffling and moving around. 

 

Although I do not own a Parker 51/45, of all the pens listed above, (which the Sailor can be comparable to a Custom 74 in function/feel), the LAMY 2000 is the best pen.

Nevermind the fact that its a gold nib, not a nail and nice soft(not flexible) smooooooth feel, or that its a piston filler with a huge ink capacity, FORGET THAT! 

 

I do not like keeping my pens on my desk (I've lost pens in school that way) or in my pocket (I have to straighten my pocket to pull the pen out... also risking crushing/bending) , or in my bag (I have to get my bag to retrieve it all the time? and have a greater chance of misplacing it!) 

The LAMY 2000 clip by design its nothing like all my other pens. It clips and holds effortlessly and I store it on my inner long sleeve tshirt thermal collar (where your adams apple is). When I want to use my pen I simply pull my pen from my tshirt collar. Its as fast as grabbing a pen off the side of your desk... equivilant of pulling a pen out of a shirt pocket .. 

I should make a video of how quickly I can pull it out ... its half a second ! 

 

I've ran, downhill racing, etc. jumped with this pen hanging from my tshirt and has never come off. It is a slip cap securely held by size fit as well as two 'hooks'. It will never come off by throwing, pulling from one end etc. I wouldn't put a 160$ pen in the chance to fall off and break/ get lost. I cannot say the same for screw caps. My Pel and Sheaffer Touchdown, and Eversharp often unscrewed slightly ! I hate trusting screw caps not to unscrew in pockets/ handling.. .it makes me nervous. I wouldnt trust them dangling from my shirt ... with no bottom. If the pen unscrewed... the pen would fall out through my shirt to the ground. Also , screw caps are screwed by hand torque. My LAMY makes a click to signal its locked securely. No need to double check the tightness or second guess yourself.

 

 

 

I can clarify what I mean by how I store the pen if you want me to. The point is ... insanely quick withdrawl... you can instantly check if you have your pen with you by touching your chest and feeling the pen, and you wont have to worry about unscrewing or checking to see if its tightened sufficiently.

 

----- 

The pen in every other aspect is great. Very durable fingerprint/scratch resistant, smudgeproof material ... unlike others that get all oily and dusty (Pelikan, Sailor, Skyline etc) 

Piston filler... 1.5ml or so ink compared to 1.1 for the Con 70 for the Custom 74.. Quick fill .. and asthetic ink window!

Slip cap ... quicker opening than long threaded pens... BUT ... does not beat shorter threaded pens like the Sheaffer Touchdown, Pelikan M400 in the slightest. However these pens are super easy to open in your pocket in my experience! Forget carrying it in your shirt... much less security.

Great balance.. stainless steel front section .. not back heavy. 

Ink window ...I dont know why there is so much hate for it. It is very functional even in bad/indirect light... you don't even need light. Level it sideways to see the exact ink level. If you want to check it by holding it up or down.... Hold it up and its clear your at less than 70% If its clear holding it down.. your less than 40%. 

 

 

 

 

Again this is my experience with those pens listed above and my personal experience requirements. I don't have a personal desk with a personal pen stand to put my Pelikan (thats why I keep it home) . But I'm also not working out in the field jotting down notes on my knee notebook stand where a one handed- click ballpoint might be preferred.

I'd love feedback on my opinion and system ... I'd love to learn and improve. 


Edited by xTwiinKy, 10 January 2014 - 21:57.


#79 chandelle

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 01:52

Again this is my experience with those pens listed above and my personal experience requirements. I don't have a personal desk with a personal pen stand to put my Pelikan (thats why I keep it home) . But I'm also not working out in the field jotting down notes on my knee notebook stand where a one handed- click ballpoint might be preferred.

I'd love feedback on my opinion and system ... I'd love to learn and improve. 

 

The Lamy 2k is a corker and would easily be in my top 3 all-time favorites. Easily. I could wax on endlessly about its beauty, reliability and the rest of it but at $300 it sadly doesn't tick the 'price' box for a student. How I wish it sold for $100!


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#80 Buzz_130

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 02:13

!!! As a High School student please hear me out! 

I've tried a few different kinds , Pelikan M400, TWSBI 580, Safari, Studio, Vintage Sheaffers and Eversharp, Sailor 1911M , Lamy 2000

 

You dont get a sense of the functionality of a pen unless you feel it and use it. What do I mean by that?

How the pen caps, clips, fills, displays ink level are some of the most noticeable. When you contemplate buying a pen online you may not like it in person. Also, just because people here are comfortable using their Montblanc 149 or Pelikan M800 at their office desks doesn't mean it's ideally suitable for high school/college shuffling and moving around. 

 

Although I do not own a Parker 51/45, of all the pens listed above, (which the Sailor can be comparable to a Custom 74 in function/feel), the LAMY 2000 is the best pen.

Nevermind the fact that its a gold nib, not a nail and nice soft(not flexible) smooooooth feel, or that its a piston filler with a huge ink capacity, FORGET THAT! 

 

I do not like keeping my pens on my desk (I've lost pens in school that way) or in my pocket (I have to straighten my pocket to pull the pen out... also risking crushing/bending) , or in my bag (I have to get my bag to retrieve it all the time? and have a greater chance of misplacing it!) 

The LAMY 2000 clip by design its nothing like all my other pens. It clips and holds effortlessly and I store it on my inner long sleeve tshirt thermal collar (where your adams apple is). When I want to use my pen I simply pull my pen from my tshirt collar. Its as fast as grabbing a pen off the side of your desk... equivilant of pulling a pen out of a shirt pocket .. 

I should make a video of how quickly I can pull it out ... its half a second ! 

 

I've ran, downhill racing, etc. jumped with this pen hanging from my tshirt and has never come off. It is a slip cap securely held by size fit as well as two 'hooks'. It will never come off by throwing, pulling from one end etc. I wouldn't put a 160$ pen in the chance to fall off and break/ get lost. I cannot say the same for screw caps. My Pel and Sheaffer Touchdown, and Eversharp often unscrewed slightly ! I hate trusting screw caps not to unscrew in pockets/ handling.. .it makes me nervous. I wouldnt trust them dangling from my shirt ... with no bottom. If the pen unscrewed... the pen would fall out through my shirt to the ground. Also , screw caps are screwed by hand torque. My LAMY makes a click to signal its locked securely. No need to double check the tightness or second guess yourself.

 

 

 

I can clarify what I mean by how I store the pen if you want me to. The point is ... insanely quick withdrawl... you can instantly check if you have your pen with you by touching your chest and feeling the pen, and you wont have to worry about unscrewing or checking to see if its tightened sufficiently.

 

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The pen in every other aspect is great. Very durable fingerprint/scratch resistant, smudgeproof material ... unlike others that get all oily and dusty (Pelikan, Sailor, Skyline etc) 

Piston filler... 1.5ml or so ink compared to 1.1 for the Con 70 for the Custom 74.. Quick fill .. and asthetic ink window!

Slip cap ... quicker opening than long threaded pens... BUT ... does not beat shorter threaded pens like the Sheaffer Touchdown, Pelikan M400 in the slightest. However these pens are super easy to open in your pocket in my experience! Forget carrying it in your shirt... much less security.

Great balance.. stainless steel front section .. not back heavy. 

Ink window ...I dont know why there is so much hate for it. It is very functional even in bad/indirect light... you don't even need light. Level it sideways to see the exact ink level. If you want to check it by holding it up or down.... Hold it up and its clear your at less than 70% If its clear holding it down.. your less than 40%. 

 

 

 

 

Again this is my experience with those pens listed above and my personal experience requirements. I don't have a personal desk with a personal pen stand to put my Pelikan (thats why I keep it home) . But I'm also not working out in the field jotting down notes on my knee notebook stand where a one handed- click ballpoint might be preferred.

I'd love feedback on my opinion and system ... I'd love to learn and improve. 

The Lamy 2000 is an incredible pen and an enduring design from 1966.  This is the only pen in my collection that I've actually dropped.  From standing height onto asphalt, this pen took a small ding to cap and writes perfectly today.  It's a workhorse with all of the characteristics you describe as well as an excellent performing nib.  However, even the Amazon price tag puts it a bit out of his reach, that's why I seconded ac12's recommendation for Parker 45s (about $25-$35 restored).  I like your choice, and your recommendation/usage presents a very strong argument!

 

Buzz







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: heavy usage, university, affordable



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