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A Note On The Ahab

ahab good inexpensive fountain pen

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29 replies to this topic

#21 lynxcat

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 15:32

inconsistent quality control does seem to be the major failing of the Noodler's pens, yes. i'm pretty sure i'll roll the dice with them at least once more myself, though --- i want to see what exactly the differences are between the Ahab and the Konrad, and which would fit my hand better. besides, as pens go, these die rolls are fairly cheap --- not like i can't afford to risk it.



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#22 iRabb

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 16:42

Where are you getting them for $14?

 

I am so frustrated, but I cannot replicate the steps that got me to a page of $14 dollar Ahabs. I wonder if a change has been made since I bought mine. 

 

However, if you like the color or don't care about the color, there is one $14 Ahab here: http://penboutique.e...ds-ahab--page-2

 

Sorry…



#23 iRabb

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 16:44

inconsistent quality control does seem to be the major failing of the Noodler's pens, yes. i'm pretty sure i'll roll the dice with them at least once more myself, though --- i want to see what exactly the differences are between the Ahab and the Konrad, and which would fit my hand better. besides, as pens go, these die rolls are fairly cheap --- not like i can't afford to risk it.

 

I feel the very same way. It costs much more than that to feed my kids pizza for dinner.



#24 bluebunny

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 17:35

The Ahab was the second fountain pen I purchased and I find it really depends on the ink I'm using as to how much I like it. From the comments I'm reading here it sounds like I need to tweak it for different inks. I got lucky with the first ink I tried in it, so my initial reaction was quite positive to the Ahab.The last couple inks I tried, I end up with ink on my hands when writing despite cleaning the exterior of the pen each time. For this reason I'm only using it at home for now. One of the things I do like about it is it's size. I have RA & like the fatter Ahab in my hand better than a very slender pen.



#25 iRabb

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 18:33

FWIW, I use what I always use for black (and I almost always use black), and that's Noodler's Heart of Darkness. It comes with a free pen that I now know is an eye-dropper Platinum Preppy. It is a stunningly good fine point nail, even if wasn't free.

#26 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 20:11

Pterodactylus's method of using a dremel to make Angel Wings is very good. My Ahab is no longer hard to use in the nib is modified so it is Easy Full Flex.

 

That is the first stage of true flexible nibs.

Regular flex if hard mashed will give 3 X tine spread of a light down stroke. Semi-flex needs half that pressure and 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex half of that or 1/4th the pressure needed to spread a regular flex nib. These three are in a flex set that only does 3X.

 

Nibs that really allow 4-5-6 or even 7 X and are easy to to use are (Ahab is not.).

Easy Full Flex- 1/8th, Wet Noodle/Super-flex 1/16th. Weak Kneed Wet Noodles, less.

 

So the jump from an Ahab with it's normal semi-flex nib to Easy Full Flex is wonderful.

I now use my Ahab....before I didn't.

 

I did have a problem of it blobbing after the modification. Taking the breather tube out cured that.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#27 iRabb

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 21:12

There is a major problem with Pterodactylus's method. It says you need "a little craftsmanship." I should not even own a Dremel. I do, but I've only used it for polishing. I'm considering trying it, but I am very nervous. I know, it's only an Ahab. fortunately, at the moment the tool is in one place and the battery and charger are in two different, both unknown places. I'll let you know if I take the plunge. But just the diagram alone shows that Pterodactylus has more than a little craftsmanship!



#28 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 23:18

Over in one of the two fountain pen review sections, is a large thread on how to do it.

If not, Pendleton Brown....can do that.

Could be he has Ahab nibs made into 'Angel Wings' already ready to fly.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#29 iRabb

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 23:34

Over in one of the two fountain pen review sections, is a large thread on how to do it.

If not, Pendleton Brown....can do that.

Could be he has Ahab nibs made into 'Angel Wings' already ready to fly.

 

I'm going to email him now and ask. Thanks.



#30 Drone

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:40

Don't get me wrong, my first post in this thread just outlined the history with my Noodler's flex pens to-date. Even though build quality has been a problem - I still love the pens - once I get them to work of course.

As for the Ease My Flex Mod, it is easier than you think to accomplish. Read on...

I used an inexpensive rotary tool (I think it cost around $15 USD) and a "bullet bit" grinding stone; somewhat like this one:

Abrasive_Point_02 (Small).jpg

The grinding stone pictured above is rather small, the stone itself is 1/4 inch in diameter by 3/16 inch wide at the base. A stone that's a little bigger may be better. A single stone tool costs around a dollar; they often come in packs of three or five. This is the stone shape I chose to use, it may or may not be the optimal shape for the job. There are lots of other stone shapes available like cones, cylinders, spheres, etc.

The stone shown above is pink. Pink is supposed to designate an Aluminum Oxide (AO) stone. A gray stone is Silicon Carbide (SiC). If I'm not mistaken, the AO stone is probably best to work with as it is capable of dealing with the nib material and will grind cooler than a SiC stone. But both types should work.

My stone is quite smooth. If you have a course stone, you may want to replace it with something smoother. Smoother is better as your grinding will be more accurate.

I followed the instructions on the Pterodactylus thread and marked the sections to be cut away carefully with a Sharpie-like "indelible" pen making sure the marked areas were symmetrical. Don't worry if you mess up the marking, the Sharpie ink will rub off with a little elbow grease applied and you can start anew.

Next I donned eye protection, set the rotary tool to about half-speed, and while holding the nib in one hand slowly ground the marked areas away with the tool in the other hand. I ground small amounts in each pass checking my work between passes. This keeps you in-check and prevents the nib from getting too hot to hold.

The marking took longer than the grinding. All told it was a quick and easy job. Less than a half hour if memory serves.


Edited by Drone, 23 December 2013 - 10:44.






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