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Pelikan - Best For Signature?

pelikan signature signatures

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73 replies to this topic

#41 Cake

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 01:56

Everyone has shared such great wisdom here. 

As someone who has no choice but to use cheapo paper at work, I always keep that in mind when considering which fountain pen I want to use for a signature.  It has to be a fine or medium nib with an ink that doesn't feather or bleed.  I have 2 Pelikans (M215 with a steel nib and a M400 White Tortoise with a 14kt nib) with Fine nibs.  I prefer to use Noodler's Black for signatures.

 

I wonder about the type of paper your office uses for signatures and such?  If you buy a pen with a broad nib and use an ink that feathers or bleeds, your signature may look like a hot mess. 


Edited by Cake, 01 December 2013 - 01:58.


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#42 Ghost Plane

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 02:01

If you call FPH, they can get other nib sizes for you. But many are being discontinued, so don't wait too long if you want a BB or oblique.

#43 NJguy

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 04:34

Yes, I'll say it again as I really appreciate all this great advice everybody has been providing! Gold stars for everyone.

 

For now, the FP will be used mainly for home office business cover letters. So maybe I'll just stick with a regular nib like Bo Bo suggested. I just want the signature to be easily differentiated vs one using a ballpoint pen. According to info on Richard Binder website, I thought I would play it safe and get the Waterman ink so I'm assuming I won't have too much problems with this feathering or bleeding (whatever the heck that means).

 

After looking at Pelican website again, I'm starting to like more and more the Souveran M600. (Pavlov's dog reaction is starting to kick in again).



#44 Pterodactylus

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 07:10

If you want great results (almost) no matter on which paper (also with broad nibs) I suggest to use iron gall ink.
IMO the best choice when you have no control on which paper you have to write.
Such as e.g. Rohrer & Klingner - Salix or Scabiosa, or ESS Registrars Blue Black.
The Mods disabled my account, so I can't reply here.
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#45 proton007

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 11:46

Yes, I'll say it again as I really appreciate all this great advice everybody has been providing! Gold stars for everyone.

 

For now, the FP will be used mainly for home office business cover letters. So maybe I'll just stick with a regular nib like Bo Bo suggested. I just want the signature to be easily differentiated vs one using a ballpoint pen. According to info on Richard Binder website, I thought I would play it safe and get the Waterman ink so I'm assuming I won't have too much problems with this feathering or bleeding (whatever the heck that means).

 

After looking at Pelican website again, I'm starting to like more and more the Souveran M600. (Pavlov's dog reaction is starting to kick in again).

 

Feathering means the ink spreads more than when its laid down by the nib:

Bernanke-Rhodia-grid.jpg

 

 

Bleeding means it shows on the other side of the paper:

bleed.jpg

 

 

As long as you use good quality paper (decent printer paper) it should suffice.


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#46 Sasha Royale

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 14:23

Put a $500 pen aside, until the ink is full of dried ink.  Then, reveal it to sign an important document, and FAIL to make it write.

You won't like the results.

.

A "flamboyant" supervisor wore a gold Rolex watch ATOP his shirt cuff.  After leaving the self-winder on his night stand for a three-day weekend, he came into our office wearing all its glory, and had to ask the time.  Still laughing after 15 years.

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#47 proton007

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 14:29

If you want great results (almost) no matter on which paper (also with broad nibs) I suggest to use iron gall ink.
IMO the best choice when you have no control on which paper you have to write.
Such as e.g. Rohrer & Klingner - Salix or Scabiosa, or ESS Registrars Blue Black.

 

I'd never recommend iron gall to anyone unless they know what they're doing.


In a world where there are no eyes the sun would not be light, and in a world where there were no soft skins rocks would not be hard, nor in a world where there were no muscles would they be heavy. Existence is relationship and you're smack in the middle of it.

- Alan Watts


#48 Pterodactylus

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 15:45

I'd never recommend iron gall to anyone unless they know what they're doing.


And the reason is why?

In my experience especially Salix and Scabiosa are very easy to use, behave exceptional, have fantastic writing attributes (great shading, cool color shift) on most papers (no feathering, bleed or show through) , excellent line definition, are waterproof, and are not maintenance intensive (very easy to clean, in opposite to many highly saturated inks especially from Noodler's and Private Reserve).

The fear some people have to use iron gall ink is IMO unnecessary and irrational as modern IG ink have nothing in common with ancient aggressive formulations.

I use Scabiosa permanently in a Pelikan 100N and Salix in my Ahab.
No special care taken, I don't even flush it between refills, just refill them again and again, done.
No negative things observed the last year, (permanently inked up with them)

You should not let pens dry out with it, but this is also valid for non IG inks.
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#49 max dog

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 00:04

Perhaps once the OP starts using a Pelikan he may like to use it not only for signatures a few times a month, but all his writing every day. For someone new to fountain pens, a broad nib might be a little much, especially if they are use to the finer lines of ball points and roller balls.  Why limit yourself to just signatures with a broad nib.  I would recommend an M400 fitted with a medium or even fine nib, as the M400 tends to write juicy and wet, and is the lowest in cost of the Souveran line.  I love mine for everyday writing and the occasional signature is well served by the wet line of the M400 nib.


Edited by max dog, 02 December 2013 - 00:05.


#50 proton007

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:08

You should not let pens dry out with it, but this is also valid for non IG inks.

 

Yes, but a non IG ink can be removed after an overnight soak in water. IG will take considerably longer and need other treatment (ammonia etc).

 

Not worth the effort.


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#51 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 23:53

If the OP gets a nice 200/205/215, he can get 4 or five nibs for it.

That would cover all bases, and let him play Nib of the Day.

He can see what each nib width or grind of oblique does for @ $25 each.

 

Many folks say, they are going to do that, and end up buying a pen with that nib anyway.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#52 NJguy

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:48

Sorry, playing "Nib of the Day" is not up my alley. I prefer having a tea party with my stuffed animals:



#53 PatientType

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 00:53

Do you really mean this seriously?

He is a FP newbie, he does not want to spend time to learn how to use a FP correctly and you recommend him a pen with a springy nib and even more questionable a cursive italic nib?

Do you really think he can use a CI BB nib right away?

I don't think so, I agree with Bo Bo Olson that this man need a hard spherical nail nib, one he can't damage easily and use like a ballpoint.


I can't speak to the experience of others but I find it hard to imagine that anyone that is capable of writing in cursive could not pick up a Pelikan M1000 and sign their name on the very first try.  The M1000 has a springy nib but it hardly requires any special experience to use.  It is only springy - not flexible - and that little bit of spring will give some line variation.  That line variation will be the signature flair that would identify the pen as desirable for signatures.  Visually, a signature written with a hard steel nib is not going to be much different than a signature written with a gel pen.  

So yes, seriously, when I've been asked by someone hoping to use fountain pens with an eye to a prettier signature, I typically suggest the Pelikan M1000 if they might be in that price range.  It doesn't have the learning curve of a truly flexible nib and one need not be careful about writing with the sweet spot as with a ground cursive italic.  I've not once had anyone come back to say they were unable to sign their name with one.  More typically, they've tried the pen out at one of the pen shops in the area or tried one of mine and then they bought one of their own.



#54 NJguy

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 01:30

But if I choose a Stub nib instead of a Round nib, wouldn't that give me line variation that would be different than that of a gel pen?



#55 proton007

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 03:19

But if I choose a Stub nib instead of a Round nib, wouldn't that give me line variation that would be different than that of a gel pen?

 

Yes it will.


Edited by proton007, 10 December 2013 - 03:20.

In a world where there are no eyes the sun would not be light, and in a world where there were no soft skins rocks would not be hard, nor in a world where there were no muscles would they be heavy. Existence is relationship and you're smack in the middle of it.

- Alan Watts


#56 NJguy

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 03:50

Thanks PatientType for your viewpoint. The M1000 is sweet, but a couple hundred over my price range.

If I find that I really like the feel and outcome of it vs the M600 or M800, I might save a little bit more and get the M1000.

 

So, off to the Fountain Pen Hospital I will go. I'm wondering if these pens ever go on sale sometime, like right after the holidays? Perhaps buy one, get one free? (hey, I can wish)


Edited by NJguy, 10 December 2013 - 03:51.


#57 DrCodfish

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 16:32

But if I choose a Stub nib instead of a Round nib, wouldn't that give me line variation that would be different than that of a gel pen?

 

Definitely.  I have a custom ground stub nib (0.6mm) from John Motishaw in my blue strip M600 which is perhaps my very favorite (certainly top 3) pen.  If you wish to have a B or BB nib stubbed you'll need to have someone, most likely a 'nibmeister' do the work for you.  There are many reputable craftspersons who can do this.  The Stb will be a very expressive (line variation) pen, especially compared to a gel pen, and is much less demading than an italic nib. 

 

Again, be sure to post once you get your pen, hope it gives you the kind of results you are looking for. 

 

PS Be sure to take some of your office stationery or forms with you, nothing is more dissapointing than  using a great pen on crappy paper, and then compare that with how the pen writes on FP friendly paper.



#58 NJguy

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 16:47

Oh, with all this great advice I've been given it's a must that I report back to everybody once I purchase the pen!

 

I may decide to wait till after the holidays and see how my bank account is then. Because the M600 looks like a great pen, but I'm afraid I'm going to fall in love with either the M800 or M100.



#59 NJguy

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 01:20

By the way, the M800 has "solid brass inner components" while the M600 doesn't. What's the benefit of that?



#60 sargetalon

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 02:56

By the way, the M800 has "solid brass inner components" while the M600 doesn't. What's the benefit of that?

 

The brass components give the M800 more heft making it a more substantial pen in both size and weight compared to the M600.


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