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Indian Pens: Which To Buy, Which To Avoid

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#61 LWJ2

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 17:32

LWJ2,

 

I was wondering about these pens as well, they seem to be a little less refined in workmanship, compared to others, and as a fair proportion of named Indian brands do not even sign their pens, I was wondering if they are as such, but it might be fruitless if we ask the vendor.

 

Also, there could very well be smaller provincial makers who just make pens without even using a trade name, so these pens might be those. 

 

I'm leaning toward "smaller provincial makers"  myself. These aren't as polished, but are pleasant to handle without slipping in the hand. I could put them on my lathe and apply a slurry of Bon Ami, but I really don't care that much for a mirror finish anyhow.



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#62 Berelleza

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 18:42

My experience with FPR Indian pens: wortless.  i have tried a few and had to throw them in the trashcan. Experienced extrem conditions of blurping, leaking, etc..  I had saved two Serwex nibs and I was able to insert them in a very old Pierre Cardin pen (that's what it says on the clip) that has sentimental value for me. I have had th pen  for around 20 years and I tried experiemnting with the nib until I ruined it.  Now it works fabulously with a SERWEX F nib. Cool.

 

Now, I am trying an eyedropper for the last time, a Wality  from ASA. I was hoping to get one of the flex nibs on FPR but they don't say on which pens they fit, sooooo.... what can I do? Search the website? Too cumbersome!


Edited by Oldtimer, 06 August 2015 - 18:42.


#63 MontPelikan

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 22:34

Hello,

 

here is a little review of the Gama Eyas. Nice eyedropper pen.

 

Thank you for watching

 

MontPelikan



#64 5thhistorian

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 13:36

My latest Indian pen is a Click "Aristocrat" (according to the Ebay listing) or "Tulip" (according to the packaging). Just before it arrived I saw that FPR is using this as their newest "house" pen. I really like it. A big plastic pen with a decent no. 6 nib and designed almost exactly like the original Parker Duofold. I ordered the orange version because it looks a lot like the old "Big Red". Comes with a couple of long international cartridges of blue ink, and a simple cartridge converter. The generic blue ink is too washed out for my taste so I'm going to try the included converter. The whole pen is very light, about 15-20 grams. My cost shipped was 10 USD but you can probably find it for cheaper in India.



#65 MontPelikan

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 19:27

Hello,

 

I inked up my QUICK Majestic for a little review today:

 

 

Thank you for watching

 

MontPelikan



#66 Gh0st_S3c

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 09:39

ASA PENS are a great buy. They are completely handmade and are extremely durable. The pens are crafted by a penmaker with decades of experience. I have an ASA Nauka and its an amazing pen. In fact I like  it more than my Mont Blanc.

You can check out their website here: http://asapens.in 

 

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#67 NibsForScript

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 16:39

ASA PENS are a great buy. They are completely handmade and are extremely durable. The pens are crafted by a penmaker with decades of experience. I have an ASA Nauka and its an amazing pen. In fact I like  it more than my Mont Blanc.

You can check out their website here: http://asapens.in 

 

I am really tempted to buy one. I like the shape of the section and location of the threads. Reminiscent of the Oldwin design. I have a pen with a similar shape made in the US and I love it. It is my favorite pen. I guess it is the fact that the"section" allows for different grip variations.  I will have to jump in and order one. Thanks



#68 tleek

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 02:36

I am a huge fan of Indian pens. I do not have as much as experience with them as many members here, but I will give you my take on them. I own two Noodler's Ahabs, a Konrad, Nib Creaper, and Acrylic Konrad, an Asa I Can, and a newly acquired FPR Himalaya that came with a free Muft. I haven't used the Muft. I also have an Airmail Ebonite eyedropper on the way. Although FPR and Noodlers are owned by Americans their pens are Indian made so I still consider them Indian pens. In some ways you get what you pay for. In my limited experience the fit and finish on Indian pens isn't the greatest. Even on the Handmade Asa machine marks are slightly visible and the cap threads are a bit sticky. I ordered the Asa with a german nib upgrade, but the feed wasn't set and the tines were spread so far apart that the pen flowed inconsistently. I, however, like to tinker, and beginning the hobby with Noodler's forced me to learn to set feeds and adjust nibs. Its part of the hobby that can be really frustrating, but also something I thoroughly enjoy. Also, keep in mind that most of these pens were under thirty dollars, and while you can get better fit and finish from mass produced pens for the same price, Metropolitans, Safaris etc, Indian pens have incredible character. The designs are often classic but distinct and the materials available are beautiful and affordable. I prefer vegetal resin, acrylic, and ebonite over metal bodied pens or typical injection molded plastics, and it feels great to hold and write with the giant I Can. Also, consider that most handmade Indian pens are eyedroppers so you are not paying for a filling system. I'd highly recommend all of the brands I have mentioned. I think you will enjoy them as much as I do, especially if you know what to expect. My next Indian pen will probably be another Asa or a Gama.





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