Jump to content



Photo

Something I Discovered About Early Pen Production

vintage pen production

  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#21 Vintagepens

Vintagepens

    David Nishimura

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,090 posts

Posted 29 September 2013 - 00:35

Wonderful machines -- fewer and fewer in use. When the contents of machine shops go to auction nowadays, screw machines typically sell for scrap value. Sad but true.

 

Good to keep in mind that in the panoply of machining, there are many intermediate levels of mechanical automation between a simple bench lathe and CNC.



#22 SteveE

SteveE

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Location:Chicago Area
  • Flag:

Posted 30 September 2013 - 18:05

Chris - I doubt that I would have made much of an impression at the show.  I'm just another grey-haired guy of average height and build, wearing eyeglasses.  Kind of sounds like a whole generation of us, I think.  I purchased one of the replica DuoFold button-fillers you had in a rack on the table.  Mine has a modern nib - a great broad (or BB?) stub/cursive italic nib that works really well in everyday use -- as long as I keep a bottle of ink nearby.  We both (the pen and I) like the effect of lots of ink on the paper.

 

I'll be watching to see what your next projects may be.  After the enjoyment the first has brought, I'd go for another in an instant.  I'm glad to see you back here.



#23 EdZ

EdZ

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Bronze

  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 May 2014 - 17:00

Any Doufold made in the Uk most likely used Whitworth threads, they are inch dims but just different enough to cause the issue you speak of.



#24 peterg

peterg

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 218 posts

Posted 03 June 2014 - 20:43

I very much doubt whether Parker used imperial threads in their pen production. It would have required a redesign of the pen and caused problems with parts interchangeability. Also, I believe the Newhaven tooling was imported from America.

 

With pens you are not talking about fitting generic parts, so it makes no sense to use different thread forms.

 

Similarly Ford cars manufactured here had American threads (while most of the UK owned manufacturers switched during 1950's), rather than use imperial threads



#25 The M

The M

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Silver

  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 04 June 2014 - 19:34

I know one of the former parker executives before parker was bought out and fired everyone. When we talked he was telling me that with the Duofolds the workers where not paid for the number of product that they produced ,but paid based on how many where perfect. So I think that there may have been some differences just based on that and the different production plants.



#26 Lazard 20

Lazard 20

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 359 posts

Posted 04 June 2014 - 20:45

If it is helpful; Parker´s screw machines department circa 1925.

 

Parker_screw_departament_1925_Lazard.jpg


Edited by Lazard 20, 04 June 2014 - 20:56.


#27 white_lotus

white_lotus

    Vintage

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 785 posts
  • Location:New York state
  • Flag:

Posted 04 June 2014 - 21:31

OK, I don't know anything about vintage pen production, so what are "screw machines"? Seems like a lot of stuff to make screws. What do the gals on the left do?



#28 Vintagepens

Vintagepens

    David Nishimura

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,090 posts

Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:38

Wikipedia entry is here.

Basically, mechanically-programmed automatic lathes.



#29 white_lotus

white_lotus

    Vintage

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 785 posts
  • Location:New York state
  • Flag:

Posted 05 June 2014 - 12:34

Thanks!



#30 Zookie

Zookie

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 238 posts
  • Location:The Twilight Zone,New York
  • Flag:

Posted 05 June 2014 - 17:55

I thought the girls on the left did the female threads, while the guys on the right do the male ones :rolleyes:



#31 Lou Erickson

Lou Erickson

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts
  • Location:Silicon Valley, CA

Posted 09 June 2014 - 23:10

I'll look for them. Perhaps a reader here will have a web address.

TechShop is at http://www.techshop.ws/

 

I am a member, and am very pleased with them.  I'm taking the classes needed to run a number of the interesting CNC machines.  There isn't one close to you yet, but they are growing.  They only add a couple of shops a year, though.


-- 

Lou Erickson - Handwritten Blog Posts


#32 OcalaFlGuy

OcalaFlGuy

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,016 posts
  • Location:North Central Florida USA
  • Flag:

Posted 10 June 2014 - 02:52

I thought the girls on the left did the female threads, while the guys on the right do the male ones :rolleyes:

 

<Missing clapping hands emoticon x 3 >

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl



#33 OcalaFlGuy

OcalaFlGuy

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,016 posts
  • Location:North Central Florida USA
  • Flag:

Posted 10 June 2014 - 02:57

In another life, when I worked around a Semiconductor Wafer Fabrication unit, about 95% of the workers than worked "hands on" with the semiconductor wafers were women.  They have distinct advantages in eye hand coordination and manual dexterity.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl