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Stipula Vedo Converter Doesn't Fit?

stipula vedo converter

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8 replies to this topic

#1 StrawberryJam

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 03:47

I feel really stupid asking for help on this, but....

 

I recently won a stipula vedo off ebay (yay), except I am having problems getting the converter to fit properly.  I see that there is a little plastic protrusion that sticks out from the back of the nib section:

 

UY3Sk8o.jpg

 

but i can't figure out how to get the converter to fit snugly.  I assume that the protrusion is supposed to fit into the open top of the converter, but for some reason it doesn't fit.  I can't seem push it in directly either, nor does the push-and-twist mechanism seem to work:

 

Fv9op9b.jpg

 

So..what am I doing wrong?


Current Wishlist:

Visconti, Visconti, and...more Visconti! (And some ST Duponts too). (Ok fine, getting on the Omas and Montblanc trains now too. Toot toot.) (And maybe on the Montegrappa one too, but only for the Miyas.) 


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#2 StrawberryJam

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 14:49

Nevermind, I figured it out this morning.  Turns out I just had to push harder, straight in (instead of trying to do a push-and-turn thing like you do with the Pilot converters). 

 

But now my nib is skipping, in particular if I try to hold the pen at an angle or on an upstroke.   :(


Current Wishlist:

Visconti, Visconti, and...more Visconti! (And some ST Duponts too). (Ok fine, getting on the Omas and Montblanc trains now too. Toot toot.) (And maybe on the Montegrappa one too, but only for the Miyas.) 


#3 kauloltran

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 17:44

Nevermind, I figured it out this morning.  Turns out I just had to push harder, straight in (instead of trying to do a push-and-turn thing like you do with the Pilot converters). 

 

But now my nib is skipping, in particular if I try to hold the pen at an angle or on an upstroke.   :(

 

Skipping is most likely caused by dried inks inside the feed, which is a common issue in used pens that were not cleaned properly. Misaligned tines may also cause skipping. If your pen also writes dry, then dried ink is probably the cause. Flushing the pen in concentrated ammonia will solve the problem. Some people might suggest a dilution, but conc. ammonia is perfectly safe on plastic. For celluloid and other materials, a dilution is necessary.


Edited by kauloltran, 03 September 2013 - 17:46.


#4 StrawberryJam

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 17:51

 

Skipping is most likely caused by dried inks inside the feed, which is a common issue in used pens that were not cleaned properly. Misaligned tines may also cause skipping. If your pen also writes dry, then dried ink is probably the cause. Flushing the pen in concentrated ammonia will solve the problem. Some people might suggest a dilution, but conc. ammonia is perfectly safe on plastic. For celluloid and other materials, a dilution is necessary.

 

Yeah, I flushed already with water and then with pen flush.  Going to check the nib alignment next. 


Current Wishlist:

Visconti, Visconti, and...more Visconti! (And some ST Duponts too). (Ok fine, getting on the Omas and Montblanc trains now too. Toot toot.) (And maybe on the Montegrappa one too, but only for the Miyas.) 


#5 kauloltran

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 19:03

 

Yeah, I flushed already with water and then with pen flush.  Going to check the nib alignment next. 

Flushing with water won't help to dissolve the dried ink. Those pen flush solutions are nothing more than marketing gimmicks. Try conc. ammonia.



#6 StrawberryJam

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 19:17

Flushing with water won't help to dissolve the dried ink. Those pen flush solutions are nothing more than marketing gimmicks. Try conc. ammonia.

 

I'll take a look.  There shouldn't be any dried ink because the pen is supposed to be new, but you never know what you get from the factory.


Current Wishlist:

Visconti, Visconti, and...more Visconti! (And some ST Duponts too). (Ok fine, getting on the Omas and Montblanc trains now too. Toot toot.) (And maybe on the Montegrappa one too, but only for the Miyas.) 


#7 raging.dragon

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 02:58

Does the ink flow better if you apply a bit of pressure (spreading the tines a fraction of a mm) while writing? Stipulas seem to be adjusted for ballpoint users with a heavy hand, leading to skipping when used with a lighter hand.



#8 StrawberryJam

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 04:34

Does the ink flow better if you apply a bit of pressure (spreading the tines a fraction of a mm) while writing? Stipulas seem to be adjusted for ballpoint users with a heavy hand, leading to skipping when used with a lighter hand.

 

Hmm, I've found that with this particular nib, I have to keep the pen at almost exactly a 45 degree angle for the pen to lay down a line that does not skip.  If i try to rotate the nib just slightly left or right (for example, lifting the pen on an edge), it will skip.  Almost makes me feel like I have an italic or stub, but it's supposed to be a medium.


Current Wishlist:

Visconti, Visconti, and...more Visconti! (And some ST Duponts too). (Ok fine, getting on the Omas and Montblanc trains now too. Toot toot.) (And maybe on the Montegrappa one too, but only for the Miyas.) 


#9 wimg

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 21:32

 

Hmm, I've found that with this particular nib, I have to keep the pen at almost exactly a 45 degree angle for the pen to lay down a line that does not skip.  If i try to rotate the nib just slightly left or right (for example, lifting the pen on an edge), it will skip.  Almost makes me feel like I have an italic or stub, but it's supposed to be a medium.

 

Sounds like it may be a bit sharpish on the edges in that case, IOW, not having completely rounded edges, and maybe in conjunction with a partial baby bottom.

 

That's fixable. :D

 

Warm regards, Wim


the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever






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