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Waterman South Seas Blue


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40 replies to this topic

#1 wimg

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 22:04

Hi all,

Here is the promised big review of Waterman South Seas Blue, a rather funky, bright, joyous colour of ink, IMO anyway.

Page 1:
Posted Image

Page 2:
Posted Image

Page 3:
Posted Image

Enjoy!

Warm regards, Wim

P.S.: I am currently reviewing all of my blues, so expect some more this week... :D

Edited by wimg, 08 November 2010 - 23:57.
Fixed links

the Mad Dutchman
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#2 Leslie J.

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 22:54

The scan is true to my perception of SSB. :) It is a nice tropical colour. Kind of the definitive turquoise blue ink IMO.
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#3 Ann Finley

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 02:01

Posted Image


Edited by Ann Finley, 12 October 2007 - 20:31.


#4 wimg

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 20:32

Hi Ann,

Wow! I wish I could write like that! Beautiful! And thanks for the kind words.

BTW, my experience with SS Blue is that it doesn't get darker sitting in a pen for a long time, either. The pen it sits in constantly, is the Waterman Gentleman with OB nib. It is just supposed to be in there, it asks for it :D.
Just that it doesn't get used often, and sometimes it goes between fills for a very long time. But always writes straight away, first stroke on paper.

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#5 KCat

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 20:48

Hi Ann,

Wow! I wish I could write like that! Beautiful! And thanks for the kind words.

well... practice and post your practice sessions along with mine (yeah, I know... I haven't posted them recently. Still too shy about it.)

KCat
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#6 Bryan

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 20:53

I've read so many good things about Waterman SSB and now having read your review, I'm convinced that I need to go out and buy a bottle!

Thanks for the great review.

Bryan
Posted Image

#7 georgem

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 01:05

My experience with South Seas Blue becoming darker in an unused pen is exactly the opposite. I've found that if I allow the pen containing it to lie in the box, unused, for as little as a few days, the ink will appear almost blue-black for a good part of a page before becoming lighter.

I've even found that if I pause writing for a period of time, upon resuming, the ink is darker for a few characters, or even an entire line before becoming light turquoise in appearance again.

That said, the color Wim's scans look just like my own pages written with South Seas Blue before it has had the chance to darken in the pen.

Finally, although those who know me have commented that my handwriting has improved, after looking at Ann's, I can only say (with apologies to Frost) that I've miles to write and volumes to fill before I will even approach such elegance.
George

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#8 southpaw

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 10:57

Wim,
Another great written review! SSB was one of the first inks I got and I like it very much, often more than Florida Blue. I guess that's because it's so bright. Looking forward to the next blue review!
"But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us." (Rom. 5:8, NKJV)

#9 wimg

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 21:26

Hi Bryan,

I've read so many good things about Waterman SSB and now having read your review, I'm convinced that I need to go out and buy a bottle!

Thanks for the great review.

Bryan

Thank you for the kind word!
And yes, It is a great ink. It is one of my favourite colours, which is why I always have the Gentleman loaded with SSB with me, even if I don't use it very often.

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#10 wimg

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 21:31

Hi George,

My experience with South Seas Blue becoming darker in an unused pen is exactly the opposite. I've found that if I allow the pen containing it to lie in the box, unused, for as little as a few days, the ink will appear almost blue-black for a good part of a page before becoming lighter.

Wow, then it really must dry out quite considerably. I guess it may have to do with the pen a lot. I use it in my Gentleman almost exclusively.

I've even found that if I pause writing for a period of time, upon resuming, the ink is darker for a few characters, or even an entire line before becoming light turquoise in appearance again.

Strange, that, shouldn't really. You're not living in a hot, dry climate by any chance?

That said, the color Wim's scans look just like my own pages written with South Seas Blue before it has had the chance to darken in the pen.

Well, I have to admit it took a lot of fiddling before I got the scans to look on screen like the real thing, but I think I finally succeeded. Even the paper looks slightly yellowish now, which it really does :D.

Finally, although those who know me have commented that my handwriting has improved, after looking at Ann's, I can only say (with apologies to Frost) that I've miles to write and volumes to fill before I will even approach such elegance.

Join the club :D. Another member here... :lol:

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#11 wimg

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 21:36

Hi southpaw,

Wim,
Another great written review!  SSB was one of the first inks I got and I like it very much, often more than Florida Blue.  I guess that's because it's so bright.  Looking forward to the next blue review!

Thanks for the compliment! It is a colour ink I used many years ago, and which I have always liked, exactly because it is so nice and bright. It reminds of of a nice and bright sunshiny day...

Regarding the next review, I have been lining up all the inks, and sloshed some of it onto some pages already, the dip nib part that is. Was waiting for my other pens to dry after some thorough flushing and rinsing. It takes a lot of time, doing that with as many pens I am using now in the reviews, I can assure you. It's a lot slower and more tedious going than I ever expected, but I'm sure I'll keep it up :D.

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#12 wimg

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 21:38

Hi KCat,

well...  practice and post your practice sessions along with mine (yeah, I know... I haven't posted them recently.  Still too shy about it.)

Well, ummm, uhhhhh... you've seen my writing here in these reviews, didn't ya? That's all I can do with a lot of effort... :D

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#13 georgem

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 23:40

When I first started using South Seas Blue, I was using it in a Parker Sonnet. Yes, the pen has noticable evaporation from the nib when not in use.

I'm now using South Seas Blue in a Cross Townsend which has far less evaporation when stored. There is still some darkening of the ink, but not as much as with the Parker Sonnet.

After reading your review, I used the Cross Townsend for my journal writing last night and also at work today.

I'll have to revise my comment about the ink's darkening, at least to the extent that it depends upon the characteristics of the pen into which the ink was placed. More evaporation results in more darkening and vice versa.

Wim, in answer to your question, I live about 60kM north of New York City. In the Fall and Winter (and so far this Spring) it's been colder than usual and relatively dry despite higher than average rain and snowfall. Summer is usually hot and humid. You might have experienced this when you visited Art Brown in NYC.

All in all, this is a very nice ink and I've already gone through two thirds of a bottle.
George

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#14 southpaw

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 00:49

Mrs. Ann,
WOW!!! That's not writing, that's art. Very beautiful. Thanks for sharing it with we mere scribblers.

Wim,
How come your writing doesn't look like that??? :P
"But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us." (Rom. 5:8, NKJV)

#15 Ann Finley

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 05:47

Thanks, folks, for the nice things said about my handwriting.

One doesn't need to be an artist to do calligraphic writing--but it does take time and practice, and there's a limit to how many things we can sqeeze into a lifetime that we'd like to be able to do!

When I look at the books written by professional calligraphers that can do 30+ calligraphic hands, I'm still amazed. I can't even conceive of how they could find the time to do it.

Ann

#16 wimg

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 15:50

Hi George, Southpaw, Ann,

George:
Thanks for your answers to my questions. It does explain things.

Southpaw:
The answer to your question about my handwriting is simple. It is practice. I have practiced my writing for so long now, and so faithfully, that that is the way it looks now. :lol:

Ann:
Thanks again for sharing your lovely writing! I´m pretty sure you will get to the level of the artists you mention. 99.8 % of art is, after all, practice, practice, practice. The rest is inspiration. And you´ve shown to be able to do both. Also, things do go more easily when you reach a certain level, which is something you must have noticed too.

Warm regards, Wim

the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#17 Cloud

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 20:08

does this ink stain in demonstrator pen?
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#18 Diego

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 16:38

I have to rescue that thread. Ann, I'm really impressed with your superb calligraphy! I can't even imagine I could do something like that. At first I thought it was a computer font!

Wimg, thank you both for that excellent review. I never considered turqouise colors and now I'm thinking in buying some cartridges to test it :)

#19 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 22:47

I'm still a 10 ink noobie,
MB Toffee and Waterman SSB are my two best shading inks.

I have it inked with a 400NN '50s semi flex OF,which can be light or darker depending on how much pressure is used.

In Reform 1745 regular Fine, it is light, with a dash of darker shading here and there.

My 400 regular flex M, it is the same shade as Fine but appears lighter in it's a wider line, one sees well what letters or parts of words have been written with more or less pressure.

I have it in A Geha 790 KM, and its wet, dark, and has traces of light shading. It writes dark enough to look a different shade of blue, except for the letters that have less pressure on them.
With this nib, it barks at the moon.

I dipped my 140's semi-flex '50's OB, and found out it needs a bit better paper than the KM to work best.

This was not a real test, just a scribble test,and the KM surprised me by beating my "second/first" nib.
The MB 234 1/2 KOB (First/Second nib) and the 140 OB, beat the Geha KM with Toffee. I've not run the KOB through this ink yet.
Some day I will.

But until I do my wet writing KM appears to be the best dancing nib with this ink.

I like that SSB ink. I got four pens inked with it, yesterday it was six. I did not test them, I just took turns scribbling.

How ever, I took the ink out of Lamy's Blue Black and Violet cartridges and put them in inkwells, so I needed a couple of pens.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#20 jniforat

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 14:59

great review. page 2 of the review is especially useful because it shows how different nibs (f, m, b, bb, or Ci, italic, OB, etc) really bring out different attributes of the ink! very informative. i'll probably reference this article when people ask, "Does the size of the nib change shading, color, etc., of ink?"






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