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Ef Nib Seems Very Broad // Comparison Photo Included

pelikan m200 pelikan m200 ef extra fine pelikan m200 ef nib broad flex

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#1 heymatthew

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 22:54

Hello all,

A while back I purchased a NOS M100 (the white and black version). It had an M nib, but was EXTREMELY broad so I quickly sold it. I normally use EF pens and have started getting into flex pens just a bit for some special writing (they can't ALL be daily writers, right? :D). Anyway... I recently purchased an M205 in black and chrome and I absolutely LOVE everything about the pen (size, weight, color, etc.), but the nib is driving me CRAZY.

 

It's VERY broad. The Pelikan EF is significantly broader than any of my other EF nibs (I've included a photo comparing it to a Lamy, Edison and TWSBI because they are all steel nibs and are all German, like the Pelikan) and is actually more similar to my wife's Lamy Broad nibs. Is it normal for Pelikan nibs to be this much more broad than their other German counterparts? It also exhibits a surprising amount of flex with just slight pressure (which is where the broad line is coming from, I think). 

 

I'm wondering if I should just part with it and get something else or if I should maybe send it to a nibmeister and see if I can't get it ground to an actual EF. Since I don't have other Pelikans to compare it to, I'd love your input here. If this doesn't seem to be normal, then I may contact Pelikan and see what they suggest (I've heard they have great customer service so I'm hoping maybe I can just swap the nib or something). 

 

Thanks in advance for any insight you can offer. I want to love this pen, but if it's going to write this broad, I don't think I'll be able to make a spot for it in the case. :( 

 

Best,

Matthew

 

9584235179_ac29b5d37d_h.jpg


No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

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#2 Indy_Pen_Dance

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:24

Matthew,

 

Pelikan puts a good deal of iridium on their nibs.  It seems that the belief is that this is necessary to make the nib smooth, when in fact it is not.  I find that at a bare minimum the Pelikan nibs should be "slab sided" as I was taught by Richard before they are ready to go and frequently I have been asked to grind them to make them a "true" XF nib.  The other issue that we face is that the Asian nibs are finer by nature than the other nibs so if you were to get a Pilot VP with an XF nib, for example, it would likely be finer than other XF nibs that we are used to here in the states.

 

If you like your Pelikan (and I personally love mine) then I wouldn't give up on the pen if it were me.  I would just grind it down to the point you want it.  Most any of us that grind nibs should be able to match it pretty close to your favored line width.  If you want to have an even better chance of that happening, send one of your other pens off with it so that it can be matched in the hand of the nib specialist that is doing the work.  I have found that when I grind nibs I can match line width by measuring the line of the nib after I have finished it and the line of a written note by the owner - and if I have the pen I can match them even better since I know that the pressure put on each pen is the same (since I am doing the writing) and thus when back in the owners hand it should react pretty much the same since the pressure on each pen is equal, even though likely different from my own.  

 

Hope this helps!  Have fun with your pens, whatever you decide to do!

 

Linda



#3 heymatthew

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 02:33

Matthew,

 

Pelikan puts a good deal of iridium on their nibs.  It seems that the belief is that this is necessary to make the nib smooth, when in fact it is not.  I find that at a bare minimum the Pelikan nibs should be "slab sided" as I was taught by Richard before they are ready to go and frequently I have been asked to grind them to make them a "true" XF nib.  The other issue that we face is that the Asian nibs are finer by nature than the other nibs so if you were to get a Pilot VP with an XF nib, for example, it would likely be finer than other XF nibs that we are used to here in the states.

 

If you like your Pelikan (and I personally love mine) then I wouldn't give up on the pen if it were me.  I would just grind it down to the point you want it.  Most any of us that grind nibs should be able to match it pretty close to your favored line width.  If you want to have an even better chance of that happening, send one of your other pens off with it so that it can be matched in the hand of the nib specialist that is doing the work.  I have found that when I grind nibs I can match line width by measuring the line of the nib after I have finished it and the line of a written note by the owner - and if I have the pen I can match them even better since I know that the pressure put on each pen is the same (since I am doing the writing) and thus when back in the owners hand it should react pretty much the same since the pressure on each pen is equal, even though likely different from my own.  

 

Hope this helps!  Have fun with your pens, whatever you decide to do!

 

Linda

 

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No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

#4 sargetalon

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 02:48

Hello Matthew.  Your experience has been the same as mine.  My M205 with EF nib gives a similar performance as  yours.  Interestingly, my M200 F's actually write like what I would expect from an F.  They are amazing pens though and I would get some nib work done if I were you rather than part with the pen.  I think you might regret giving it up later.


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#5 heymatthew

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:00

Matthew,

 

Pelikan puts a good deal of iridium on their nibs.  It seems that the belief is that this is necessary to make the nib smooth, when in fact it is not.  I find that at a bare minimum the Pelikan nibs should be "slab sided" as I was taught by Richard before they are ready to go and frequently I have been asked to grind them to make them a "true" XF nib.  The other issue that we face is that the Asian nibs are finer by nature than the other nibs so if you were to get a Pilot VP with an XF nib, for example, it would likely be finer than other XF nibs that we are used to here in the states.

 

If you like your Pelikan (and I personally love mine) then I wouldn't give up on the pen if it were me.  I would just grind it down to the point you want it.  Most any of us that grind nibs should be able to match it pretty close to your favored line width.  If you want to have an even better chance of that happening, send one of your other pens off with it so that it can be matched in the hand of the nib specialist that is doing the work.  I have found that when I grind nibs I can match line width by measuring the line of the nib after I have finished it and the line of a written note by the owner - and if I have the pen I can match them even better since I know that the pressure put on each pen is the same (since I am doing the writing) and thus when back in the owners hand it should react pretty much the same since the pressure on each pen is equal, even though likely different from my own.  

 

Hope this helps!  Have fun with your pens, whatever you decide to do!

 

Linda

 

Linda,

Sent you guys a contact form on your website about grinding my nib for me. Thanks again for the time and consideration you put into your reply. I'd love for you guys to do the work on my M200 for me! :D


No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

#6 heymatthew

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:01

Hello Matthew.  Your experience has been the same as mine.  My M205 with EF nib gives a similar performance as  yours.  Interestingly, my M200 F's actually write like what I would expect from an F.  They are amazing pens though and I would get some nib work done if I were you rather than part with the pen.  I think you might regret giving it up later.

 

Thank you for chiming in on this. It makes me feel better to know that it's fairly normal. I really regret selling the M100 I had. Especially since it was the white/black "Storm Trooper" pen. I may try and find another one of these days. 

 

Thanks again. Your input is much appreciated. 


No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

#7 Laura N

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 04:12

If you got this from an official US reseller, you can exchange the nib for one that is true to size.  Email Pelikan USA repair through Chartpak and ask.

 

I have an M200 with an EF nib that is the normal width you'd expect.



#8 heymatthew

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 04:14

If you got this from an official US reseller, you can exchange the nib for one that is true to size.  Email Pelikan USA repair through Chartpak and ask.
 
I have an M200 with an EF nib that is the normal width you'd expect.


Unfortunately I got it secondhand. I do have all the original paperwork though so they might honor the warranty. I'll contact them before sending anything off to be modified.

Thank you!
No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

#9 Pennata Penna

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 05:46

I'd buy a gold EF or XXF from a reputable dealer/nibmeister, then DIY the steel EF into a stub etc. Then with a second body you get two pens.. Profit! :-D

Tony
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#10 heymatthew

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 13:04

I'd buy a gold EF or XXF from a reputable dealer/nibmeister, then DIY the steel EF into a stub etc. Then with a second body you get two pens.. Profit! :-D

Tony

 

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No, that's not blood. That's Noodler's Antietam.

#11 jgrasty

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 14:21

Pelikan nibs have gotten fatter over time.  I just picked up a 400N with an EF nib that writes probably 1/3 the width of a modern M200 EF nib.  The 400N nib is a bit scratchy, but its flexibility more than makes up for it.


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Joey

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#12 Indy_Pen_Dance

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 22:29

You are quite welcome Matthew!  Received your email and sent you a response.  Thank you for the contact :)

 

Linda



#13 pajaro

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 03:10

Years ago a representative from Fahrney's told me that German nibs are about a size larger than American nibs.  I have found some Pelikan M400 nibs to be a tad bit broad for their size, medium mostly.  The Pelikan EF nibs I have used on my M400 and M640 were about right.  I have a fine for my M200, and find it fine enough that I don't need to get an EF nib for the M200.  I am somewhat baffled by Pelikan, in that sometimes they get it right, sometimes a bit too generous.  I think there's handwork on the nibs, introducing the expertise of the finisher as a variable.  I made an accomodation with the M400/M200 that I would accept the fines and accept the wonderfully extra fine on the M640.  I don't use them much any more, but I think I will go back to them, so I haven't gotten rid of them.  Got rid of the M800s and M1000s, though.  Not a cozy enough size for me.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pelikan, m200, pelikan m200, ef, extra fine, pelikan m200 ef, nib, broad, flex



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