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Richard Binder Nib Treatment.

richard binder binderized nib brick and mortar

36 replies to this topic

#1 rumbleroar

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 22:08

Hey, so I'm going to get a VP XF soon, and I know that the nib on that one is particularly fine, and as such it can be scratchy (sometimes).  I've heard that Richard Binder 'Binderizes' the nibs for free, but honestly, I would prefer to make such an expensive purchase from my local brick and mortar store.  It's my first expensive pen, and I want to make sure that I like the feel of it.  Is the nib difference that big?

I'm buying it for the super fine nib, so if it's worth it at all I'll probably get it from R.B., but how much does it help?  Does anyone have any experience with a super fine nib that was binderized?  Thank you!



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#2 jar

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 22:18

Have you asked your local B&M if they will check the nib and make sure it is smooth before delivery?


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#3 Centopar

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 22:22

I have a Binderized F - it's orders of magnitude better than the non-Binderized F nibs I sampled in Japan (four of 'em), all of which were disappointingly scratchy. I'd go with Richard; you'll be able to know you're getting something perfectly adjusted.

 

If you're worried about whether you'll get on with the VP, I'd go to a bricks and mortar store and try one; some don't get on with the position of the clip. But I can't recommend Richard's work enough, and if it's your first spendy pen it's worth getting right. 

 

The F is like a western XF, and it's amazingly smooth. A lovely, loopy, lacy writer. I lent my Binderized one to a friend (a fountain pen user; not all of my friends are allowed to touch, much less use my pens!) and his precise words on using it were: "CHRIST. This thing is like butter on velvet."



#4 cadfael_tex

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 22:29

I'm not one to generally steer folks away from local businesses but I do believe you've found my exception. Richard has spoiled me. I am very hesitant to buy a pen from anywhere else - or at least not from a nibmeister run shop. I have a VP fine that I got from somewhere else and it was really a very fine instrument right ou of the box. However, the cursive italic I got from Richard this week is on a whole different plane.

#5 Laura N

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 22:52

I would rather buy from a brick and mortar precisely because I can test the pen and nib before I buy it.  So I'd stick with the local store if I were you.  You may find the pen is too heavy, or you don't like the clip, or the EF is really too narrow for you.



#6 HDRoot

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 23:29

Richard is one of several extremely competent techs who can make a pen sing. I've had Mike Masuyama work magic on nibs that I thought were beyond help. I buy lots of used pens, so I expect that some of them will need a fine tuning. It's not right that new pens should require that kind of attention, but often they do, even among costly brands. For something special for which I'm willing to pay retail to make sure it's "right" and stays that way, I buy at Fahrney's. Not everybody is lucky enough to have a store like that in their neighborhood.



#7 JefferyS

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 23:35

I bought an EF Aurora from Richard, and it is extremely smooth. It is really worth it. I don't like a nib with any tooth, and he is my favorite nib-meister.
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#8 sbroda

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 23:37

I got the Binder treatment by purchasing a VP nib for a Decimo I had just purchased elsewhere.  I may sell the original nib.  Get the Binder treatment, you'll be glad you did.



#9 NobleDel

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 23:37

All the previous respondents make a good case for both trying out the pen first and getting a perfectly tuned nib. In my opinion your chances of getting a perfect nib right out of the box are less than 50-50.  In my case I purchased a pen based on my girlfriend's experience with hers. She purchased hers on line and it was super smooth. Wanting to get the same writing pen, I purchased an identical one for myself from the same dealer. It was horrible. It wrote like a ballpoint. Not smooth or wet as hers at all, and it was the same pen, same medium nib. I replaced the nib twice, and it still wrote poorly until it was tuned by Richard Binder at a pen show. My advice, once you decide on the pen you want, get it from someone who tunes it before selling to you, you wont be disappointed.

Edited by NobleDel, 22 August 2013 - 23:39.


#10 TimGirdler

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 23:44

As one who tunes nibs (full disclosure: I have been trained to do so by Richard), I can tell you there is a HUGE difference between an out-of-the-box pen and a tuned pen.

 

You won't be disappointed with a Binderized nib, and there will be no question whether it will be right or not.

 

As I've said before:  There is a reason nib guys who sell pens tune every pen that goes out of their shops. 

 

Blessings,

 

Tim

 

(Further Disclaimer:  I have no financial stake in Richardspens.com)


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#11 tonybelding

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 23:15

I think it's mostly a question of flow, as Binder adjusts nibs wetter than you usually get from the factory.  I like the result, but I wouldn't call it the night-and-day difference that some folks make it sound like.

 

When I got my New Postal Jr pen, the nib was a mess.  I sent it back, and Richard Binder fixed it and apologized for it not being right the first time.  So...  You can get a bad pen from anyone, but service is what ultimately matters.  You can rely on Binder to provide good service.

 

With regard to the VP...  In my experience, Pilot's quality control is among the best anywhere, and the VP nibs I've had were perfect just as they came from the factory.  (They're a bit "soft" for me, but that's merely a matter of taste.)



#12 seacritasianman

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 00:37

My binderized EEF Pelikan M800 nib writes smoother than the stock medium, and it's not that the medium had any problems with misalignment or anything either. He's just that amazing.


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#13 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 00:58

Don't have a pen from Richard, but have always heard good things. Last more expensive pen I bought, one of the pens I was considering was a Pelikan M200. Came thisclose to buying it from him versus another vendor who doesn't tune them. (Richard's price was actually slightly less.) I ended up getting something other than the Pelikan.


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#14 Johnson

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:51

Richard Binder is the man. Can't recommend him highly enough. After years of buying pens and ending up with disappointing nibs, I realize now it is a requirement for me to just buy one from a nibmeister like Richard. Pens not worth a darn if it doesn't write right, right?


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#15 Doug C

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 04:21

I have a few Binder nibs, but the find stub on my Onoto Heritage is the best stub I own.


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#16 michael_s

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 05:50

Keep in mind that switching nib units is an option on the Vanishing Point.  So at a later time you can buy a Binderized standard nib unit or one of Richard's specialty nibs.

 

-Mike



#17 Mafia Geek

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 07:54

I have bought several higher end Pilot nibs, largely from online retailers that don't adjust the nib, and haven't had any issues with the nibs at all. Even the Prera's with steel nibs were are very good. If you go into a B&M store you can try the pens until you find one that's good and go with that one if you like to support the local store. I really don't think it will take you long to find a good one, Pilot is VERY good with that. That way you can also confirm if the clip bothers you or not and pick the colour you like most in person.

 

As others have mentioned, if you fancy a finer nib at a later point you can get just the nib unit from Richard or Nibs.com with a custom grind on it, like an italic or xxxxxf.



#18 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:21

binder extra fines are awesome


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#19 rumbleroar

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 21:25

Hey guys, thanks for all of the advice, I'll definitely check out Binderized nibs sometime soon, but for now I got my VP from my local B&M store. It just didn't seem fair to me to go in, ask them to ink up a pen for me to test, and walk away empty handed only to buy it elsewhere.  It writes beautifully as is, but someday I'll probably get a Binderized XXF nib.  Thank you!



#20 welch

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 21:40

I have bought several higher end Pilot nibs, largely from online retailers that don't adjust the nib, and haven't had any issues with the nibs at all. Even the Prera's with steel nibs were are very good. If you go into a B&M store you can try the pens until you find one that's good and go with that one if you like to support the local store. I really don't think it will take you long to find a good one, Pilot is VERY good with that. That way you can also confirm if the clip bothers you or not and pick the colour you like most in person.

 

As others have mentioned, if you fancy a finer nib at a later point you can get just the nib unit from Richard or Nibs.com with a custom grind on it, like an italic or xxxxxf.

 

Richard and John Mottishaw are the only on-line pen-sellers that I would pick rather than my local store. They do wonderful work with nibs. 

 

However, have you tried a VP? I have one and it's a great idea but the clip drives me nuts. It's a weird feeling to steer a pen by nudging the upside-down clip. 

 

Oh, as others have mentioned, Richard's VP nib units are not so expensive. You can afford to buy the pen locally and get one of Richard's nibs if you really hate the standard nib. 


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