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Wality 77


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Catsmelt

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 15:28

1. First Impressions

I came across this pen while browsing isellpens. Dunno why I lurk there so often -- perhaps I don't like looking at things I've got no chance to own... I like hooded or semi-hooded pens, but don't own too many of them, and I enjoy the two Walitys I recently purchased (a 51 and a 52). The 77 seemed like a good thing based on my general Wality experience so I took the plunge. The experience with isellpens was nice and the package arrived promptly. The pen came with a velvet-like pouch and nothing more.

2. Appearance and Finish

The choices for a 77 at isellpens is blue or burgundy. I chose the burgundy. The body of the pen is a glossy plastic with no visible flaws. I'm impressed with the construction -- this is a piston filler and one really has to look close to see where the seam is at the end of the body where the twist mechanism is. The ink level can be observed through a band of small clear plastic triangles near the section.

The cap is very decorative; it is constructed of polished steel with a very elementary cloissone-type design that is obviously Indian-inspired. While the cap overall is nice, the clip assembly appears as uninspired as the cloissone is inspired -- reminescent of a Parker Jotter clip assembly. It looks quite durable if a bit industrial.

The semi-hooded nature of the nib comes about from a cut on the bias -- nothing curvilinear at all. As most hooded nibs remind me of the first-generation fighter jets, I'll call this one a "Sabre" cut.

3. Design/Size/Weight

The 77's body is made of plastic and a metal cap. Consequently, most of the weight is in the cap. The cap itself fits by pressure -- no snapping or screwing down. It's snug, but it also leaves marks on the body at both ends (if you also post the pen). The shape is fairly unique, but most closely resembles a Parker 45. The dimensions are:

- 5 1/4" capped
- 6" posted
- 4 7/8" unposted


The weight of the pen is very comfortable for me. I prefer to write unposted so this is a very light pen. Although the cap is metal, it is also comfortable posted.

4. Nib Design and Performance

If I'm surprized by anything with the 77, it is the nib. It is a relatively narrow nib that appears to be gold plated (or gold-ish plated). It writes somewhere between fine and extra-fine. Although that's a bit narrow for my tastes, the nib is very smooth and has a bit of flex that feels very nice while writing. The line is wet, smooth and consistent.

If you need to tweak the nib assembly, merely unscrew the section and carefully push the nib and feed out the back. The feed itself appears to be made of ebonite.

5. The filling system

The 77 is a piston filler. It operates smoothly and has a large capacity relative to the narrowness of the pen. While the capacity appears to be greater than the 51 or 52, I might be fooling myself because the other two pens have a wider girth. Regardless, the ink goes a long way.

To repeat something I mentioned in the Design section, the seam that separates the main body from the piston screw is nearly invisible -- at first glance this looks like a c/c filler. The only hint that this is a piston-filler are the small triangle view ports near the section.

6. Cost/Value

You'll take a $5.99 hit on the Wality 77 at isellpens. It's worth every penny and more.

7. Overall Opinion/Conclusion

I'd recommend the Wality 77 to anyone even thinking about buying it. I'd buy it again knowing what I know now, even with the fairly narrow nib width (it's a preference thing). I'd probably use this pen way more than I already do if the nib was a full Fine or thereabouts.

Try it, you'll like it.

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#2 Catsmelt

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 15:28

Cap Off

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#3 Catsmelt

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 15:29

Nib overview

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#4 Catsmelt

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 15:29

Close-up nib profile

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#5 southpaw

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 18:28

Thanks for an excellent review. It was great to see your obvious enthusiasm over your new pen. ENJOY!
"But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us." (Rom. 5:8, NKJV)

#6 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 18:53

Nice and interesting pen, thanks for the review.
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#7 Nibslayer

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 00:11

I generally agree, although mine has a slight gouge on the body (the plastic is quite soft). I would add that the cap does not seal very well, so I have issues letting it sit more than a day...with aircorp in it.

#8 Catsmelt

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 03:33

QUOTE(Nibslayer @ Feb 14 2007, 12:11 AM)
I generally agree, although mine has a slight gouge on the body (the plastic is quite soft). I would add that the cap does not seal very well, so I have issues letting it sit more than a day...with aircorp in it.

I tend to agree with you on both counts.

The cap does scratch the body up but I'm not too worried about it. If the pen were more expensive, then it would be a major issue with me.

Although the cap on my pen is similar and doesn't seal (it appears to be designed that way), I've never experienced a dry nib with any of the inks. Just to test, I pulled it out right now and it started immediately with Levenger's Gemstone Green -- it's been dormant for about three days.

If the cap's an issue with me, it's that the lack of an airtight seal detracts from the aesthetics.

#9 fermopagus

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 14:12

thanks for a great review! just ordered one of these on the 'bay, so i am super excited!
"Hell Verde Conquered."- Percival Harrison Fawcett






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