Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Esterbrook Nibs - What's The Difference Between Them All?


  • Please log in to reply
52 replies to this topic

#41 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,570 posts
  • Location:east of Atlanta, north of The Rock
  • Flag:

Posted 02 May 2019 - 13:32

2668 is a lowly nib, but one of the smoothest in my cache.


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


Sponsored Content

#42 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,570 posts
  • Location:east of Atlanta, north of The Rock
  • Flag:

Posted 02 May 2019 - 13:39

Thanks for the additional information.  I have a 1555 Gregg nib that seems pretty good (even with a folded over nib end, it wrote well with the ink in the pen that was reconstituted when I tried to flush the pen); and a 9128 in less than ideal condition (I've taken jewelry-making pliers to it in an attempt to straighten it out, and it wrote somewhat okay when I dip-tested it).  But I didn't know that the 9128 was also a type of nib for doing shorthand (even Esterbrook's own nib charts of which I've seen (don't mention it as such..)

Learn something new everu day.  :thumbup:

Ruth Morrisson aka instainedruth

 

I keep a desk pen on my computer desk fitted with a lowly 1555 Gregg because it always writes when I need to make a quick note, even if I haven't used it for several days. I read somewhere that it was designed so that a stenographer would not get stuck with a dry or skipping pen when rapidly taking notes.


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#43 SpecTP

SpecTP

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 938 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 May 2019 - 18:52

I paid $45 on ebay a few months ago for the 9128 nib.. it's a fantastic nib that is flexible with moderate pressure or lays down a consistent fine line if the pressure is light.



#44 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,570 posts
  • Location:east of Atlanta, north of The Rock
  • Flag:

Posted 02 May 2019 - 20:34

Can you post an example of how it writes?


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#45 SpecTP

SpecTP

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 938 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 03 May 2019 - 00:19

Can you post an example of how it writes?

Attached Images

  • IMG_0383 (3).jpg
  • IMG_0383_a.jpg


#46 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,570 posts
  • Location:east of Atlanta, north of The Rock
  • Flag:

Posted 04 May 2019 - 00:36

Thanks. This is one of the nibs I do not have, and may need to acquire.


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#47 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,458 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 04 May 2019 - 20:30

Thanks. This is one of the nibs I do not have, and may need to acquire.

 

You might want one of the 9128s.  They require enough effort to flex that they feel pretty strong, and I didn't feel there was a chance of damaging the nib.  It inspires confidence.  Not a wet noodle.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#48 corgicoupe

corgicoupe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,570 posts
  • Location:east of Atlanta, north of The Rock
  • Flag:

Posted 05 May 2019 - 00:10

Are you offering one, Paul?


Baptiste knew how to make a short job long

For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

                                                         Robert Frost


#49 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,458 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 07 May 2019 - 23:20

Are you offering one, Paul?

Do you want to borrow the 9128?  PM me is you want to borrow it. 

 

This is one of their nibs I find satisfying to use.  Usually with one of the M2s I put a Parker 51 pliglas sac in.  No sense being bothered with resacs if there is an antidote, unless you just like resacs.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#50 pitonyak

pitonyak

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 407 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 June 2019 - 19:20

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but is there any difference betrween the "manifold " nibs and the regular ones. I'm assuming they're stiffer nibs?  Does a "fine- firm" write differnetly than a fine-manifold"? I know the manifolds are for carbon paper.

 

If my memory serves me correctly, the purpose of a "manifold" nib was to handle forms with carbon paper; so you could press harder and leave a mark.



#51 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,458 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 09 June 2019 - 19:31

 

If my memory serves me correctly, the purpose of a "manifold" nib was to handle forms with carbon paper; so you could press harder and leave a mark.

Carbonless multipart forms too.  Does anybody do any of this any more? 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#52 BaronWulfraed

BaronWulfraed

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Lowell, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 09 June 2019 - 19:47

Carbonless multipart forms too.  Does anybody do any of this any more? 

Well, my checkbook has carbonless duplicate checks... Main reason it also has a Levenger roller-ball (with half the finish missing) that uses international standard cartridges. The only fountain I've ever considered using on it is a Sheaffer Intrigue -- the inlaid nib on that pen sort of noses downwards (no "ski jump" reverse curve) and feels firm enough for carbons.



#53 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,458 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 12 June 2019 - 23:54

Ah, yes, I forgot about carbonless checkbooks. 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .







Sponsored Content




|