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9461 " Weirdness", Wondering If I'm The Only One


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#1 OcalaFlGuy

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 15:43

Sometime ago I came upon a quantity of NOS 9461 nibs. Before I bid on them I did some checking. That is a Manifold nib, made to go through several layers of carbon paper. The shoulders also look stouter on them.  I figured both of those points would make it especially good for maybe newer less experienced (slightly hamfisted?) fountain pen users.

 

I've used 2 of them now, fresh out of the box. Unfortunately it's been a few months since the first so my memory is a bit rough with it.  :huh:

 

I'm sure with the 2nd and think so with the first that they are writing finer and drier than a usual Estie fine. That's my "weirdness".

 

<Shifting brain into gear :P  >

 

That makes sense, kind of.

 

It would seem if you were using a pen to write through 3 layers of carbon paper that you'd be pressing down harder than if just on 1 piece of paper. When you press down harder, the nib tips Have To spread apart some wider. If a Manifold nib were (tine) spaced as a normal nib would be, it seems it would likely be too wet, maybe even not flow at all when pressed down harder through 3 layers of paper. 

 

Soooo, yes, it makes sense (to me NOW)  that perhaps even brand new, when not used pressing down harder, a Manifold nib might not write as wetly or as wide as a non-Manifold nib fresh out of the box.

 

Thoughts, observations?

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl.-who yes, is getting nOOb nibmeister experience I wasn't aware I'd signed up for   :(



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#2 inkstainedruth

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 16:26

I keep looking at the various grades of manifold nibs -- I don't have any myself.  But thinking that it would write drier in order to make it through several carbon copies firmly without mucking up the top layer does make a certain amount of sense. 

I'd be interested in knowing/seeing the difference between the 1xxx, 2xxx and 9xxx grade nibs are, and also the difference between the F and M manifold nibs (and also seeing a comparison between them and say, the "regular" F/EF or M firm nibs -- and also between them and the Gregg Shorthand nibs).

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#3 pajaro

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 18:58

OcalaFLGuy:

"it seems it would likely be too wet, maybe even not flow at all when pressed down harder through 3 layers of paper."

========================================================================

 

I have used a few 9461 nibs and about 7 or 8 9460 medium manifold nibs.  I found them all to write a finer line than a usual fine or medium line, Estie or not.  Personally, I was pleased with these nibs.  I have come to prefer finer and drier.  Your explanation makes perfect sense. 


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#4 OcalaFlGuy

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 19:56

And then backchannel, El Zorno tells me all the 9461's he's seen were wet writers.

 

:huh:

 

It dawned on me later, the really stout looking shoulders. It could be that THOSE allow sufficient extra rigidity for the nib to be slited with a wider spacing. (Ie; the stouter shoulders may prevent the tine tips from spreading).

 

I'm still cornfused.  :rolleyes:

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl



#5 pajaro

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 19:09

They are what they are.  I have one 9460 medium that is so dry it looks like an extra fine.  These 9460 and 9461 nibs are probably the goofiest nibs Estie made, that I have tried, but they suit me to a T.  But then I am a old lunatic. 

 

I used to laugh at those opinionated old guys I met in my twenties.  The horror is that I am becoming one.  Just an aside.

 

The point is that these nibs are finer than their nominal size would indicate, and that you would have to press down on them to write through several carbons makes sense.  I bet a lot of you have never even seen a carbon set, but you might have seen a carbonless form in several copies. 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#6 Venemo

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:38

Yes, this is exactly my observation about the 9461 as well. I think this nib is indestructible, you would sooner break your pen than bend this nib. But sometimes I get the feeling that it does require some pressure to write as expected. Otherwise I suspect that these manifold nibs will be the ones that can survive the most use and abuse. The last surviving Esterbrook nib will be a 94xx :)



#7 gweimer1

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 16:12

The 9461 nib is my favorite. I just sold a pen to someone needing a nib just for writing on duplicate forms.

#8 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 00:39

I have a 9460 or 61 that isn't currently being used as I could never get ink to flow through it. (At all) On the other hand my 2464 (also a manifold-a B ] is wonderful writer.

Edited by Runnin_Ute, 01 January 2018 - 00:40.

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