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Cute Pens For Us Girls!

cute colourful pens girls females

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275 replies to this topic

#41 whitedot

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:01

I cannot find the insistence in this thread that pens cannot be designed for a gender. There were a few posts that suggested that pens can be genderless, which seems to be the vast majority of the market. To assume the default is masculine is a bit of a stretch, and those that try to appeal very directly to machismo like that Montegrappa Stallone monstrosity get very little appreciation around here. Most depend on relatively simple designs and "safe" color themes to avoid alienating segments of their possible customer base...it is not because the generic pen aesthetic is inherently masculine.

Is it simply a size issue? There are quite a lot of smaller FPs, and there used to be even more when they were actually made to be used in the mass market. They were often advertised in exactly the same sexist language this thread likes to use (let's just confiscate the mancard of any boy who likes a Chalana, shall we?).

There are many aesthetic niches that are poorly represented. I'd say "girly" pens (which I suspect is a gendered stereotype produced and enforced by male-driven systems) enjoy a better chunk of the market than do ones that pander to a flamboyantly "masculine" crowd.

 

Well said.



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#42 Montblanc owner and lover

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:18

as already said,montblanc princesse grace and for me the ST dupont liberté should do it nice too


A people can be great withouth a great pen but a people who love great pens is surely a great people too... Pens owned actually: MB 146 EF;Pelikan M200 SE Clear Demonstrator 2012 B;Parker 17 EF;Parker 51 EF;Waterman Expert II M,Waterman Hemisphere M;Waterman Carene F and Stub;Pilot Justus 95 F. Nearly owned: MB 149 B(Circa 2002);Conway Stewart Belliver LE bracket Brown IB.

#43 Namru

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:37

Screw all this nonsense. I'd dig any woman who used a PFM.

#44 Sasha Royale

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 13:04

Not all women are the same. (Says my wife.)  What does a woman want in her fountain pen ?

Petite ?  Functional ?  Formal ?  Whimsical ?  How about a pink Stipula Passaporto ? 

My wife prefers "ruggedly handsome".  (Vacumatic)


Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn. 
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen: 
Verweile doch, du bist so schön ! 


#45 Jadie

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 13:20

Many of the maki-e lacquers are quite feminine...I have a DaniTrio with wysteria and swallows and a Pilot Namiki of a Crane and Turtle.

 

 I agree~ The right maki-e designs definitely give pens a feminine appeal.

 

Design-wise though, I always thought the Monteverde Sleeping Beauty pen they did for Disney was quite lovely. It has my favorite colors/motifs (roses, gold, white) all in one shiny package. 

 

(Link to rollerball version, because it has nice pictures of the body): http://www.bidorbuy....erball_Pen.html

 

(Link to Chatterley Luxuries website desc): https://chatterleylu...uty-rollerball/


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#46 dorothynotgale

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 13:38

I don't like slim pens; they are uncomfortable for my hand. I don't like pale colors; they clash with everything I own and stain easily. This post seems to insinuate that there's one specific set of criteria for femininity in pens, and for "femininity" in taste in general.

 

I choose my pens to suit my preferences, and one of my favorites is a Noodlers Ahab in Carniolan Honey that looks nice with my wardrobe. This fat, amber-colored demonstrator pen does not fit the standards of a feminine pen as pitched here, but it works for me. (And yes, my wardrobe is very traditionally feminine, verging on performance; I deliberately cultivate a 1940 look with skirt and heels and hat and lipstick).
 

I cannot find the insistence in this thread that pens cannot be designed for a gender. There were a few posts that suggested that pens can be genderless, which seems to be the vast majority of the market. To assume the default is masculine is a bit of a stretch, and those that try to appeal very directly to machismo like that Montegrappa Stallone monstrosity get very little appreciation around here. Most depend on relatively simple designs and "safe" color themes to avoid alienating segments of their possible customer base...it is not because the generic pen aesthetic is inherently masculine.

Is it simply a size issue? There are quite a lot of smaller FPs, and there used to be even more when they were actually made to be used in the mass market. They were often advertised in exactly the same sexist language this thread likes to use (let's just confiscate the mancard of any boy who likes a Chalana, shall we?).

There are many aesthetic niches that are poorly represented. I'd say "girly" pens (which I suspect is a gendered stereotype produced and enforced by male-driven systems) enjoy a better chunk of the market than do ones that pander to a flamboyantly "masculine" crowd.

 

This was well said. Unless an object is specified to be for one gender or the other, I think it is unisex. (And if something is being marketed for only one or the other, it would help if people were to examine the reasoning behind and implications of that marketing decision.)



#47 Anne S. Gray

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:06

We've had discussions whether a woman can use blue ink, whether a man can use pink ink. 

 

But most pens are not really girl-friendly. :(

 

Pens are equally used by both men and women, but it seems that the pens I see are mostly geared toward men in design. Colours are sombre, rather robust and bulky in design, without much fanciful decorations. You do get an occasional one like Marlene Dietrich, but those are very rare (there are pink Pelikanos and such, but I don't think corporate women would want to be seen with those...).

 

So ladies! What is your "pen design" wish? Something thinner, or with filigreed barrel, or more colours? I personally want a thinner pen in brighter colours (yes, yes, I know there are Safaris, but the design of the pen isn't really... nice). Maybe a fleur-de-lis on the clip. 

 

I'm not sure what you mean by girl friendly. i really like fountain pens that have some heft and are able to hold a nice amount of ink..


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#48 RuiFromUK

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:19

Hi Gabrielle, Why don't you get someone to make your one personal fountain pen? There are at least a couple of UK websites who will create a pen with your own specifications. For example http://www.handmadefountainpens.co.uk/ can create fountain pens to meet your personal specifications within reason. If you check their "Sold Pen Gallery" you can see what Johna has already made for other clients, e.g. a pen with a printed circuit board design, etc. At the moment I am actually waiting for them for a pen with very simple specifications: a simple copper sky fountain pen but with a titanium fine nib rather than steel or gold due to its extra flexibility. I am sure can create you a lovely from his standard pens in stock but more appropriate for you. Keep us posted. Kind regards, Rui

Kind regards,

 

Rui


#49 Mesu

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:21

I always thought the beautiful Princess Grace pen is the epitome of feminine class.
 
fpn_1371707504__montblanc_princesse_grac
 
REALLY want one!


Exactly my kind of pen. Great design with a splash of colour without overdoing it.

#50 flyingfox

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:40

Waterman Audace seemed like the "ultimate girls' pen"- comes in many cute colors and designs, nicely curbed,and comes with a pen case that is shaped like a lipstick case.  I only have the pink one, but am totally coveting the other ones. 

I also have a few cute vintage ones by Pilot that I have to take pics of...

For me, color variation is the key.  After all, that's the number one reason why I love fountain pens so much- to be able to write in inks of all shades of not just gray but also whatever the colors you can possibly imagine multiplied by tons.

Waterman Audace.jpg



#51 jetsam

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:41

What about giving a pen as a gift to a girl/woman. Do you choose a "feminine" one?
Have you (women) also ever received pens as gifts which were noticeably gender oriented, or have you (men) been uncomfortable with the gift pens you have received?

#52 dorothynotgale

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:45

Waterman Audace seemed like the "ultimate girls' pen"- comes in many cute colors and designs, nicely curbed,and comes with a pen case that is shaped like a lipstick case.  I only have the pink one, but am totally coveting the other ones. 

I also have a few cute vintage ones by Pilot that I have to take pics of...

For me, color variation is the key.  After all, that's the number one reason why I love fountain pens so much- to be able to write in inks of all shades of not just gray but also whatever the colors you can possibly imagine multiplied by tons.

attachicon.gifWaterman Audace.jpg

Those are really cool! I love variety. (As a totally random aside, something about the angles of the pens in that photo is creating a weird, dizzying optical illusion that makes everything else look tilted.)



#53 Seele

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 14:53

Spot the difference:

 

03f18483abed677bcd91988b72972766.jpg

 

T2DXeOXaRaXXXXXXXX_!!89733367.jpg


No, I am not going to list my pens here.

#54 pen2paper

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:10

There have been some historic attempts at the ladies pen, the CS Dinkie may be one, the Curzon Summit Joy pens of the 20's / 30's another (see here: http://summit.ch944.net/section3.php ), and the Rosemary ' thats for remembrance' pens of the same era. These would still fit the requirements of the OP

 

More recently, I have seen some Jean Pierre Lepine pens that look like classy purse pens for the younger lady.

 

OOps I did this wrong, here is my comment after the quote:

 

1st, brief OT, thank you for the link, northlodge and invite to your study site.  Very much appreciate the care with which you laid out the history, and provided the examples for pen enthusiasts to study. Long have I felt vintage English manufacture should have more presence in study here at FPN. I hope you, with your fine site, will be the seed to open such discussion here. Thanks! (the site navigates easily too, really really well done!).

 

At this site, as well as others with brand specific focus, we do see that manufacturers have generally provided for the "smaller hand". Some with a more feminine appearance. Historical advertising ephemera supports the marketing of some pen products to the feminine side of the era represented. 

 

http://jonathandonah...aystewart.info/

 

http://parkerpens.net/pastel.html

 

Today, humans are generally of larger stature than our forefathers. I once was of average height and frame at 5'4ish, Now when I visit a middle school, I'm surrounded by pre-teens that approach 6 feet. with much larger frames. Shoes for my narrow foot and small hand are not easy to come by in these modern days.

 

To enjoy some very fine examples from pen history, those with a smaller hand may enjoy looking for vintage pens represented in these smaller sizes.  As you can see, I favor fitting one's hand for comfort, size And weight, for a positive writing experience.  Generally, once beyond the dip era, and once fountain pens were well-established, most manufacturers captured their market with a full range of sizes. For those with a smaller hand, this can be a slight advantage as the largest size fountain pens have the most presence among collectors.

 

In modern pens discussed, Platinum Plaisir was not yet mentioned. It comes in light, bright, and glossy black. A very good pen with reliable ink flow, and really nice nib. Lamy Safari reliability with dressier appearance.

 

northlodge, you have a rosemary! one of the pens on my "list". just looking for the pen however. Please do share more about your site with Us!  We really need an ongoing Vintage English made thread  (hint).


Edited by pen2paper, 20 June 2013 - 15:20.


emoticon-animal-007.gif~Hi! fountain pen enthusiast here~


#55 flyingfox

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:39

OMG I LOVE the "Lady Pilot" pen!  (Sorry, couldn't figure out how to quote only THAT pic, and not the entire post.)

Here's the round up of all my girly pens...  Some could be argued as gender-neutral, but anyhow.

girly pens capped.JPG

girly pens.JPG

The details are amazing for some pens, the cute little heart-shaped breather hole on Sailor pen.  Platinum 3776 have those as well, and I just love that.

sailor nib.JPG

Incidentally, sorry, I lied on the earlier post.  The pen holder that looks like a lipstick case came with ici et la, also by waterman.  Audace came with a little bag. 

cases.JPG

 

 



#56 hardyb

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:39

I can think of a source of inspiration for design and color: The Suffragette Movement

http://www.google.co...vYHwDA&imgdii=_

Edited by hardyb, 20 June 2013 - 16:23.

The Danitrio Fellowship

#57 flyingfox

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:42

Those are really cool! I love variety. (As a totally random aside, something about the angles of the pens in that photo is creating a weird, dizzying optical illusion that makes everything else look tilted.)

 

LOL true, especially the black rectangle around it totally looks weird.  :wacko:

 

 

"Have you (women) also ever received pens as gifts which were noticeably gender oriented..."

(Sorry- haven't figured out how to do the multiquote in the new system either...  :( )

 

Pens or not, whatever the gift item maybe, I always LOVE feminine design.  Colors, patterns, design- the girlier the better.  Then again, I have always been a girly- girl to the max.  Obviously YMMV big time, as personal taste is a personal thing by definition.

 


Edited by flyingfox, 20 June 2013 - 15:53.


#58 Uncle Red

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:49

Gabrielle, I know what you mean. When I was looking for a fountain pen for my mother a while ago I had trouble finding one that was the right size (she's 5'0") and good looking enough. Mom is know for dressing in lots of color and flair ( the old school meaning, not buttons); a black pen with gold trim would not do.

 

I went with the Edison Nouveau Premiere in Cappuccino. It's slender with great color.

 

My Niece is turning 14 in July (OMG 14!) and since she likes the Hero 616 I gave her she's getting a Parker 51 set in black with gold filled caps. She's a kind of colorful goth, purple skulls and all.

 

BTW, I'm a big gay man and I like little ringtops.



#59 saskia_madding

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 16:43

The reason there are men's vs. women's (fill in whatever blank you wish to here - pens, watches, skin care products, etc) is because we are currently functioning in a system that sets up men and women as vastly different and needing vastly different things.  OF COURSE that helps the people who sell products, because it means they can sell many more types of products at different price points.  Saying, "well it happens in other areas, so it must be okay/just the way it is" does not jive with me.  Maybe we DO have men's vs. women's stuff, but we shouldn't.

 

I don't believe in this binary system, where female = feminine.  There is a HUGE difference between those two things - the former being a gender, the latter being traits we humans have decided to associate with a specific gender.  For example, muscles are coded as being male, and female body builders are often made fun of and denigrated as not being feminine enough.  But females also have muscles, don't they?  Why is something that both men and women have on a biological level coded as strictly masculine?

 

The same is true for fountain pens.  Not all women like slender pens.  Not all men like huge, honking oversize pens.  Not all women like pink pens, not all men like blue or black ones.  

 

As a general rule, "not all X like Y" is a pretty safe statement.

 

So, if the OP rephrased the question to be "I personally prefer pink, slender pens because I like the colour pink and my hands are small" (as one example of potential reasons for the preference), then people would more easily know what pent o suggest for you.  But just saying "girly pen" evokes a slightly different idea from everyone, and the suggestions won't be as targeted.  And as a side benefit, it wouldn't support the damaging, status quo, gender binary.



#60 kronos77

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 16:46

I always thought the beautiful Princess Grace pen is the epitome of feminine class.

 

fpn_1371707504__montblanc_princesse_grac

 

REALLY want one!

I understand designing pens differently for the two sexes, but what I don't get is why many of the so-called ladies pens are classified so.  Usually they are sleek, curvy and sexy, just like a beautiful woman.  What red blooded man wouldn't want to get his hands around that Princess Grace pen?  I'd rather hold a curvy, female shaped pen than the boring pens for men.







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