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Best Choice For A Signature

signature signing best fountain pen nib stub choice suggestion beautiful sign

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48 replies to this topic

#21 ningishzida

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 19:42

I love stubs for signatures.  My favorite "signature pen" is a gold-plated Sheaffer Targa that came with an oblique stub.  However... The point is too wide for comfort with my ordinary everyday scribbling, which means I wouldn't use it for much else besides signatures.  I did get a leather carry case with two pouches, so I could carry the gold Targa with the stub nib in one slot and a silver Targa with a F nib in the other.  That makes a pretty neat combination.

 

I also have a Bexley Corona with a B nib that was custom-ground to a 0.9mm stub.  That's a good compromise, as it's wide enough to make a fairly bold signature, but fine enough to feel comfortable with my everyday handwriting too.  That's worked well as a one-pen solution.

Thanks, is oblique nib suitable for oval or sharp signatures?



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#22 ningishzida

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 19:45

^^^ That there. What HE said.  :thumbup: 

 

Were I to pick one of mine for a signature I'd be one of my Binder CI Imperials or a Masuyama Sharp Stub P-51.

 

A nice wet line with eye catching line variation.

 

Bruce in Ocala, FL

Thank you for your answer, but finally I think I should research more about nibs because I can't understand the your advices fully  :blush:



#23 ningishzida

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 19:51

I prefer stubs or customized cursive italics for signature.  It has been my experience that the best stock nib for signature are the stubs that came on Sheaffer's Targa, Imperial and lately the Legacy. 

Thanks a lot. I think I should study more about nibs  :thumbup:



#24 At Midnight

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 00:53

It needs to be at least a stub for some line variation, and a bit dry because you may need to sign on poor paper and you dont want it to bleed.

 

The nib must be broadish



#25 kernando

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:56

Choose a fountain pen.


stolen 8/14/16 SF south of Market https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Gf24EwNiEy6nfKoep2Gnw8EVFthfPngtNSuSgIrAWRk/edit?usp=sharing

#26 elysee

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 08:03

A broad, stub, italic, or a somewhat wide medium nib works nicely, producing a bold signature; I have all of these and they are a joy with which to write, making writing one's signature a pleasure and a work of art. In addition, a bold blue (or other color ink, just not black) is best so that those receiving your letter can tell that a word-processed letter is an original rather than a photocopy.

#27 carlos.q

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:16

May I offer a different perspective? I find that a vintage Pelikan semi-flex KF or KM nib works very well as a signature nib. The ball pointed Kugel tip is great for fast signing and the semi-flex nib offers nice line variation depending on the pressure.

The downside? These nibs are not easy to find.

#28 Sandy1

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 15:29

Hi,

 

I use two signatures: One that is 'my mark' for stuff that may end-up in the public domain (e.g. package receipts, credit card chits, administrivia), the other is for more private 'legal' documents, such as contracts.

 

For the legal stuff, I prefer a stub nib combined with a shading ink. It stands-out by virtue of colour, and variation in line shape and value.

 

Stubs of 0.7 - 0.9mm match my rather large natural hand.

 

If a person is signing the odd bit of bumph that comes across one's desk, I reckon a Pilot Plumix is fit for purpose. (The cap has a very tight seal, so will most often start quickly. To enhance that seal, a film of silicon grease may be added to the cap lip.)

If there are Witnesses, I'll reach for a more upscale pen, but that's just me. And I've learned how to politely decline a proffered pen.

 

Bye,

S1


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#29 Eugen-of-Savoy

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 13:29

When you go for the fountain pen, it also depends on the fact of having blotting paper in reach of hand. The broader the autograph, the higher amount of ink used en the longer the period to dry.
It would be a shame to ruin the autograph with smudges.

#30 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:04

It needs to be at least a stub for some line variation, and a bit dry because you may need to sign on poor paper and you dont want it to bleed.

 

The nib must be broadish

Than you for your answer. Could you explain that what is the 'bleed' ? 



#31 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:05

Choose a fountain pen.

Have you got a suggestion for brand and nib?



#32 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:11

A broad, stub, italic, or a somewhat wide medium nib works nicely, producing a bold signature; I have all of these and they are a joy with which to write, making writing one's signature a pleasure and a work of art. In addition, a bold blue (or other color ink, just not black) is best so that those receiving your letter can tell that a word-processed letter is an original rather than a photocopy.

I am agree with you  :thumbup: Thanks for your advice.



#33 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:16

May I offer a different perspective? I find that a vintage Pelikan semi-flex KF or KM nib works very well as a signature nib. The ball pointed Kugel tip is great for fast signing and the semi-flex nib offers nice line variation depending on the pressure.

The downside? These nibs are not easy to find.

I will investigate them. Thanks for your advice.



#34 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:39

Hi,

 

I use two signatures: One that is 'my mark' for stuff that may end-up in the public domain (e.g. package receipts, credit card chits, administrivia), the other is for more private 'legal' documents, such as contracts.

 

For the legal stuff, I prefer a stub nib combined with a shading ink. It stands-out by virtue of colour, and variation in line shape and value.

 

Stubs of 0.7 - 0.9mm match my rather large natural hand.

 

If a person is signing the odd bit of bumph that comes across one's desk, I reckon a Pilot Plumix is fit for purpose. (The cap has a very tight seal, so will most often start quickly. To enhance that seal, a film of silicon grease may be added to the cap lip.)

If there are Witnesses, I'll reach for a more upscale pen, but that's just me. And I've learned how to politely decline a proffered pen.

 

Bye,

S1

Thank you for your answer and I think you are sadist  :yikes:



#35 ningishzida

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 15:46

When you go for the fountain pen, it also depends on the fact of having blotting paper in reach of hand. The broader the autograph, the higher amount of ink used en the longer the period to dry.
It would be a shame to ruin the autograph with smudges.

So should I use fine or medium nib? or should I use another pen except fountain pen?



#36 Sandy1

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 16:31

Thank you for your answer and I think you are sadist  :yikes:

 

Hi,

 

You're welcome!

 

A Plumix is a low cost pen that has an easy-writing Stub nib.

 

For ink, I most often choose MB Midnight Blue, but R&K Salix would be another fine choice. Both are iron-gall inks, so are quite robust and enduring, and their appearance is quite unique with high shading potential.

 

Enjoy!

 

Bye,

S1


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#37 RMN

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 19:51

 

Hi,

 

You're welcome!

 

A Plumix is a low cost pen that has an easy-writing Stub nib.

 

For ink, I most often choose MB Midnight Blue, but R&K Salix would be another fine choice. Both are iron-gall inks, so are quite robust and enduring, and their appearance is quite unique with high shading potential.

 

Enjoy!

 

Bye,

S1

I thought I read the new MB blue/black, or midnight blue was not an iron gall ink any more?

Or am I mistaken?

 

D.ick


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Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

 

 

~

 


#38 soum

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 19:58

The new MB Midnight Blue is iron gall. Only Lamy Blue Black has stopped being an iron gall ink after reformulation.

BTW, the MB Midnight Blue is my signature ink as well.

#39 ningishzida

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:46

 

Hi,

 

You're welcome!

 

A Plumix is a low cost pen that has an easy-writing Stub nib.

 

For ink, I most often choose MB Midnight Blue, but R&K Salix would be another fine choice. Both are iron-gall inks, so are quite robust and enduring, and their appearance is quite unique with high shading potential.

 

Enjoy!

 

Bye,

S1

I will investigate Pilot Plumix, thanks for your advice.



#40 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 19:54

Thanks for finally clarifying a signature pen to me.

It is to appear strong when you are not.

 

For fancy, I can see a medium to broad stub or a semi-flex or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex in any width.

I do have semi-flex KM's that would do the big and bold trick and still be readable.

 

Philosophically, who would you rather work for a 'Big Bold Scrawl' or "fancy line variation' or simple clear M or ball point user?

 

Would a big bold scrawl chum the water for the knowledgeable predator?   :ninja:

 

For legal, I use a M or F for a clear hard to counterfeit signature.I could and have used semi-flex for a slightly wetter line.

 

I can see using a vintage oblique with semi-flex or 'flexi' if I used that pen all the time for that.

That way I could tell at a glance, did I write it or not?


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 29 June 2013 - 20:22.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






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