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Porsche Design 3135 "solid" Titanium Pen


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#1 ParkerBeta

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 00:13

Anybody know more about this pen? The only mention I see is on this
online penstore's site Even the Porsche design website doesn't mention it, but according to the online seller's website, it is supposed to be introduced this month.


Seems to be priced comparable to the Nakaya Piccolo Titanium, but a more radical design. Wonder how practical it'll be, though: the pen comes inside an aluminum sleeve, and you'll need another case for that sleeve, I think.
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#2 Sallent

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 00:21

$1,200 USD? Wow, expensive even if it is titanium. I bet it's quite heavy and unbalanced, but the people that buy Porsche pens usually buy them as bling signature pens, and it looks blingy enough that they will love them. I'm sure they'll sell out of them quick.

I can see it now, my client getting out of his Porsche wearing a Porsche jacket, a Porsche hat, and Porsche cologne. He walks into my office and opens up his Porsche bag and pulls out his Porsche tobacco pipe and asks if he can light up in my office, then after lighting up he pulls out his Porsche fountain pen to sign the contract to retain me as his attorney, all the while trying to see whether I am impressed by what must be a huge bank account, as evidenced by the overabundance of Porsche gear he has on him. :sick:
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#3 Pennata Penna

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:40

more radical design


Nice flashback to Parker T1 from the 70s but capless, interesting. The Nakaya is stunning as always. :puddle: head to head with OMAS T2 I reckon.

Lovely pens!

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#4 msnovtue

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:03

$1,200 USD? Wow, expensive even if it is titanium. I bet it's quite heavy and unbalanced, but the people that buy Porsche pens usually buy them as bling signature pens, and it looks blingy enough that they will love them. I'm sure they'll sell out of them quick.

I can see it now, my client getting out of his Porsche wearing a Porsche jacket, a Porsche hat, and Porsche cologne. He walks into my office and opens up his Porsche bag and pulls out his Porsche tobacco pipe and asks if he can light up in my office, then after lighting up he pulls out his Porsche fountain pen to sign the contract to retain me as his attorney, all the while trying to see whether I am impressed by what must be a huge bank account, as evidenced by the overabundance of Porsche gear he has on him. :sick:



Um, no, they don't. For one thing, Porsche Design is an independent company from Porsche AG, the carmaker. It was founded by F.A. Porsche, son of company founder Ferry Porsche. For another, these are indeed "farmed out" to be built--previously by Faber-Castell and currently by Pelikan.

I have one of the FC TecFlex pens, and it's fantastic. It is heavy, but very well balanced, and is even designed so you can post the cap without it ever touching the main body of the pen--a briliant bit of designwork. It is a c/c, but so are quite a few good pens. The nib is as good as any of my Pelikans, and it is and has remained one of my favorite pens.

Finally, I'm sick of people bashing Porsche. Yeah, there are jerks out there like you mention. And if they keep the car for more than a few years, I'm shocked.

There are a lot more people out there like me--I don't have mine yet, but I'm working on it. These cars are masterworks of engineering. Name me another car that has been consistently produced for over 50 years with only technological updates.

I don't want a Porsche for status. I couldn't care less about that. I want one because they are amazing engineering feats that are a fantastic and unique driving experience and durable as hell--as of a few years ago, over 70% of all Porsche cars ever built are still on the road.

But I come by my love honestly. My parents had a pair of 356s, and at least one of them is still around & drivable.

Oh, and the Porsche I'm wanting? 1980-87 911 targa. People don't drive 25 to thirty yeats old cars for "status" and bling. Too much work. (Blowing the minds of teenagers in "tuner" cars? Okay, yeah, I'll give you that one. But it's just so much fun to watch their heads explode. I already have quite a bit of fun in my ancient M-B I inherited from my Dad.) :roflmho:

Sorry, but I get very tired of poeple bashing something I love and have loved since I was a kid. The 356s my parents had? Nobody knew what a Porsche was back then--they were usually mistaken for VW Kharmann Ghias. But dang, did they have Fun.

Oh, woops... this is supposed to be about pens, isn't it? :headsmack: :embarrassed_smile:

Edited by msnovtue, 18 March 2013 - 10:10.

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#5 sirksael

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:07

As far as I know, Porsche design pens are manufatured by Pelikan, unless this has changed in the mean time? They will at least be high quality then...
I'm sure some people like them for what they are, not to show off.
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#6 Frits B

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 11:25

As far as I know, Porsche design pens are manufatured by Pelikan, unless this has changed in the mean time? They will at least be high quality then...
I'm sure some people like them for what they are, not to show off.

Only the Pure is made by Pelikan. The TecFlex series used to be made by Faber-Castell and I doubt that FC would transfer production to the competition. FC also made the P 3150, a bullet (or cigar) shaped steel pen with two patches of black or brown leather on the cap. A good pen with a nicely long section, far better to hold than the TecFlex, but I don't see it advertised anymore. As for the new pen, my opinion is that it is overly complicated. On the other hand, who leaves home with an urushi pen without having at least a protective sleeve at hand?

#7 sirksael

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 16:26

Ah, thanks for correcting me!
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#8 UK Mike

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 22:03

I have to rock the boat here maybe, but I think it looks horrible and impractical.

Perhaps I am just too traditional, but I really don't admire the design of this nor the concept.
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#9 Huntsman

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 22:39

Having the outer case is unduly fussy. I would like the look of it sans branding, the name constantly up would eventually have me asking why they felt the need to constantly remind me who made the pen. It's not that forgettable.

Edited by Huntsman, 18 March 2013 - 22:40.


#10 wspohn

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 03:50

I bet it's quite heavy and unbalanced,



You might lose your bet - titanium is quite light.

In any case the style doesn't appeal to me.
Bill Spohn
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#11 msnovtue

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 09:40

Only the Pure is made by Pelikan. The TecFlex series used to be made by Faber-Castell and I doubt that FC would transfer production to the competition. FC also made the P 3150, a bullet (or cigar) shaped steel pen with two patches of black or brown leather on the cap. A good pen with a nicely long section, far better to hold than the TecFlex, but I don't see it advertised anymore. As for the new pen, my opinion is that it is overly complicated. On the other hand, who leaves home with an urushi pen without having at least a protective sleeve at hand?



Just fyi, that seems not to be the case, actually... I just picked up one of the all-black Tecflexes on e(vil)Bay, and was cleaning it a bit before inking it up. Happened to look at the converter, and where my Pd/gold Tecflec says Faber-Castell, this one read "Pelikan".

As a side note to anyone thinking about picking up and older PD pen, I have hear rumors to the fact that neither Pelikan (because they didn't make it) nor FC (because they no longer make them & have no contract with PD to do so) will service the pens. :glare:

Bad call on the part of Porsche Design, if you ask me. That said, I've had my (Pd/Au) Tecflex for over a year, have not always treated it kindly, and the thing seems to be nigh indestructible. :blink:
(It's also highly likely I just jinxed myself.)
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#12 Frits B

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 11:38

Just fyi, that seems not to be the case, actually... I just picked up one of the all-black Tecflexes on e(vil)Bay, and was cleaning it a bit before inking it up. Happened to look at the converter, and where my Pd/gold Tecflec says Faber-Castell, this one read "Pelikan".

OK, but the question is then: was the converter original and as supplied by the manufacturer? eBay, you know ... On the other hand, they are still offered new so apparently Pelikan stepped in. Makes you wonder: who made/makes the barrel and section?

My TecFlex has a converter marked Faber-Castell.

#13 adamselene

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 11:56

The cone at the business end of my tech-flex roller came of with the cap, the lovely braid ubbraieded, and Chatrtpak enforces the two year warranty, cost is slightly less than used street price.

I used yo think these were very sturdy.

Can you imagine all those threads coming apart, all bent and twister? Too horrible to photograph!

#14 ele

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 13:54

I'm suprised no one else is wondering about this retractable thing...it is pictured with a case, and it doesn't look like there is anywhere to twist the pen to move the nib in and out, so is the case really what it has to be stored iN?????

#15 Frits B

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 14:25

I'm suprised no one else is wondering about this retractable thing...it is pictured with a case, and it doesn't look like there is anywhere to twist the pen to move the nib in and out, so is the case really what it has to be stored iN?????

It's not retractable. The Dutch text says there is a button on the tail end of the pen. When you press this button and turn the blind cap, the internal mechanism, i.e. nib, feed and converter, slide out of the barrel in order to fill the converter. The nib always stays out. The aluminum tube is just a case; it should prevent damage to the nib and keep it wet. Not overly practical, IMHO.

#16 ele

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 14:29

I'm suprised no one else is wondering about this retractable thing...it is pictured with a case, and it doesn't look like there is anywhere to twist the pen to move the nib in and out, so is the case really what it has to be stored iN?????

It's not retractable. The Dutch text says there is a button on the tail end of the pen. When you press this button and turn the blind cap, the internal mechanism, i.e. nib, feed and converter, slide out of the barrel in order to fill the converter. The nib always stays out. The aluminum tube is just a case; it should prevent damage to the nib and keep it wet. Not overly practical, IMHO.

so the pen doesn't have a cap? how wierd...

#17 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 15:00

Germany is the only place left for fast cars, and you now because of the Greens really have to drive far out of your way to find an Autobahn where you can really fly low any more.

Porsche, my wife Mrs. Leadfoot would like one, or the new 8 cylinder Audi.She changed her mind after a few decades to wanting a fast car.
We should still be able to find a portion of a distant autobahn to use it when not in the mountains seven miles away.

I was watching a German TV program, where they have Porsche tours. You fly in to Frankfurt and you tour parts of Germany...Black Forest, some Alps and so on, in a caravan of Porsche's. Every once in a while the tour guide takes one where one can use the Porsche a bit.
For folks that are not use to flying low on the Autobahn.
At €1,000 a day with Hotel. There was an older American woman so very happy to drive 100 mph on a back road and 150-60 mph on the Autobahn for short stretches.....it was a bit over the speed limit...but they can afford the fines.

Personally, I'd have to take a course because Porsche will break loose on you at high speed cornering if you lack experience. (or did ... I don't know how much electrical road junk has been added to the car.)
And I'd lack experience at that speed.
An Austin Martin supposedly gives you advanced warning you are going too fast by wiggling the ass end.

I do drift my six gear Masada MX-5 from time to time (one of the reasons why I bought it (years ago), it did not have electrical snick snack out side of ABS.). I bought it so I could drive 20-25 Kph faster than German speed limits in the mountains, which are much higher than in American.
Starting seven miles away I have mountains, with 70-90-120-160+ degree turns. 70 Kmh/45 Mph is normal speed limit for that; you are always going to have a local with his VW Golf on your tail. Even the old fogies do at least the speed limit.

I was so surprised that 70 degree corners in the US on the hilly back roads had a 25 MPH limit.

I bought my MX-5 as a touring car, otherwise I could have bought a Lotus for the same money if I just wanted to have fun driving up and down mountains only....I did want a seat thicker than two inches. :blink:
The MX-5 (has some funny name in the States like the Moth that did not eat Tokyo) is not an Autobahn car. It only does about 125 mph so I cruise at 115 mph- Mrs Leadfoot at 120mph.
I have to watch in the rear mirror to get out of the way from fast VW's, Opel's, Audi's and so on.

You can get a ticket for going the speed limit in the passing lane...pass and get out of the way. We don';t have a fast and a slow lane, we have a passing lane and a get passed lane.


I can't see any use of a Porsche or other high end car out side of Germany. Perhaps the Italian cops let the Lamborghini drivers get away with going fast on the Autostrata, but I don't think that includes German cars. :P

I can see a high speed low end car in America to get into traffic on the Interstate in the US. Well a Porsche has enough get up and go to do that...automatic in a Porsche :headsmack: . Well, corners are few and far apart, traffic jams everywhere. So automatics are the way to go in traffic jam driving. We are getting traffic jams here too. :crybaby:

I am always so happy to get back to the safe and sane Autobahns after I get back from the wild Interstates in the States.

Signs are not very good in the US any more either. Once they were the greatest in the world...they have gone down hill.

Faber Castell used Porsche break lines for one of it's pens a few years ago.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 24 March 2013 - 15:03.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#18 RMN

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 00:59

Some of the design of this mr Porsche are really special, IMHO. I think they are on a same level as Alessi.


There are a few series of pens he designed. The older ones, as already mentioned, were outsourced to GvFC.
A recent series was indeed made by Pelikan.
I own a tec-flex. It had a GvFC converter.
I own a (made by Pelikan) pencil. Superb balance. But the propelling system inside is: Faber Castell.
And these converters, either FC or Pelikan, are all Schmidt converters.

Outsourcing of production is not uncommon (part or total):
The older Dunhill pens were made by Pilot/Namiki. The newer ones by Montblanc.
The (gold) nibs of the Cross Verve were made by Pilot.
Harley Davidson pens were made by several companies, among them Waterman.

The P3135 may remind of the Parker T1, but it is NOT a one piece pen. The body is titanium, the nib is gold.

I am sure the balance will be superb. One can argue if a pen without cap, but with a carrying tube is practical. If, like I do, you conduct an interview and make notes on that your pen will lay idle a lot. I have to cap mine frequently, so I think this pen will not be practical for me, but if you write long stretches or just a few words incidentally it might do the trick. I find the price outside my comfort zone, though.

Don't go by the makers websites. These are often hopelessly outdated. I am sure this pen will appear after a while.


D.ick

Edited by RMN, 25 March 2013 - 01:01.

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#19 Ipsilon

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 13:13

Anybody has an idea of the size of this pen?

I just can't find it on any web site...

 

Thanks!

 

Y


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#20 genls

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 00:49

Saw the pen in person.  Quite a long pen - somewhere between a #2 pencil and a Parker Jotter (not sure if those comparisons help).  Very nice build quality - it's perfectly machined, as would be expected of Porsche.  It is not particularly heavy despite it's length, probably because of the use of titanium.

 

This pen is quite unique - nothing else like it on the market right now.  The lack of a cap and use of a container for the pen is very unique.  The converter is accessed in a very unique way.  The inlaid nib is rather unique as well.  This pen is definitely a conversation starter.

 

Having said all that, I think this is nothing more than a toy pen, for those who have everything in the world and need something else to buy.  Unless your job involves long periods of writing (alternating with long periods of not-writing), I just can't see this pen as being practical.  To uncap and take it out requires considerably more effort than using a regular fountain pen.  To leave the pen out would mean dry-out.  The pen is also too big for a pocket when it's in its container, and so is not very practical to carry.

 

Just my own opinion (don't mean to offend).  I would love to have this pen, but would have trouble putting it into rotation for the reasons above.








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