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Wahl-Eversharp Skyliner 50


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127 replies to this topic

#21 ethernautrix

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 19:59

I watched this video yesterday. So you're the vixen! (I think I clicked on a link from fpgeeks.com.)

I like the green one, and I want to try it. The nib looks like it might be similar to the Falcon "semi-flex." Or "soft." Or maybe the Pilot soft F/M.

And the green color is Japanese to me. I had plastic items (a cute little radio, for instance) when I was a kid -- things made in Japan -- of a similar color, so it appeals to me.

Hm... I have Waterman cartridges.... :-D

And a syringe.

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#22 WillSW

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 21:07

So does it take Waterman carts or standard international?

Waterman
Syd


Aren't Waterman cartridges international?

#23 Sallent

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 21:41

So does it take Waterman carts or standard international?

Waterman
Syd


Aren't Waterman cartridges international?


I believe Waterman cartridges are longer...other than that I think there is no real difference.
Ball-point pens are only good for filling out forms on a plane.

#24 hot cocoa

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 03:30

Honestly, the pens that seem to get the most coverage are the ones that the most people can have some reasonable expectation of using and owning. How much can people write about a pen that they not only don't own, but probably won't?


I'm in the camp that the new Wahl-Eversharps are flat-out beauties, but also beyond that comfort zone of price. I right now have $100 to splurge on a new pen and all of my pen purchases have never breached that magical price point at all or by much.

I'd love to write about the menthol Skyliner 50 pen and hold it and write with it and take it to go get ice cream and make a big fuss about it because frankly it looks amazing. But... it's over my budget, and unlike my government, I have and keep mine fairly seriously.

I think the problem is that there are so many great choices out there now in the around $100 and lower price ranges that appeal to a good chunk of the pen-loving community. I'm sure the WE reissues will get their niche market, but with prices starting at $150 and up, it will definitely stay niche.

#25 raging.dragon

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:10

I watched this video yesterday. So you're the vixen! (I think I clicked on a link from fpgeeks.com.)

I like the green one, and I want to try it. The nib looks like it might be similar to the Falcon "semi-flex." Or "soft." Or maybe the Pilot soft F/M.

And the green color is Japanese to me. I had plastic items (a cute little radio, for instance) when I was a kid -- things made in Japan -- of a similar color, so it appeals to me.

Hm... I have Waterman cartridges.... :-D

And a syringe.


The pastel colours of the Skyliner 50's line remind me of cars and appliances from the 1950's. Which I suspect is exactly what the designer (Syd?) intended!

Edited by raging.dragon, 06 March 2013 - 05:10.


#26 raging.dragon

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:12

So does it take Waterman carts or standard international?

Waterman
Syd


Aren't Waterman cartridges international?


I believe Waterman cartridges are longer...other than that I think there is no real difference.


Yes. I believe most pens that work with Waterman cartridges also work with standard international cartidges?

#27 raging.dragon

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:26

Honestly, the pens that seem to get the most coverage are the ones that the most people can have some reasonable expectation of using and owning. How much can people write about a pen that they not only don't own, but probably won't?


I'm in the camp that the new Wahl-Eversharps are flat-out beauties, but also beyond that comfort zone of price. I right now have $100 to splurge on a new pen and all of my pen purchases have never breached that magical price point at all or by much.

I'd love to write about the menthol Skyliner 50 pen and hold it and write with it and take it to go get ice cream and make a big fuss about it because frankly it looks amazing. But... it's over my budget, and unlike my government, I have and keep mine fairly seriously.

I think the problem is that there are so many great choices out there now in the around $100 and lower price ranges that appeal to a good chunk of the pen-loving community. I'm sure the WE reissues will get their niche market, but with prices starting at $150 and up, it will definitely stay niche.


I disagree. The world's best known fountain pen brand sells pens that are mostly (if not exclusively?) a lot more expensive than the new Wahl Eversharps. Or alternately one could argue that all fountain pens, regardless of price, are a niche market. Niche or not, the fountain pen market is still big enough for Wahl Eversharp to succeed without competing head on against Pilot, Sheaffer, Parker, TWSBI and the many other brands serving the sub $100 market.

#28 JonSzanto

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 06:20

I disagree. The world's best known fountain pen brand sells pens that are mostly (if not exclusively?) a lot more expensive than the new Wahl Eversharps. Or alternately one could argue that all fountain pens, regardless of price, are a niche market. Niche or not, the fountain pen market is still big enough for Wahl Eversharp to succeed without competing head on against Pilot, Sheaffer, Parker, TWSBI and the many other brands serving the sub $100 market.

My original comment was not on the appropriateness of the price of the new W-E pens (which I believe to be very fair), but as to what reasons might account for a lack of visibility in forum/blog postings. To compare the start-up (of a known, albeit historic, brand) of a new pen with a long-standing (expensive) legend is not the issue at hand. FPN may very well have the largest membership of any online pen forum, but a regular reading of the site shows a skewing to the lower-end area of the market. The MB fanbois and grrls get their posts in, but there is a lot more written traffic regarding low-cost pens. I believe that people tend to express interest and enthusiasm for that which they can partake of.

That FPs as a whole are a niche item is also not the issue, but whether or not within that niche exists other levels of entry and engagement. I believe there are, and that it explains a bit why not more people have jumped on the W-E bandwagon.
"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
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#29 hot cocoa

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:06

I disagree. The world's best known fountain pen brand sells pens that are mostly (if not exclusively?) a lot more expensive than the new Wahl Eversharps. Or alternately one could argue that all fountain pens, regardless of price, are a niche market. Niche or not, the fountain pen market is still big enough for Wahl Eversharp to succeed without competing head on against Pilot, Sheaffer, Parker, TWSBI and the many other brands serving the sub $100 market.


I'm not in argument with you as I wasn't saying that there weren't more expensive pens than the WEs (as is easily seen with just a casual glance at half the forums on FPN) or that WEs don't have a potential buyer base. I was concurring more with JonSzanto in the how the demographic for less expensive pens (myself included) seems to be rather vocal and active here and on pen blogs. Which seems to make it a little challenging for a new-old brand without entry-level prices to fire up a potential broad base of users.

And truthfully, I don't know how elastic the fountain pen market is at the $150 plus range. So many more factors are at play in addition to price at that level and beyond. Hard to say without firm data.

I really enjoyed the video review of the Skyliner 50...it just looks like the kind of pen that perfectly balances usability with understated classiness. WE seems to have a vision of where its line is going and how it's going to get there, and I can appreciate that even if I can't afford it. B)

Edited by hot cocoa, 06 March 2013 - 07:07.


#30 sebastel23

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:24

Yes. I believe most pens that work with Waterman cartridges also work with standard international cartidges?



most.
but some pens do not unscrew the section where you can grab a short cartridge. you might need to remove the nib, and still you might need to push with a long pin in order to get the empty short cartridge out.

#31 JonSzanto

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 18:39

I've prodded FPGeeks to post about the new WE company a few times - nothing.
Oh well - maybe Syd can "Stimulate" them (as he put it) :hmm1:

Whether you changed the batteries in your electric cattle prod, Syd's arm-twisting gained strength, or they happened to see a thread like this, Geeks have now mentioned W-E.
"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#32 jonro

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 19:23

I would like to know more about the ceramic coated nibs that ship with most of the pens (I don't think the 50s collection has them). I've never seen them mentioned before and would like to know about their writing characteristics and what makes them different from typical stainless steel nibs. It looks like Syd has done a great job with these.

#33 Drone

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 03:57

@JonSzanto - Yes, I just saw the short post about W.E. on the FPGeeks blog. I also left them a little turd in the post comments area. I feel better now.

@jonro - Hey, thanks to you I just noticed the description of the Skliner 50 nib actually does not mention the ceramic coating. However, the Skyline Classic (for-example) description does. So maybe there actually is a difference between the performance of the two nibs(?)

* From the Skyliner 50 description:

"Nib: Fine to Medium Semi-flex Rhodium plated stainless steel"

* From the Skyline Classic Collection description:

"Nib: Fine-Medium Semi-flex ceramic coated gold plated stainless steel"

A tad confusing - no?

#34 VirtuThe3rd

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 05:36

Nice review! Thanks for the sharing this.
I'm looking forword your new reviews!!
Keep up great work. : )

From Japan,
Kota Adachi

#35 Earthdawn

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 06:37

@jonro - Hey, thanks to you I just noticed the description of the Skliner 50 nib actually does not mention the ceramic coating. However, the Skyline Classic (for-example) description does. So maybe there actually is a difference between the performance of the two nibs(?)

* From the Skyliner 50 description:

"Nib: Fine to Medium Semi-flex Rhodium plated stainless steel"

* From the Skyline Classic Collection description:

"Nib: Fine-Medium Semi-flex ceramic coated gold plated stainless steel"

A tad confusing - no?


My understanding is there are 3 types of nibs they offer

Fine to Medium Semi-flex Rhodium plated stainless steel
Fine-Medium Semi-flex ceramic coated gold plated stainless steel
Medium solid 18 Karat 2-tone nib

Each one an upgrade from the other...Like I said in the video Syd told me they will be adding the ability to upgrade the nibs on the pens if you want. They are all interchangeable.

#36 Wahlnut

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:30

@JonSzanto - Yes, I just saw the short post about W.E. on the FPGeeks blog. I also left them a little turd in the post comments area. I feel better now.

@jonro - Hey, thanks to you I just noticed the description of the Skliner 50 nib actually does not mention the ceramic coating. However, the Skyline Classic (for-example) description does. So maybe there actually is a difference between the performance of the two nibs(?)

* From the Skyliner 50 description:

"Nib: Fine to Medium Semi-flex Rhodium plated stainless steel"

* From the Skyline Classic Collection description:

"Nib: Fine-Medium Semi-flex ceramic coated gold plated stainless steel"

A tad confusing - no?



Very observant and correct conclusion...No confusion at all. The Rhodium Plated Stainless steel nibs, nice as they are do not have the ceramic. The Ceramic gold platers are a step up and a step silkier on paper.

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#37 Drone

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:49

Very observant and correct conclusion...No confusion at all. The Rhodium Plated Stainless steel nibs, nice as they are do not have the ceramic. The Ceramic gold platers are a step up and a step silkier on paper.

Syd


So the Rhodium Plated Stainless and Ceramic Gold Plated Stainless nibs perform the same in terms of flex - but the ceramic nibs are "silkier" on paper? Obviously I'm obsessed with flex :puddle: maybe I should seek help with that...

#38 raging.dragon

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:13

I would like to know more about the ceramic coated nibs that ship with most of the pens (I don't think the 50s collection has them). I've never seen them mentioned before and would like to know about their writing characteristics and what makes them different from typical stainless steel nibs. It looks like Syd has done a great job with these.


Based on comments in other threads, the ceramic coating covers the entire nib, including the tip. This is supposed to make the ceramic coated nibs smoother than other nibs (weasel words used because I haven't tried the ceramic nibs and am repeating what others have said).

http://www.fountainp...howtopic=236503
http://www.fountainp...howtopic=237494
http://www.fountainp...howtopic=240764

#39 Drone

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:29

Based on comments in other threads, the ceramic coating covers the entire nib, including the tip.


Oh my, I missed that (or just plain forgot). Thanks for the links.

This is very important to know IMO...

I was under the mistaken impression the ceramic had something to do with flexibility. Obviously I don't know much about this ceramic coated nib subject.

I'm quite adept at tuning nibs the way I like them and will tune a new pen without hesitation if I feel it needs it.

If the ceramic coating on the W.E. nibs is there for smoothness, then tuning these nibs sounds like a bad idea indeed. Hmmm...

#40 raging.dragon

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:45

Based on comments in other threads, the ceramic coating covers the entire nib, including the tip.


Oh my, I missed that (or just plain forgot). Thanks for the links.

This is very important to know IMO...

I was under the mistaken impression the ceramic had something to do with flexibility. Obviously I don't know much about this ceramic coated nib subject.

I'm quite adept at tuning nibs the way I like them and will tune a new pen without hesitation if I feel it needs it.

If the ceramic coating on the W.E. nibs is there for smoothness, then tuning these nibs sounds like a bad idea indeed. Hmmm...


Depends on the type of tuning. Adjusting tines and flow should be as normal; however, I'd avoid using abrasives to smooth a ceramic coated nib as that would either destroy the coating (if the abrasive is harder than the ceramic) or be completely futile (if the ceramic is harder than the abrasive). The ceramic coating is probably too thin to significantly affect flex, but if anything would make the nib very slightly stiffer.

Flex would primarily be determined by the steel part of the nib: exact alloy used, work hardening, heat treatment, and the physical dimensions of the nib (especially the thickness, length, and width of the tines).






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