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1958 Sheaffer Pfmi Review


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7 replies to this topic

#1 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 22:26

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Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

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#2 pavoni

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 23:22

This is my favourite type of review: handwritten, with historical background, on a pen I was ignorant on.
Thank you very much for this super review Georges :clap1:

Pavoni.

#3 markiv

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 00:24

Nice review of a desirable pen. Are later PFM pens bigger than the first generation pens?
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#4 jar

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:15

Nice review of a desirable pen. Are later PFM pens bigger than the first generation pens?


Nope, they were all the same size.

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#5 jandrese

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 14:22

Hi Georges, thanks for the nice review. I inherited a minty PFM III. Everything about it was loveable, but for me the extra fine nib was unusable. Reluctantly I sold it. Anything larger than a fine nib comes a quite a premium, but if I ever run across a smooth medium or a broad I will buy it!

#6 inkstainedruth

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 15:04

How does this compare with the earlier model Snorkels? I have a Snorkel Valiant I picked up a couple of months ago, but haven't used it for fear that the gaskets and/or sac need to be replaced.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

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#7 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 18:23

Hi Georges, thanks for the nice review. I inherited a minty PFM III. Everything about it was loveable, but for me the extra fine nib was unusable. Reluctantly I sold it. Anything larger than a fine nib comes a quite a premium, but if I ever run across a smooth medium or a broad I will buy it!

I have one navy blue pfmIII with an extra fine nib I don't use it because I prefer my palladium silver nibs even though it is smooth,it is not comparable to the palladium silver nibbed pfmI and II. A such pen is ideal if you do technical drawings or accountancy. The pfm inlaid extra fine writes like a true extra fine japanese nib. I used during two years my Navy Blue PFMII with a slightly flexible medium nib, now I am going to use daily my green PFMI with its fine medium nib. Consider that 255-275$ is a start for a fine nibbed PFM, for a medium one in perfect shape 280-350$, for a broad one 350-400$ and for the rare stubs or obliques made in palladium silver 400$-to +500$ is what you should expect

Edited by georges zaslavsky, 17 February 2013 - 18:23.

Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#8 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 18:26

How does this compare with the earlier model Snorkels? I have a Snorkel Valiant I picked up a couple of months ago, but haven't used it for fear that the gaskets and/or sac need to be replaced.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

I think if the sac and gaskets were replaced by a profesionnal you shouldn't be worried to use it. My PFMII, my PFMII and my PFMI were all overhauled before I bought them. I have been using my navy blue PFMII during two years and it never let me down. Now I am going to use as much as possible my PFMI.
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time






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