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Pilot Custom Grandee


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#21 araybanfan

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:30

Hi Dillon, thanks for the detail observations/reminders from the perspective of a pen repairer to a much experienced pen user as yourself. I have been using fountain pens since the days when drafting boards took up major floor area in architects offices and till this day I still draw with pens as much as i write with them no matter what version of computer software is in vogue. If you look closely on my drawing on the owl the main line weight is the default nib size. I only flexed on the branch and some minor areas with the feathers. In terms of percentage, the expressed lines are merely a small fraction to the entire framework. So why bother over soft nibs or semi flex pens? Purely the advantage with the multitude of line weight without breaking the concentration along the process with a single pen is a big plus. I appreciate a light touch to the medium, as in a line is laid without much force than necessary in drawing. The balance of the pen becomes the driving force for the outtake. Thus the length and weight of a pen are major factors to me other than the nib size. For me i find the falcon to be a better candidate than this current pen for the purpose. Thanks for the recommendation for the fa nib, i find the line weight variations beyond my intended use. I favour a thinner line as with the falcon soft extra fine by default as compared to the fa. While you may have highlighted on the fundamental limitation with this particular vintage pen, there is no way i can stop using it. Surely the longevity may be an issue, as with all shoes soles that do run out eventually, should it be a reason to stop me from wearing them or running with them especially when they are so comfortable? My answer is a no. Likewise with this pen, given the low cost of a few bottles of ink, i am happy to see whatever mileage it holds to serve. Thanks.

Edited by araybanfan, 11 February 2013 - 01:39.


#22 MYU

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:00

Nice additional Omega/Pilot watch/pen combo, araybanfan. I don't wear my Omega Seamaster much either (it's more of a dress watch), but I still cherish it. I can see the grain of your pen more clearly and it's definitely maple. But as you said, it's not really important. I think the wood looks great regardless. I had applied some wood conditioner to mine (which darkened it a little) and then left it alone for about a year, to later find it had lightened again with the wood drying out some. Applying the conditioner brought the darker coloration back and liveliness to the wood.

Pilot had made another wooden pen with this material, using the Custom body. But it uses the traditional large body inlaid nib, which has practically no spring to it. It's a nice nib in its own right, but I feel it is best served with an all metal body.

Edited by MYU, 11 February 2013 - 03:02.

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#23 araybanfan

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 05:43

Nice additional Omega/Pilot watch/pen combo, araybanfan. I don't wear my Omega Seamaster much either (it's more of a dress watch), but I still cherish it. I can see the grain of your pen more clearly and it's definitely maple. But as you said, it's not really important. I think the wood looks great regardless. I had applied some wood conditioner to mine (which darkened it a little) and then left it alone for about a year, to later find it had lightened again with the wood drying out some. Applying the conditioner brought the darker coloration back and liveliness to the wood.

Pilot had made another wooden pen with this material, using the Custom body. But it uses the traditional large body inlaid nib, which has practically no spring to it. It's a nice nib in its own right, but I feel it is best served with an all metal body.


Hi Myu, thanks for the reply. Yes mine has darken quite abit as well from the dressing. As for production i am aware of a size 10 n 15 nib made out of wood from pilot currently. If you like metal body which the name myu should be indicative, the metal falcon should be ideal. My falcon nib has more resistance than the grandee, while both are soft. You will appreciate con 70 being the largest converter to match over the resin falcon. Pilot/namiki also makes a series of sterling silver version with an inlaid nib which too has a hint of softness. Sailor trident and parker t1 are great examples of metal pens as well. I am sure the rotring 600 is no stranger to you. I still have it on my desk at home. Like the watch it is no longer within my routine. Btw OT i read seamaster evolved out from the constellation series. I am quite surprised to see a de ville/ seamaster version. Your dial is expectionally clean. I have yet to get mine clean or replaced. The display looks like plexiglass as it is with mine too. I am very much used to a 44mm now as my daily wearer. Thanks.

Edited by araybanfan, 11 February 2013 - 05:45.