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Cursive Lowercase "r"


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170 replies to this topic

Poll: Lowercase cursive "r" (642 member(s) have cast votes)

How do you write your cursive lowercase "r"? (please see picture)

  1. 1. Upright stroke followed by a small "hook". (192 votes [27.95%])

    Percentage of vote: 27.95%

  2. 2. Slanted upstroke, then a gentle slide downwards, followed by a steep curve downwards. (428 votes [62.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 62.30%

  3. 3. I always capitalize the "R" (even within lowercase text). (8 votes [1.16%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.16%

  4. 4. Some other way (feel free to specify below). (55 votes [8.01%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.01%

  5. 5. I always skip the lowercase letter "r" when I write anything! (4 votes [0.58%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.58%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#81 Garageboy

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 19:42

Always loved the Spencerian/Palmer r's
On a side note, what's the "correct" way to write the b and r in "break"?

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#82 gfs2222

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 21:04

Always loved the Spencerian/Palmer r's
On a side note, what's the "correct" way to write the b and r in "break"?

 

The B connects with the R and the R goes up higher than the other minuscule letters if you get me  :P


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#83 JeffPDX2

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 17:56

Second option; do I detect a them regarding the nuns in school? That is where I learned as well. :-)


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#84 kenfraser

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 06:56

Alfred Fairbank in "A Handwriting Manual" offers this succinct description of the construction of the Italic minuscule r.

 

"The letter r is like an incomplete n. The branching from the stem should occur hign enough to prevent the letter looking like v."

 

Ken



#85 nujak

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 04:26

Mine definitely looks most like the spencerian script. 

 

Here are five letters 'r' which are currently in fairly common use.

From left to right they are :-

English Roundhand (Copperplate)
Engrosser's Script
Spencerian Script
Italic
Alternative English Roundhand (Copperplate)

caliken

fivelettersr600.jpg


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#86 GabrielleDuVent

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 12:25

Here are five letters 'r' which are currently in fairly common use.

From left to right they are :-

English Roundhand (Copperplate)
Engrosser's Script
Spencerian Script
Italic
Alternative English Roundhand (Copperplate)

caliken

fivelettersr600.jpg

 

I've seen all of them, partly because I've lived in three continents and learned penmanship in all three. I myself use Spencerian when writing in cursive.

 

The first and the second I was taught in England in the very early 90s (that sounds ages ago). The schools do not teach proper cursive any more, and amongst my British friends I alone am the one who can write in cursive. 

 

Spencerian and Copperplate are predominantly taught in the US and Japan; my mother taught me Spencerian, my father uses Copperplate, they both learned their alphabets in Japan. I learned Copperplate in US primary school as well.

 

I've seen my Italian friend use Italic; my French friend uses Engrosser or Spencerian. 

 

Um, I have no idea about the Germans; my mate writes in what I'm assuming to be hieroglyphics. :P


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Tu t'éveilles, alors le rêve est oublié. 

 

-Jean Cocteau, from Plaint-Chant, 1923


#87 theexpanciluser

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:23

since i was vorn in bulgaria we use cirilic so there is not an r like that, but i started learning french from 1st grade so yeah that i how i learned it and it wont really go away even tough there are lots of differences i find in the french and english cursive . but i choose 2

#88 knarflj

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 13:08

I'm also inconsistent (and not just with the letter r), but I don't think I've ever used #3.


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#89 F104

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 01:08

Form #2, more or less: in most cases, my 'r' has two lines, one left, upward, one right, downward, with some kind of connecting line in between, acrossward, the third line.  Sometimes the left and right lines are nearly vertical; sometimes they converge, or appear to, toward the top; sometimes, they lean left or right.  They might or might not be parallel in any of these configurations.  The connecting line is sometimes straight, sometimes curved, and is usually higher at the left end than at the right.  From time to time a little loop emerges as the upward left line transitions into the short acrossward one.

 

Except when my 'r' goes completely pear-shaped, at which times it might appear as a squarish thing, or an upside down 'u'.  Or not.



#90 ac12

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 03:49

Many of my letters have changed from how I was taught in grade school.

Some changed purely to write faster (in college where I did not know short-hand), some changed to make them look more "fancy," others changed because I decided I did not like how the script letter looked (my upper case S looks like this "S").

 

As I am practicing improving my handwriting, some of my letters are going back to how I was first taught. 

My biggest change is slowing down so I can simply form the letters better vs. the squiggly line when I write fast.

My lower case r now looks like #2, it used to look like a hump or an upside down u because I was too rushed to make the top point of the r in #2.

But old habits die hard.  I catch myself speeding up and relapsing.

 


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#91 GClef

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 05:23


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#92 Mr Ink

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 05:48

GClef, your handwriting is a work of art :thumbup:



#93 isoc

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 15:28

This is the r the nuns taught me oh so many years ago. I've tried others, but this one will not go away. :rolleyes:

That's the one I try to do, but it doesn't always look that good!

 

- Ted



#94 EpicDragon7

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 00:16

the way I was taught is like #2, but with a little loop at the top left bit.



#95 trdsf

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 21:27

If I'm writing for myself, it's an unornamented bump, not unlike a script Cyrillic lower case г; if I'm writing for others to read, it'll be more like #1.


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#96 Dickkooty2

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 21:53

http://s271.photobuc...html?sort=3&o=1

 

… yet another way ...



#97 AllenG

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 08:30

14061072755_ede4121ab4_c.jpg

#98 Mardi13

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 21:27

I was just thinking , as I try to retrieve what little skill I had at cursive now that I am playing with FPs, that lowercase "r" is by far the hardest letter for me. I either get just a little unidentifiable peak or I have to really...slow...down in order to write it more correctly. This thread is old but I found it all interesting.

#99 Hardcase

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 22:14

"r" has always given me fits.  I'm 52 years old and still struggle.  In the past month, I've started really paying attention to cursive writing and I'm attempting to teach myself to use #1 after decades of flailing around with #2 (again, sounds like potty talk).  My penmanship has always tended to be mediocre at best, so I'm really working at getting better.  Practice, hopefully, will make, if not perfect, at least pretty good.

 

My third grade teacher would be proud of my renewed effort, I think.


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#100 Tojusi

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 12:46

I guess I may post a sample as well.
Mine is a catalan tong-twister, designed to teach kids pronounce the rolled "r" (and to give a hard time to those who can not): it goes "Un carro carregat de rocs corria per la carretera de Roses fent catacric-catacroc, i el carreter, carregat de ràbia, li corria al darrere" (meaning: a carriage full of rocks ran on Roses -A town- road, making cracking noises and the muleteer, full of rage, ran behind").


DSC_0289.jpg

The above script is very close to what was taught in Finnish schools in the early 80s. The "p" was different here, though (assuming that the third to last letter on the first line is a "p").








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