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Parker 45 Flighter Deluxe


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24 replies to this topic

#1 sargetalon

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 15:02

Make: Parker
Model: 45 Flighter Deluxe
Color: Stainless Steel with Gold Accents
Nib: 10K Fine (Hooded)
Filling System: Cartridge/Converter (Squeeze-Type)
Date Acquired: 12/26/2012


This is the first of what I hope to be many reviews of the pens I own and I hope that they prove useful. I was fortunate enough to acquire a new old stock model from Five Star Pens and have been using it exclusively for about a week. This example dates to circa 1970. The pen has a striking appearance as soon as you lay your eyes on it, very streamlined with well placed gold accents. The standard Flighter has the same appearance minus the gold accents. I just cannot get over the look and that keeps using this pen fresh and enjoyable. I can’t comment on any packaging or other materials as my example did not include any.

**Note: Photos were not taken by myself but are actual photos of this pen from the retailer.
____________________________________________________________________________________

1. Appearance & Design (10/10) – Striking, beautifully styled pen

This pen is quickly becoming a favorite of mine based on sheer looks alone. Very streamlined appearance which is industrial but also with something more at the same time. It’s hard to explain. The gold accents are perfectly placed, not overdone, and really help to make this pen pop. It's not so fancy in appearance that you're afraid to use it but it's not plain either. With the hooded nib, I don't think anyone has noticed that I'm even using a fountain pen.

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2. Construction & Quality (10/10) – A pen that you’re not afraid to use

Appears very durable with its stainless steel construction and plastic section. The nib is hooded and appears well protected for all but the most direct impacts. Certainly looks like it can handle whatever you might dish out.

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3. Weight & Dimensions (9/10) – A shorter pen but a good balance and weight in hand

This pen is 5.31 inches capped and 5.79 inches posted. It fits well in the hand. The weight is 0.70 ounces which gives it a bit of a substantial feel without being cumbersome or difficult to write with over longer periods. Certainly more heft than my Lamy Safari and I appreciate that in this pen.

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4. Nib & Performance (8/10) – Fine nib that gets better with time

The nib is a 10K in fine point and it’s my understanding that there are many variations (12K, 14K, etc) in nibs. In my experience, it was not a joy right out of the box. Sticking with it and five pages later, the nib is really starting to come into its own. The line is a little wider and little wetter than some of my other fines but certainly not unpleasantly so. It’s really getting smoother with more use and it’s such a joy to write with that using it is not a problem. There is a bit of a temperamental sweet spot here and my nib is not very forgiving if you stray even slightly from its preferred orientation. One final note is that the nibs are interchangeable which is always a big plus to me.

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5. Filling System & Maintenance (8/10) – Standard cartridge converter

This is a cartridge converter pen. It takes proprietary Parker cartridges which do limit you in color choices but they do have convenience in their favor. This comes with a squeeze type converter which works well. Seems to have a decent capacity. Fairly standard stuff here. Should be very durable for some time to come.

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6. Cost & Value (10/10) – A true bargain for what you get

This was marketed as more of an entry level pen from what I understand and its pricing today is still quite affordable. These can be picked up for around $70 for a restored/functioning/NOS pen. I do think you get an amazing amount of pen for the money. The flighter is a solid performer and is very well built which will allow it to last for the foreseeable future. An excellent value for what you’re getting.


7. Conclusion (Final score 55/60; 91.7%) – An excellent daily user/display piece

I’m loving the looks and the feel of this pen. The more I use it, the more I fall in love with it. These are available at a reasonable price and appear to be quite durable, requiring little maintenance. I would certainly recommend this pen to anyone getting started in fountain pens or to help round out any collection.

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#2 myn

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 16:38

Great review. Thanks so much for doing this.
"Minds are like parachutes. They only function when open." James Dewar
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#3 GRJP

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 18:38

Great review.

Now I'm dying to get my 45 flighter... I have a normal one with a fine nib and it is an amazing writer and a beautiful pen. and it is amazing how good it still looks and how sturdy they still feel. A true pleasure to use.
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#4 notbob

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 19:02

I've been wanting to get a Flighter ever since I got into FPs. Before that I used my Parker SS Jotter w/ pencil set exclusively. Parker T-Balls have always been the ONLY ball point, IMO. An all SS Flighter would complete my set. I've seen plenty of NIB/NOS Flighters with F nibs, but would jump at an M nib. You say the nibs are interchangeable. Who sells jes the nibs alone?
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#5 sargetalon

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 23:00

I've been wanting to get a Flighter ever since I got into FPs. Before that I used my Parker SS Jotter w/ pencil set exclusively. Parker T-Balls have always been the ONLY ball point, IMO. An all SS Flighter would complete my set. I've seen plenty of NIB/NOS Flighters with F nibs, but would jump at an M nib. You say the nibs are interchangeable. Who sells jes the nibs alone?


I have no affiliation but have been satisfied with my transaction with five star pens. If you follow this link and scroll to the bottom of the page, you'll find a new old stock medium octanium nib for sale at $12. I'm sure similar can be found elsewhere with some searching.

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#6 notbob

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 13:02

the page, you'll find a new old stock medium octanium nib for sale at $12.


Great! Another source. Thank you.
nulla dies sine linea

#7 Mags

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 15:33

Excellent review, I have a 45 but plastic found in the wild with a bold nib that lays a fire hose line of ink down. Keeping it inked is a chore but it is a delightful pen. I love the metal look.....very classy find by you in such great condition!
Rob Maguire (Plse call me "M or Mags" like my friends do...)I use a Tablet, Apple Pencil and a fountain pen. Targas, Sailor, MB, Visconti all wonderful.

#8 nxn96

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 15:46

I've got a 45 Flighter much like yours and have pretty much the same opinion of this pen. Over its life, Parker produced many "upgrade" versions of the 45, such as this pen, that were much a cut above the basic "schoolpen".

Thanks very much for the review.

#9 rochester21

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 20:52

I agree- the nib really does get better with time. The nib on the 45 actually takes a "break-in" period of about 2 weeks of daily use.

Edited by rochester21, 03 January 2013 - 20:54.


#10 rwilsonedn

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 21:51

When a Parker 45, or for that matter the Jotter or even a decent Vector comes up in rotation, I am reminded how thoroughly Parker (and Sheaffer--I have a NoNonsense habit) perfected the entry-level pen many decades ago. I don't think they have been surpassed since. These pens have influenced my view of how much an excellent writer should cost, and at what point one begins paying for appearance and status, not writing quality.
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#11 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 02:32

Just got my 45 Flighter - late 60's 14K M nib. Such a wonderful pen. Mine doesn't have the gold finial (is that the right word?) on the bottom that yours does. Either it never had it or it was lost at some point.


Brad
 
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#12 lavendrie

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 00:16

Thanks for the review of the Parker 45. I still have a standard Flighter pen and ballpoint set which I bought in the 60s. I used it  regularly for a number of years and it was responsible for starting my pen collecting bug.



#13 Sasha Royale

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 00:34

The Parker 45 is designed to be maintained by th user.  It's easy. 

Whatever other fountain pen I have with me, a Parker 45 is also in my pocket. 

so it was through college.  So it has been for forty years since. 

 

BTW:  If your P45 is to be stored for more than a couple of weeks, remove the cap.

Otherwise, the tension cap springs will eventurally deform the plastci section. 

 

Please.  Everyone of you GET ONE .


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#14 donwinn

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 00:48

I have a 45 Flighter set -- FP and BP. Got both from FPN several years ago, and upgraded the flighter nib to an XF gold nib. I also have a non-flighter, with an upgraded XXF gold nib. Both nibs from Susan Wirth, who (rightfully) insisted that she bring them to the Dallas Pen Show and try them out before I bought them. I had asked her to bring an XF and and XXF, and after I tried both, I bought both. I like the balance of the Flighter over the non flighter. I also have two (2) 45 desk pens. which have the nibs I removed from the Flighter and the non-flighter regular pens. Can you discern that I like Parker 45s?


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#15 Dr_P

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 01:01

Congratulations for buying a 45! 

 

I used one (plastic body and gold filled cap) through my High School (6 years) and then University (another 6 years) (no, I'm not slow. I took long careers and double Diplomas  :) ) and it became the best writer I ever had. I recently bought another one as well as a CT Arrow (plastic cap) and they are excellent writers and outstanding options for entry-level pens. 

 

Besides, the simplicity of their design is remarkable. And they are so easy to disassemble and clean! 

 

Enjoy yours for long years.

 

Dr_P



#16 5370H55V

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:30

Great review! I've been using a navy 45 with a steel XF nib for notetaking for a month and its been working great so far. I like it so much that I'm looking to upgrade to a flighter version with a gold XF or XXF nib.



#17 amk

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 10:03

The 45 is a lovely pen, isn't it? I'm lucky enough to have picked up two flighters very cheaply in junk shops, as well as quite a few plastic ones from car boot sales. The wonderful thing about the 45 is that they turn up so often in the wild, and because the nib is hooded, people don't think to look to see whether it's a gold nib, either - so I started my collection very cheaply indeed. All the nibs are very nice, in fact I'd say for pens picked up in the wild, my 45 gold nibs are slightly better than their 51 cousins. (That could prove a controversial statement!)

 

Someone commented on the gold 'finial' at the end. I've got one without one at all, one with a black plastic one, and now I see this gold one - there seem to be a number of versions. Wonder if anyone knows how many and whether they are of different dates?

 

Sasha Royale - THANK YOU for the tip on uncapping. So many 45s I see at sales have the funny wiggly curve to the section, I wondered if it was a rogue batch only produced in France! :-)


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#18 rockydoggy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 11:10

Ditto on the thanks re: the cap suggestion, Sasha Royale.

I used my 45 throughout grad school back in the 70s--it then fell out of rotation for quite some time.

When I finally dug it out to ink, I saw that the section had gotten warped. 

Didn't occur to me that the cap might have caused the problem.



#19 ac12

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 21:59

Two P45s took me thru college, and 2 degrees.

Back then I found the section too smooth and slippery for my oily/sweaty fingers, but very oddly, today I have no problem with the 45s section.

 

I'm bummed out that I can't find those pens.  They are "somewhere" in one of my many storage boxes.

But not to fear, I've purchased more 45 as regular writers and to add to my meager collection of 45s.  There are so many different color and trim combinations.

 

As was mentioned, the 45 can be completely disassembled for cleaning, so changing ink is real easy with this pen.  No more old ink hiding somewhere in the feed.  That makes it a great pen to use to test inks, cuz you can clean it out easily and completely.


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#20 titrisol

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 23:32

I have my father's coronet, as well as some other 45's

It is a joy to write with.








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