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Pelikan M1000 Ef Nib Or Pelikan M800 Ef Nib?


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27 replies to this topic

#21 Nibwitz

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 08:03

@FriendAmos

I still think I can read properly; 'nor did I experience any of the alleged springiness'

Questions however do arise about your comprehensive reading capacities; where did I write a single line out of which one can make up that I assume people are buying the M1000 for it's springiness? Were did I write that I assume my experience is universal? Nowhere.

Now you read again, 'carefully': I stated: a pen with (for me) a pleasant soft nib



Anyway; I never did mean to question anyones motivation on buying or liking the M1000.
My point remains the same; I personally think it's a pitty that, as I am liking soft nibs, the M1000 is the only modern Pelikan pen I can find one in.

Enjoy your pen.
"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"
Georges Braque

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#22 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 22:20

I have testwritten a 1000 with an ef nib but it wrote too thin for me so I chose one with a f and later bought one with a m
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time
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#23 Nibwitz

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 18:33

Today I again tested a M1000, and to my surprise the nib was not very springy. How can that happen? Has there been a change in manufacturing in recent years? A year ago I tested a M1000 which had a extremely soft nib, that made it very different compared to the M800 that I tried at the same occasion.
Also today, I wrote with a M800 'M' size nib, which was a bit disappointing to me. Not a lot of 'feedback'; a sort of 'numb' feeling on the paper. I must say that I wouldn't put my M200 steel nib aside for this M800...
As a Pelikan enthousiast, I was surprised by how well a Parker Duofold (small size) did write ('F'). Better than the M800, imho.
I wouldn't pay so much money for a C/C pen however.
"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"
Georges Braque

#24 Silent Speaker

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 11:04

Today I again tested a M1000, and to my surprise the nib was not very springy. How can that happen? Has there been a change in manufacturing in recent years? A year ago I tested a M1000 which had a extremely soft nib, that made it very different compared to the M800 that I tried at the same occasion.


I do hope that this is merely a one off manufacturing incident or an error of subjectivity; if not that would be a real pity and will definitely curb my enthusiasm for (and halt my plans for purchasing) a new M1000 in the near future.

Can anyone else who has fondled an M1000 of recent make(full gold cap jewel/end cap) verify this? Or report any similar experiences?

It would be a damn shame if Pelikan decided that it could no longer risk a softer nib for all the usual reasons why modern companies eschew softer nibs (user stupidity and carelessness being perhaps the prime reason).

#25 Nibwitz

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 11:26

I don't know the turnover-time of the shop where I tried the M1000, perhaps it has been there for a long time. I mean; could as well be that the older M1000 are stiffer than nowadays?
"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"
Georges Braque

#26 Silent Speaker

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 12:28

I don't know the turnover-time of the shop where I tried the M1000, perhaps it has been there for a long time. I mean; could as well be that the older M1000 are stiffer than nowadays?

That could be.
Do you happen to remember what the captop looked like?

#27 Nibwitz

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 17:29

No sorry I didn't look at that. I'm going to try another M1000 in a different shop tomorrow, so let's see...
"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"
Georges Braque

#28 Nibwitz

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 16:08

The continuing story; tried 3 different M1000's today; 2X F, 1xEF.
All three were 'springy': the tip of the nib gives in easy under pressure. Besides; both 'F' sized nibs were extremely wet writers; a very wet and dark line. For me personally to wet.
But I guess that such things can be adjusted.

Anyhow, the M800 nib is very stiff, and thus very different.

Also, I tried a M400, and to my surprise, it had a somewhat soft nib as well. Not like the M1000, but less stiff than the M600 and M800 I tried today.

Conclusion: the M1000 is springy, the other nibs are rigid, perhaps the Pelikan nibs differ a little, as can be seen with the M400 described here.
There are no 2 nibs the same I think.
"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"
Georges Braque






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