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Photo

Omas Milord


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9 replies to this topic

#1 jgysenbergs

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 15:55

This is a classy fountain pen, still the same as the 1932 'Urmodell'. Fact sheet after the click.

Comments are most welcome! Thanks for reading - JG

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The light you see at the end of the tunnel is that of a fast approaching train.

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#2 tenney

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 20:11

Am I correct that this is a modern (year 2000) remake of the 1932 pen? And is it a piston filler that feels like a MB filler, or was it actually made using a MB piston system? Thank you.
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#3 jar

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 20:25

Likely no MB filling system involved or even copied, at least hopefully.

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#4 jgysenbergs

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 23:43

Yes indeed, it's a basic piston filler that feels like the MB system, not a copy. In all its simplicity, it is a beautiful, classic design without any frills or distractions. Does that count as a remake or just a continuation of the 1932 model? The materials used have changed but the same form factor still lives on.

One idea sprung to my mind and it probably came up earlier on the FPN: what's the most classic (formal, functional ...) FP ever designed? This one? An MB 146? Or even a Parker 45?

As always, very welcome - JG
The light you see at the end of the tunnel is that of a fast approaching train.

#5 jgysenbergs

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 16:12

Links are gone. I'm working on it. Please find fact sheets here: https://gysenbergs.b...npenfactsheets/


The light you see at the end of the tunnel is that of a fast approaching train.

#6 jgysenbergs

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 16:56

Links are gone. I'm working on it. Please find fact sheets here: https://gysenbergs.b...npenfactsheets/


The light you see at the end of the tunnel is that of a fast approaching train.

#7 sansenri

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 22:34

Thank you for the fact sheet, I agree this pen is classy and very traditional.

From what I can see, your pen is not "precisely" a Milord, it's a later Omas Extra, Milord size...

 

These pens are made of vegetable resin and usually date back to the 80s-90s.

Omas was somewhat peculiar with its naming of pen models, so after having called its faceted pens first 557-F, 556-F, 555-F, then Paragon, Milord and Lady, at one point all of them were just called Omas Extra independently from the size (yes, somewhat confusing).

 

Actually it's very difficult to tell from your photo that this is a Milord size, these pens are identical, just smaller or larger in proportion, so without a size comparison your photo cannot show the actual size. We just know it from your fact sheet mentioning size.

Generally speaking however I myself would be comfortable in calling your pen a Milord.

 

This here in the photo is a Milord by size and by name, still in resin (click on the photo to open it and see the printing more closely)

fpn_1579473046__p1170293-4_omas_milord_r

Earlier models of the Milord were also made of cellulose nitrate and are recognizable by the two small opposite holes in the piston knob.


Edited by sansenri, 19 January 2020 - 22:45.


#8 jgysenbergs

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 22:44

Thanks for pointing out. I see now the title of this post is wrong, should be 'Omas Extra'. However, I've no way of correcting this (no 'edit' button). The fact sheet has it right.


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#9 sansenri

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 22:33

Thanks for pointing out. I see now the title of this post is wrong, should be 'Omas Extra'. However, I've no way of correcting this (no 'edit' button). The fact sheet has it right.

No issue, as I said, the name Extra was attributed to different models so does generate confusion used alone.

I have and Extra, Milord size, too, and comfortably call it a Milord myself... :)



#10 cgreenberg19

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 00:31

Nice review format. Thanks!








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