Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Parker Urban


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 jakelogan

jakelogan

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 412 posts
  • Location:My house...

Posted 14 August 2012 - 13:41

The Parker Urban in front of me while I am typing this was gifted to me by a relative in China. Here is the mini-review:

Parker Urban - brown, "grid" patterns, silver colored trims - fine point nib

First Impressions
In the states, I knew this pen as a somewhat inexpensive starter FP. When it was gifted to me, I was quite pleasantly surprised by the fancy packaging. A little paper gift bag, a cardboard sleeve, and a presentation box with papers all in a nice shade of light metallic brown. Upon opening the box, the shiny yet subdued brown and silver pen almost smiled at me with its small, curvy body.

Design, Build
The chocolate brown pen in silver trims and an hour-glass curvy shape makes this pen look very sexy. The finish is flawless with excellent attention to small fit details. Nothing jiggles around at all or feels cheap and the cap posts securely. The metal body adds a tiny bit of weight to the small pen. I have to say, this attractive little pen is built like one a couple times its price.

The curve in the middle that falls into the web of the hand makes the pen ergronomic; however, the section becomes thinner towards the nib end thus making it slightly uncomfortable to use for longer fingers such as mine.

Nib, Writing
The pen was slightly scratchy and a dry writer out of the box. After a couple flushes and a tine adjustment, it became a moderate writer on the dry side, even with the free-flowing Waterman Blue. The stainless steel fine nib is moderately smooth and is featured on a couple of Parker's lower-end series - for example the I.M. and Vector. There is no skipping at all and the flow is very even.

The nib has a "Lamy" feel to it for some reason. Like a Lamy standard steel nib, the Urban nib is on the dry side, moderately smooth in all directions, nail-stiff. The Urban nib is slightly less noisy than the Lamy but feels just as smooth (if not smoother on the side strokes). If you have a Lamy pen with an SS nib (e.g. Safari, Studio), this pen won't feel too much different.

Other Factors
The filling system is a straightforward cartridge/converter and comes with a Parker slide-converter. I am a fan of the slide converters because they make flushing the pen quick and easy; a simple slide motion that can be furiously repeated without fatique rather than the "Parker Deluxe Converter's" painful twisting and untwisting.

As the name of the pen implies, this is a very "urban" and modern styled pen. This pen is probably best for (and probably made for) women rather than men due to its cute, un-manly styling and its size.

Conclusion
This is an excellent choice for an entry-level pen for people with small hands (not my beefy ones). It is built like a tank - a small, sexy, high quality tank. The nib will probably need adjustment out of the box but as with most stiff steel nibs, it can be easily done and will write well afterwards.

EDIT: Typo

Edited by jakelogan, 14 August 2012 - 13:43.

Step 1: Buy another fountain pen
Step 2: ???
Step 3: Profit.

Sponsored Content

#2 Jamesbmorley

Jamesbmorley

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Location:Bedford, England

Posted 09 December 2012 - 19:29

Anyone else find the step between section and barrel a bit sharp and uncomfortable on the Urban? Same thing (but worse) on the Platignum No5 Studio
With thanks

J. B. Morley

#3 inkstainedruth

inkstainedruth

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,637 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:53

I didn't particularly notice the slope of the section, but I do have a love-hate relationship with mine in general. It's actually a replacement for the original one I got last winter, but had to return to Parker/Newell-Rubbermaid twice under warranty for problems. The original Urban was a (temporary) replacement for the Vector I thought I had lost. Urbans are fair amount larger and heavier than Vectors, but don't seem too badly balanced -- it just took some getting used to after such a slim, lightweight pen.
The first one wrote okay, but like jakelogan I'm finding the new one to be a fairly dry writer (it's a M nib, but I actually am getting a thicker line with my F nib Vector, which is something of a firehose). At the moment, I'm having pretty good luck with DC Supershow Blue in the Urban -- it seems to be a much smoother and a lot less scratchy with that ink.
I have had a couple of weird issues with the replacement pen, though -- last weekend I went to clean it and ended up soaking the nib and section a good deal -- everytime I thought I had it clean and the pen appeared to be flushing clear through the nib, I was getting ink seeming to be leaking from *between* the section and feed. I also, somehow, got the end of the cap bent today, and it wasn't staying on. My husband got the brass ring at the end of the cap unbent enough with a pair of pliers to make me feel more secure about the cap now staying on the pen when closed, but I have no idea how it happened in the first place (I don't *remember* dropping the cap in the last couple of days...). Given that it's the most expensive pen I own, I have to say I'm a bit grumpy (and I'm sure the folks at Parker will not be overly pleased if I have to return the pen yet *again* for service).
Personally, I'm not overly enamored of the slide converter, especially when flushing the pen out for repeated sliding at times like that I tend to use my thumbnail and that tends to be not too good for my nail.... :glare: And I'm not sure that a pen that probably is around $35-40 US (I got one of the sets they sell at places like Office Max for around $50, that comes with a few cartridges, a slide converter, and a bottle of Quink Black), is what I would call an "entry level" pen (especially after the $9 Vector) -- nor, given the issues I've had, would I necessarily call it a "tank".... YMMV.
But thanks for a thorough review, nonetheless.
Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#4 lovemy51

lovemy51

    legal? of course... and with all my papers. FP-friendly, mostly

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,634 posts
  • Location:near my pens and inks

Posted 10 December 2012 - 09:14

Anyone else find the step between section and barrel a bit sharp and uncomfortable on the Urban? Same thing (but worse) on the Platignum No5 Studio

noticeable, yes; uncomfortable, no -not in my case. i don't particularly like the shape of the barrel -that's my only quibble. it sure is a nice writer!

#5 Mike 59

Mike 59

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,658 posts
  • Location:40m north of London
  • Flag:

Posted 10 December 2012 - 11:10

Hi All, Well yes I do do find the chrome ring part is just where I want to grip it, but if hold my pen nearer the nib it's not a real problem. Shame it could not be smooth with the section.
Also the ink does get down in between the cartridge converter and the outside part, and leaks through to the outside.
In fact I have another brand of pen that does the same thing.
I find that if I take the converter off, fill with ink from the bottle, turn it upside down, and fit the pen section to it, all upside down, nib pointing up, it does not happen.
I have found the type/brand of ink makes a big difference to the flow, it's really worth trying different types.
The Urban and the 'I.M.' have the same nib, but it is not the same as Vector. I have tried, won't do that again !
But generally I think the Urban is well made and stylish, I don't think the pictures on the websites give a good idea of how well it is made.

Edited by Mike 59, 10 December 2012 - 20:50.


#6 Jamesbmorley

Jamesbmorley

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Location:Bedford, England

Posted 11 December 2012 - 00:23

Hi All, Well yes I do do find the chrome ring part is just where I want to grip it, but if hold my pen nearer the nib it's not a real problem. Shame it could not be smooth with the section.
Also the ink does get down in between the cartridge converter and the outside part, and leaks through to the outside.
In fact I have another brand of pen that does the same thing.
I find that if I take the converter off, fill with ink from the bottle, turn it upside down, and fit the pen section to it, all upside down, nib pointing up, it does not happen.
I have found the type/brand of ink makes a big difference to the flow, it's really worth trying different types.
The Urban and the 'I.M.' have the same nib, but it is not the same as Vector. I have tried, won't do that again !
But generally I think the Urban is well made and stylish, I don't think the pictures on the websites give a good idea of how well it is made.


Interesting technique Mike, thank you. I'll try this on my Sonnet.

Edited by Jamesbmorley, 11 December 2012 - 00:31.

With thanks

J. B. Morley

#7 Jamesbmorley

Jamesbmorley

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Location:Bedford, England

Posted 11 December 2012 - 00:30

Anyone else find the step between section and barrel a bit sharp and uncomfortable on the Urban? Same thing (but worse) on the Platignum No5 Studio

noticeable, yes; uncomfortable, no -not in my case. i don't particularly like the shape of the barrel -that's my only quibble. it sure is a nice writer!


I am yet to get how the barrel is ergonomic but I think it looks nice. It is a nice but dry writer so will see if any new inks arrive for Christmas to see if that helps before attempting to open the tines or some such operation.
With thanks

J. B. Morley

#8 Motomo

Motomo

    Eclectic Tastes

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 251 posts
  • Location:Columbus Ohio
  • Flag:

Posted 19 March 2013 - 21:32

Rec'd one of these late last week and have used it all weekend. I find it a good little pen. Mine is the midnight blue with chrome trim. Smooth nib that writes very well.
Giving money and power to the government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys - P. J. O'Rourke

#9 cambookpro

cambookpro

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 227 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 20 March 2013 - 19:53

I have had the Urban Premium in the chiseled ebony finish since Christmas and while I do like it and use it everyday, there have been some problems.

For one, there is some noticeable wear on the grip where the plastic is no longer shiny, though I'm not sure if this is a common problem or not.
The barrel also has one or two small scuffs on it, but they don't bother me too much.

It is the most expensive pen I own, and I am pleased with it, but yesterday I order a Parker Sonnet in Stainless Steel CT and envisage this as a step up to mid-range pens.
Hopefully it'll wear a bit better than the Urban.

Having said this, don't let the minor wear put you off - IMO, it's still a great pen.

 Parker 75, Ingenuity, Premier, Sonnet, Urban | Pelikan M400 | TWSBI Diamond 580 | Visconti Rembrandt

 

Currently inked: Diamine Apple Glory (Rembrandt), Pelikan 4001 Turquoise (M400), Lamy Black (Diamond 580)







Sponsored Content




|