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Beijing Jinxing 28


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35 replies to this topic

#1 faustulus

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 23:39

I thought I would take a few moments to give my first impression of the Beijing Jinxing 28. I first became aware of the pen after a post on this sight asking for information on it. They listed an ebay site where the vendor was selling NOS 1990s vintage ones. Since I have been in the Chinese pen acquisition mode, I figured I would take a chance. Twenty bucks and nine days later the pen arrived.

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My first thoughts were about how light the pen is. The barrel, and section are made from the same plastic. It feels similar to that used in Heroes or Wing Sungs, if a bit thicker. Does it feel "cheap?" Hard to say, it doesn't feel substantial, but neither do celluloid pens to me. It doesn't seem overly brittle and doesn't crack when you mash it a bit.

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The cap screws to the body and posts securely when writing. The pen disassembles into four parts -- the cap, the body, the section and another piece which joins the barrel and section. (see pics) I am not sure why this fourth section exists since it seems it would be simpler to mold it so the barrel just screwed into the section.
Speaking of the section, it is concave and provides a guide for your fingers -- as long as your fingers fit in the grooves, as mine do, however I can see how it could be a problem for people with larger hands. (my hands aren't what you would call small.)

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compared to Lamy Safari

The filling system is simplicity itself, though what you think of it will depend on your worldview of simple items. It uses a polyurethane sac and you just dip the nib in the ink, squeeze the sac with your fingers and the ink is drawn up the breather tube into the sac. It takes about two squeezes to fill the sac fully. In other words, it works like any button or lever filler only with your fingers instead of a pressure bar. If the sac were to break, it would be a simple matter to replace (looks to be in the 18-20 range)

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With Kailegu 316

As you can see the pen itself has a very elegant look, simple maybe not as refined on close inspection, but elegant. The two metal bands are not quiet flush with the plastic and form a sort of ridge around the cap. You don't see it so much as feel it when you run your fingers over it. Also the ball on the end of the clip, isn't -- a ball that is. The underside is hollow and on my T-shirt it grabbed the clothe and tried to rip it. If I end up using it as a daily writer, I suspect I will fill in the gap with putty to smooth it out.

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Noodler's Ahab and Beijing Jinxing

The jewels on each end are a bit more matte, maybe a satin, in contrast to the high gloss barrel and cap. They are small enough that most won't notice, it just depends on your severity of OCD.

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The nib is probably the best thing about the pen. A two-toned steel affair, it writes between a western fine and medium. It has a touch of feedback, much less than my Auroras, and not so much anyone would call it scratchy. The ink flows nicely and is neither too wet nor too dry. After a 16 hours laying horizontal on the nightstand, I picked it up and began writing right away.
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Size vs Parker 51

So far it has been an excellent pen. As the days go by I will try to update this thread with any other thoughts I have. But initially I can say this is a very nice pen for a good price. One I think I will be using for a while.
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#2 jjlax10

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 00:31

Very nice. Thank you for taking the plunge. I think the piece that connects the section to the barrel is there to prevent glorping as your hand heats up the pen.
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#3 Bluefinntuna

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:49

Looks like a nice pen. I wish it had a converter version. I keep thinking the sac will tear away during filling.

#4 faustulus

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 09:51

Looks like a nice pen. I wish it had a converter version. I keep thinking the sac will tear away during filling.

I wouldn't think more so than a lever or button filler. My Esterbrooks, which I use constantly have never pulled away and if they ever did is a small matter of some shellac to fix them again. I imagine it would be the same with this.
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#5 notimetoulouse

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 13:28

Just throwing my newbie hat into the ring from over here behind the bushes....
I'm back to penning after a serious hand injury led to the loss of use of my right thumb. It was saved, but now it doesn't bend (but I can make mean ring donuts with it.)
Prior to that I sort of prided myself on my handwriting, but since it happened (2 yrs ago) I'd found it too painful to try to grip a pen barrel and write. Consquently my script went downhill, and I became keyboard bound until I found FPN, and asked advice.
To get back into writing again, and without wanting to blow money on a top of the range pen and find out I couldn't use it, I plonked for this - I have to say it - absolutely cracking pen.
I can't add much to this sterling review other than my injury is helped by that big fluted area just above the nib. It's a pure 'digit resting place' and makes the pen so effortless to use.

I have a fine nib on it and it is inked with Monteverde Burgundy. For me, newbie as I am, it's a perfect match, the nib simply glides across my 120gsm journal paper, and I really look forward to using it.

Okay it was probably made in the 80's, been stored in a box somewhere since then, and it's a bit rough around the edges, but to me it's got something about it that makes me want to pick it up and use it every morning.
Silly I know, for a $15 pen, but it's got character.

I've bought quite a few Chinese pens over the past month, and aim to put reviews up on FPN about each one that isn't already commented on, but for now, this big old beauty just continues to make me smile.
And I think the seller is down to his last twenty or thirty and then they will have gone for good.

A good friend of mine, when he knew I wanted to get back into writing, very kindly gave me one of his Pelikan pens with a fine nib.
Wow - a Pelikan as a gift! But....

I've used it twice, this nib beats it hands down for the way it just flows across the page. When I first found FPN I wondered what the phrase 'buttery' meant. Now I know.

Sorry to bang on..I'll get my coat.

I might be old, but at least I got to see all the best Bands.


#6 rwilsonedn

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 21:43

Nice review and great photos. This is one pen that is very hard to describe without pictures.
It is also one of my all-time favorite Chinese pens, and maybe an all-time favorite everyday pens from any country.
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#7 Striated

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 22:26

I just picked up one of these at ebay. The review and the comments here really have me looking forward to it.
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#8 notimetoulouse

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 14:19

I just thought I'd come back a year later and update my thread.

This pen has been a real find, I really enjoy using it, and since last year the nib has become even smoother with use. Both of my Jinxings have chrome fittings, one with a gold coloured nib, and the other a two tone one. I have one inked up with R&K Cassia, and a 26b (same pen - but just a basic sac squeeze filler) filled with Sailor Sei-Boku.

Both of them never miss a beat, and start straight up even after a 3 week rest, they are light and ergonomic (despite their age) and I can write with them all day without fatigue, or without them missing a beat.

So that's two in my collection so far, and I've found a 26a, which has gold fitments as per Faustulus's photo's, which is in the post as I write.

Yes, that's three of them. I can't speak too highly of these pens, you need to take on board that they could have been in storage for up to ten years, but if you take the care to flush with detergent and wash off the nib and feed, they will reward you with real writing pleasure.

In the last year I've kissed a lot of Chinese pen frogs, and the greater majority have just stayed frogs. Of those that changed from a frog into something lovely I can only recommend Jinxing, Duke and Picasso as silky smooth writers straight out of the box.

Hope this helped.


Edited by notimetoulouse, 30 October 2013 - 14:22.

I might be old, but at least I got to see all the best Bands.


#9 rwilsonedn

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 19:07

notime:

Thank you for the update. These "one year later" posts are very rare, but very, very valuable. A lot of pens do love at first sight well, but a pen that settles in for a relationship after the infatuation is gone: that is a treasure.

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#10 notimetoulouse

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 14:10

That's kind of you Ron, thank you. I just need to find a thread about how to take and upload photo's into a topic and I'll be away...I have so many Chinese pens that haven't yet been  reviewed here on FPN.   :thumbup:


I might be old, but at least I got to see all the best Bands.


#11 Rose Nibs

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 12:02

I have quite a few Chinese pens and I have just bought a Jinxing 28 in the hope that this one won't disappoint. Which of the Dukes and Picassos do you recommend? Tell us more. This is the place for 'banging on'.

#12 wuhao

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 03:05

it just 4 bucks in Chinese market

we are accustomed to call jinxing 28 BIG JINXING



#13 Rose Nibs

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 07:11

Time to revive an old thread - the Jinxing 28 absolutely does not disappoint. There are hundreds of Chinese pens but I have stopped searching for the best. This one is good enough. It is reliable, starting every time, no hesitation after sitting idle for a week. It is very comfortable in the hand and has excellent balance, posted or unposted (it is very light). Okay, it's not made of precious resin but the plastic is better than most, the furniture, for once, is understated, and the filling method is the simplest and most fool proof of all - just squeeze the sac. The nib feels like a quality European steel nib with a decent ball of tipping. Can't fault it. Now, where did I buy it, and are there any left, or has notimetoulouse collared them all?



#14 Dickkooty2

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 01:54

A note of agreement on the Jinxing 28. I was packing up four Chinese, three Indians, and two Germans to send to a fellow FPNer who said he would give them a good home, when I found it in the very back of a drawer. I had bought it in November '13 for $15 including postage.

 

It is a remarkable pen: retro European 50's design kind of like  Noodler's Konrad, a nice weight and balance, comfortable grip, good nib and feed. As I think about my Chinese pen experience with giant balls of brass, I am amazed that it actually got made.

 

I rank it with my Jinhao plastic Lamy-style as 'good' on my list. I just mailed off the Chinese ones I didn't think of as 'good'. Who wants a pen where the best you can say is "good for what it is and it sure is cheap".

 

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#15 zdeveric

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 17:51

I am waiting anxiously for my JINXING 28c bought yesterday on ebay (jiangkq2009).

This is much better experience than go to local shop and bring the pen home.



#16 GirchyGirchy

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 13:56

I just ordered some 28s recently and will have to post my opinions once they arrive.  Also got some different nibs, too!



#17 zdeveric

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 15:33

Hello GirchyGirchy,

Looking forward to see your opinion. Where have you found different nibs?



#18 Seele

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 16:13

The steel nibs were made in different finishes and markings, but functionally identical. When the 28 was launched many decades ago, it was in celluloid and a button filler, with 12K gold nib as standard; you can indeed find modern ones with gold nibs, in 12K and 14K, and marking differences too, but they're going to cost you a lot.

 

Golden Star has ceased trading a while ago, which is a bit of a sad thing.


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#19 zdeveric

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 16:39

Thank you, Seele.

Do you know the source where Golden Star with golden nib could one find?



#20 disillusion

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 16:57

The steel nibs were made in different finishes and markings, but functionally identical. When the 28 was launched many decades ago, it was in celluloid and a button filler, with 12K gold nib as standard; you can indeed find modern ones with gold nibs, in 12K and 14K, and marking differences too, but they're going to cost you a lot.

 

Golden Star has ceased trading a while ago, which is a bit of a sad thing.

I found a not-for-sale example of a celluloid Golden Star. Link. Is this what you are talking about?

 

 

Thank you, Seele.

Do you know the source where Golden Star with golden nib could one find?

There is one on Taobao right now for about $58 excluding shipping. At that price you can buy a user grade Parker 51 (or many other vintage 12k pens) if you are patient.


The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. - Richard Feynman

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