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Depository Of Handwriting And Calligraphy Styles and Discussion


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155 replies to this topic

#81 Stompie

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 17:22

Ken, in The Universal Penman, a lot of the flourishes seem to have swells on the up stroke - is that because they are using more than one stroke to complete the letter?

Stompie,

Some, but not all, of the majuscules by J Champion on page 152 of the Universal Penman, are apparently shaded upwards. In fact, these letters were written backwards, so that hairline upstrokes (left to right) become shaded downstrokes (right to left) The letters W and A on this page, are typical examples of the technique.

Ken


Oh, but isn't that like cheating? Especially as I have been trying to work out for hours how they did that on an upstroke! :ltcapd:

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#82 smk

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 17:56

Salman,

Blackletter Variation #73

There are many variations of Blackletter and this is one of the more attractive ones IMO; well-controlled and beautifully written. Certainly, a style worth adopting and copying.

Ken


Thanks Ken. I really like this style. Its easy to learn and the results are usually better than one expects (after one gets the hand of spacing that is :-)

I believe this is a good one to start with for broad edged nib styles since there is very little nib manipulation and one gets a good sense of keeping a consistent nib angle. Its good preparation for more difficult styles and a worthy hand to learn in its own right.

Salman

#83 kenfraser

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 21:44

I believe this is a good one to start with for broad edged nib styles since there is very little nib manipulation and one gets a good sense of keeping a consistent nib angle. Its good preparation for more difficult styles and a worthy hand to learn in its own right.


I agree.

#84 pen2paper

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 22:06

Thanks for both the invaluable thread, and addition of clickable links to reference previous pages.

I must have spent some time with a Kaufman-based tutorial some long time ago, as there are clear similarities in my own handwriting, though I tend to break some of the connectors. Now I will have a model to follow so that I may be able to add more balance to the overall appearance.

emoticon-animal-007.gif~Hi! fountain pen enthusiast here~


#85 kenfraser

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 14:12

Spencerian Ladies Hand #85

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#86 kenfraser

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 14:13

This style, with minimal shading, was originally written with a straight penholder. As such, it is well suited to being written with a fountain pen with a moderately flexible nib. I wrote this, and the alphabet, with my Namiki Falcon.
The shading can follow the pattern of shading in Spencerian, or omitted altogether, or as in this example it can be used on all downstrokes, as in Roundhand aka Copperplate.
The most obvious characteristic is in the extended ascenders and descenders. This, combined with modest shading, gives the lettering a light, elegant look which no doubt accounts for the name 'Ladies Hand'. It can, of course, be written with as much pleasure, by either sex.

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Edited by caliken, 27 July 2012 - 07:46.


#87 jeremiah.l.burns

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 13:46

Tengwar #87

I've made some minor corrections to Tengwar (Consonants)-#87. However, as I can no longer edit the original post, I'm including them here. It might well be worth a moderator updating the original post and deleting this one to avoid confusion.

Also included in this new post are the vowels, so the old post should probably be renamed here (and in the Index) as Tengwar - #87 ... simply as a houskeeping measure.

In any event, the new consonant and vowel tables are below:

Posted Image

Posted Image


Notes (per Dan Smith's tutorials):
1) In Quenya, the a sound occurs so frequently, that its symbol (three dots) is can be simplified (to look like a circumflex), or
if no confusion would occur, eliminated altogether.
2) The one published Quenya Tengwar inscription by Tolkien used the acute accent mark for the e sound and the single dot
for the i sound, but Tolkien also stated that the reverse could be equally valid.
3) Long vowels have the same sound as short vowels, the only difference is the duration of the sound. For example: the
'short u' is as in brute, while the 'long u' is as in cool.

Edited by smk, 03 August 2012 - 20:47.
Per request of original poster.


#88 smk

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 23:21

Tengwar (Consonants) #87

jeremiah.l.burns - that's an interesting addition. It would be nice to see this script written by hand - do you have any examples to share?

Regards,
Salman

Edit: Added reference to the hand in question.

Edited by smk, 29 July 2012 - 10:27.


#89 fiberdrunk

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 00:17

I love this thread! Thanks for posting so many beautiful models!
Find my homemade ink recipes on my Flickr page here.

"I don't wait for inspiration; inspiration waits for me." --Akiane Kramarik

#90 N2theBreach

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 00:56

Business Writing #42

Riight you are that business writing is very familiar to Yanks. I was taught cursive in 1962(?) and this is essentially the script we used. The only (minor) difference that my untrained eyes can see is the lower-case "o." I think we were taught to make a small loop as we completed the oval and began the connecting line to the next letter, as it is in the uppercase. Or, maybe I've just done it that way for so long that my mind is playing games with me.

You said it makes a nice everyday hand--I'm glad to hear you say that. It's the hand that I'm working towards, going back to, whatever the right phraseology is in this case. I have the basics, of course, I'm trying to work on consistency.

#91 jeremiah.l.burns

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 09:12

jeremiah.l.burns - that's an interesting addition. It would be nice to see this script written by hand - do you have any examples to share?

Regards,
Salman

I do indeed. Not very good, mind you as I'm quite new to writing by hand with calligraphy/fountain pens. But I'll get something up today!

I'm also whipping up a companion chart for the tehtar...the diacritic vowels.

-Jerry

Edited by jeremiah.l.burns, 29 July 2012 - 09:12.


#92 jeremiah.l.burns

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 21:08

Tengwar (Consonants) #87

jeremiah.l.burns - that's an interesting addition. It would be nice to see this script written by hand - do you have any examples to share?

Regards,
Salman

Edit: Added reference to the hand in question.

As requested. Again, not very good. Something I worked on last week where I was practising the hand, and another where I tried writing something....which din't turn out as well as I'd hoped. It's a very shaky hand and rather blobby.

But the point of the exercise I suppose was to show an example of it written...not perfection. For perfection, look elsewhere or perhaps check back with me in 12 months. ;-)

Incidentally, the second image says "the sun shall shine on your path". Thanks to Quenya101 for the translation.

Edit: I'm also not sure I got the translation transcribed correctly! Never mind.

ECE40D17-1917-4A42-B560-6903AA848163.JPG
IMG_4739.JPG

Edited by jeremiah.l.burns, 29 July 2012 - 21:12.


#93 kenfraser

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 10:09

Elicit #93

This version of the Elicit font was handwritten with Rotring Artpens.

Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by caliken, 01 August 2012 - 10:14.


#94 tdzb36

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 00:30

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2 Hi caliken,I visited your web site,I saw a picture of Penmanship is very beautiful,Please ask me How this font to write?Is it need special tools to finish it?

needle-stitch-script.jpg

#95 waterproof

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 04:59

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2 Hi caliken,I visited your web site,I saw a picture of Penmanship is very beautiful,Please ask me How this font to write?Is it need special tools to finish it?

needle-stitch-script.jpg

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture). Only a flexible pen is needed.Following the basic principle of executing Copperplate, and "break" the letter at about an half of the X-height,you can also do this.


For more information about this style,visit IAMPETH at
http://www.iampeth.c...e_I_page24.html

or to see this video by Dr.Joe Vitolo:
http://www.iampeth.c...itch_script.htm

#96 kenfraser

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 12:20

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture).

Needle-Stich script is modified English Roundhand (Copperplate). In Joe Vitolo's case, it is modified Engraver's script.

It has nothing to do with Spencerian script which is entirely different.

Ken

Edited by caliken, 03 August 2012 - 12:21.


#97 waterproof

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 16:08

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture).

Needle-Stich script is modified English Roundhand (Copperplate). In Joe Vitolo's case, it is modified Engraver's script.

It has nothing to do with Spencerian script which is entirely different.

Ken


Maybe you are wrong this time,Ken.I recommend you to have a look at WHAT I had posted above:http://www.iampeth.com/books/sull_volume_I/sull_volume_I_page24.html
And you will see the sentence which reads"A form of Spencerian in which short interrupted dashes of shading are added to a unweighted script...."
So, you can't say that it has nothing to do with Spencerian.

#98 Mickey

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 16:54

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture).

Needle-Stich script is modified English Roundhand (Copperplate). In Joe Vitolo's case, it is modified Engraver's script.

It has nothing to do with Spencerian script which is entirely different.

Ken


Maybe you are wrong this time,Ken.I recommend you to have a look at WHAT I had posted above:http://www.iampeth.com/books/sull_volume_I/sull_volume_I_page24.html
And you will see the sentence which reads"A form of Spencerian in which short interrupted dashes of shading are added to a unweighted script...."
So, you can't say that it has nothing to do with Spencerian.


I would say it has to do with neither, exclusively, but is rather a process which can be applied to any shaded hand. The example you posted, is, as Ken correctly points out, based on Copperplate, whereas the example on the page you cited is Spencerian.

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. (4 Bl. Com. 151, 152.) Blackstone's Commentaries


#99 kenfraser

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 22:59

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2 Hi caliken,I visited your web site,I saw a picture of Penmanship is very beautiful,Please ask me How this font to write?Is it need special tools to finish it?

needle-stitch-script.jpg

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture).


The style of script as shown in the picture, is Copperplate (English Roundhand) written as 'Needle Stitch Script'.

I should know - I wrote it!

There may well be other versions of 'Needle Stitch Script' but your example by Joe Vitolo is in Engravers Script.

Ken

Edited by caliken, 04 August 2012 - 23:16.


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Posted 05 August 2012 - 02:24

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2 Hi caliken,I visited your web site,I saw a picture of Penmanship is very beautiful,Please ask me How this font to write?Is it need special tools to finish it?

needle-stitch-script.jpg

This style of Copperplate(or more exactly,Spencerian) is called the "Needle Stitch Script"(as showed in the picture).


The style of script as shown in the picture, is Copperplate (English Roundhand) written as 'Needle Stitch Script'.

I should know - I wrote it!

There may well be other versions of 'Needle Stitch Script' but your example by Joe Vitolo is in Engravers Script.

Ken


Sorry maybe you misunderstood me.
Your piece of Needle Stitch Script is based on English Roundhand,and Joe Vitolo's is in Engraver's Script, those are right, and I think I didn't say words denying these facts.What I want to tell is that from the very beginning, NSS is used to described the special style of Spencerian originated by past master Francis B. Courtney.
So when you said NSS has nothing to do with Spencerian, I really can't agree with you.
Can these explainations help?






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