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Depository Of Handwriting And Calligraphy Styles and Discussion


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153 replies to this topic

#1 kenfraser

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 20:56

As the Penmanship sub-forum has grown over the years, so the wealth of information concerning the
various styles of hand lettering has expanded. Unfortunately, this information is scattered all
over the place and finding a particular lettering style to copy or study, has become very difficult.
The instigation of this ‘depository’ is an attempt to collect some of this information together and
to make it available in one easily accessible place.

If posters of exemplars follow this procedure, I believe that everyone will benefit.

If you intend to participate in this sub-forum (and hopefully you will) please take a couple of
minutes to read the following, in particular sections 1) and 2)

1) Original ‘exemplar’ posts to be structured, as follows :-

Each exemplar should consist of the title, the full alphabet comprising all the capitals, small letters and
numerals (if possible) and that’s all. The letters and numbers on the exemplar should be
reasonably large (certainly larger than normal handwriting) for easier examination and study.
The reason for the restriction on the content of the exemplar post, is so that it remains uncluttered and can be located easily by the post number which is conveniently supplied by FPN and is shown in the top right hand corner.

2) Each style must have a distinctive name, or be given a title, for future reference. If the style
is a variation of a previously posted style, say ‘Italic’ for example, the new exemplar could be
called ‘Pointed Italic’ or named for the post number ‘Italic #53' or named after the poster e.g.
‘John’s Italic’. These are just suggestions. As long as the name is unique and easily located.
If the post number (shown in the top right corner) is incorporated, this will provide the quickest
way to find a particular exemplar.
_____________________________

Once the thread is established, the beginner could be directed straight to the ‘depository’
thereby avoiding a great deal of time-wasting duplication of information.

The posting of alphabets by participants needn’t be in their own hand. Unless copyright is a
problem, any source material will be fine. The purpose is to make as many choices available as
possible.

If alternative letters or numbers for a particular style become available, they could be posted with
reference to the original posting number and style title, to which they relate. As mentioned earlier,
FPN postings are already numbered.

There’s no reason why a participant shouldn’t post an alphabet of their own creation - as
long as it’s named and complete.

--- Index of Exemplars started by WestLothian ---

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2

Italic #4

Uncial #13

Marking alphabet #15

Spencerian #18

 

Blackletter Rotunda #30

Gothic Batarde #35

Handwritten Kaufmann #39

Business Writing #42

Handwritten Clerestory #45

Foundational Hand #60

Zapf Italic #71

Blackletter Variation #73

Spencerian Ladies Hand #85

Tengwar #87

Elicit #93

Niccolo Niccoli's Formal Script #103

French Roundhand - Ronde #107

Gotica Moderna ("Modern Gothic") #110

Neugebauer's Fraktur Script #111

Coulée #120

François (or Français) and Bâtard #124


Edited by Ken Fraser, 28 March 2014 - 14:56.


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#2 kenfraser

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 21:14

English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2
Posted Image

#3 kenfraser

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 21:17

The version of English Roundhand (Copperplate) #2 derives from 18th century exemplars. It was written with a Gillott 303 flexible dip nib in an oblique holder. The ink was Higgins Eternal and the paper was Mondi IQ Selection 100gsm. It was written at a slope angle of 55 degrees from the horizontal.

There are many references to this style of lettering throughout FPN. Of particular interest is the ‘Learning Copperplate' topic. Also, there is comprehensive study of the drawn version of this style known as Engravers or Engrossers script with videos, on www.iampeth.com.
Here's an example of the alphabet in post #2 in action.
Note the straight ascenders (no loops) on 'h' and 'l' . This is optional. Also, the capital letter 'W' is totally different from the one in the exemplar. There are many variations of the capitals in this script.

Posted Image

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 05:58.


#4 kenfraser

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 21:51

Italic #4
Posted Image

Edited by caliken, 10 July 2012 - 10:35.


#5 kenfraser

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:45

The version of Italic #4 is the basic formal style and is only one of many variations. It was written at a slope angle of 8 degrees from the horizontal with a Rotring Artpen fitted with an edged nib.

It is very suitable for use as everyday handwriting as it can be written very fast without breaklng down and becoming illegible.

Posted Image

Although it was written at a moderate speed, this sample shows its use as everyday handwriting. It was written with a Manuscript fountain pen fitted with a fine, edged nib and has been enlarged here, by about 50% to give a clear image. Search for HDoug, Italicist, Ann Finley and many others for fine examples of Cursive (joined-up) Italic handwriting throughout FPN. For instructions as to its construction, look at the top of the Penmanship forum, under "Chancery Italic Script Instructions"

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 05:58.


#6 kenfraser

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 12:22

Following on from the launch of the 'Depository of Handwriting and Calligraphy Styles' Topic on 9th July 2012, please post here, any comments or questions you may have concerning any of the material in the 'Despository'.

It would help if you can give the title of the exemplar and the post number (top right corner).

Ken

Edited by caliken, 11 July 2012 - 08:52.


#7 HDoug

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 21:10

I really like the very clear and essential form of italic #4! I notice subtle entry strokes starting the ascenders in the alphabet example,
Posted Image

and straight ascenders in the joined sample:
Posted Image

It makes sense, of course, in quick everyday writing to write the descender with a quick downstroke.

I do have a question though. Double oʻs. Ligatured or not, and if so how? I used to make double oʻs by making a bar straight across from one o to the other, but that fat graphic element didnʻt look quite right. I seem to recall historic examples maintain balance by using a thinner diagonal ligature. Iʻve just been omitting most double o ligatures.

Any suggestions for double o ligatures for this model of clarity?

Doug

Edited by HDoug, 10 July 2012 - 21:11.


#8 kenfraser

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 22:05

Double oʻs. Ligatured or not, and if so how? I used to make double oʻs by making a bar straight across from one o to the other, but that fat graphic element didnʻt look quite right. I seem to recall historic examples maintain balance by using a thinner diagonal ligature. Iʻve just been omitting most double o ligatures.

Any suggestions for double o ligatures for this model of clarity?

Doug



Doug,

Thanks for your comments.

I usually double o ligature, straight across, and I think that it looks OK. Twisting the hand narrows the stroke, but this isn't practical in normal handwriting.
I just did a little experiment and discovered that, when writing at speed, I sometime ligature across but with a slight dip. I've no idea why, it's just a habit I seem to have developed.
Also, I occasionally don't ligature at all - and again, I don't know why!

Thanks for using the system of quoting the post number of the exemplar. :)

Ken

#9 katim

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 10:45

I think this is a splendid source of useful information, Ken, and one that should prove invaluable to all the members of this particular forum for many years to come. And to me that suggests that it should be 'pinned' in the top section of the list of topics, where it will always be available and not getting lost in the welter of other topics as the days go by. Thank you for the post - it contains both information and beauty and is a pleasure to look at!

#10 kenfraser

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 11:24

I think this is a splendid source of useful information, Ken, and one that should prove invaluable to all the members of this particular forum for many years to come. And to me that suggests that it should be 'pinned' in the top section of the list of topics, where it will always be available and not getting lost in the welter of other topics as the days go by. Thank you for the post - it contains both information and beauty and is a pleasure to look at!

Ken,

The point you make, had occurred to me, too.

As this thread becomes esablished as the discussion area for the the master Topic, there is a problem. The original topic will remain ''clean' of all but the exemplars, (which is great), but as there are no intermediate postings, it will rapidly slip down off the current page and out of sight, rarely to be seen again!
Other than constantly 'bumping' it, (far from ideal) I agree that the obvious solution would be 'pinning' where it is always easily available, but this is a decision beyond the normal membership.

Thanks for your comments and support, Ken.

#11 Stompie

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 17:53

Maybe a stupid question but on the Roundhand - is the capital Q complete?
Posted Image
Courtesy Prvt. Toter: Posted Image Posted Image

#12 kenfraser

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 20:34

Maybe a stupid question but on the Roundhand - is the capital Q complete?

It's not a stupid question; it does look a bit strange today, but that is the early version of the letter. It does look like the numeral 2, and for that reason, I sometimes use the letter O with a short tail.

Ken

#13 kenfraser

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 21:15

Uncial #13

Posted Image

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 09:22.


#14 kenfraser

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 21:34

Posted Image

Uncial #6

Whilst this script is too slow for everyday handwriting, it is very effective as a style for letter writing where time isn't such an issue.

The letters are written wide and spaced close together.

The exemplar was written with a Rotring Artpen fitted with an edged nib, as was this little text example.

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 06:01.


#15 Columba Livia

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 12:59

Marking Alphabet for the pointed pen:

Posted Image

Source of this example:

http://archive.org/s...e/n291/mode/1up

#16 Columba Livia

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 12:59

Marking alphabets such as this were used in the 19th and early 20th century for headers, titles, adressing parcels and packages, labelling and suchlike.

Some examples of still-in-manufacture pens suitable for this type of lettering would be the Hunt 101, Gillott 303, Brause Rose, Gillott 170, Leonardt Principle and the Leonardt Shorthand DP40.

Posted Image

Source:

http://archive.org/s...age/12/mode/1up

Further examples and instructions:

http://www.iampeth.c...hip_page77.html
-
http://www.iampeth.c...nt_page104.html
-
http://www.iampeth.c...hod_page70.html
-
http://archive.org/s...age/88/mode/1up

Edited by Columba Livia, 13 July 2012 - 13:06.


#17 kenfraser

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 13:23

Columba Livia,

Marking Alphabet (post #8)

Thanks for posting this unusual and distinctive alphabet.

Ken

Edited by caliken, 13 July 2012 - 13:24.


#18 kenfraser

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 13:26

Spencerian #18

Posted Image

Edited by HDoug, 19 July 2012 - 09:22.


#19 kenfraser

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 13:32

Spencerian Script was devised by Platt R Spencer after whom it was named.
For extensive information on the style, go to www.iampeth .com

Post #10 was written with a Hunt 101 nib in an oblique holder with Iron Gall ink.
This example was written with Higgins Eternal ink. The image has been enlarged for clarity.

Posted Image

Edited by caliken, 13 July 2012 - 13:45.


#20 rodrigaj

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 13:35

Maybe a stupid question but on the Roundhand - is the capital Q complete?

It's not a stupid question; it does look a bit strange today, but that is the early version of the letter. It does look like the numeral 2, and for that reason, I sometimes use the letter O with a short tail.

Ken


That was the version that I learned in the late 50's and early 60's with the Palmer Method.






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