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Bbc Article About Rising Fountain Pen Sales


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#21 SheWrites

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 09:29

Look, we're trendy.

Why are fountain pen sales rising? - BBC News

(-:


Thanks for posting the link, it was interesting. It's just a pity that penmanship is not also on the rise...

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#22 PR Wright

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 13:57

I grew up using fountain pens but left them. What drove me back to them is hearing a couple of young mothers saying that children were no longer taught cursive writing and that their children can no more read it than they could read a foreign language.

#23 chifeuse

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 00:44

As a museum curator, everything that is shared with our visitors, both on site and online, has been written, corrected, written again and again with one of my fountain pens until it is ready to be retranscripted to a computer... A perfect combination for me ! :-)

#24 Ricky2011

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 14:55

Yes

I too enjoyed this article on Fountain pens

wonder what effect this will have on the sales of Ballpoint and rollerball pens
Are they now seen as second best, cheap throw away like BIC.

only time will tell i guess

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#25 iamchum

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 15:11

Im glad the article spoke about FPs in such a positive light and not simply as some fuddy duddy museum piece. It reminds me of the thoughts that went through my mind when I first got into FPs. They were a writing tool that best fit my needs, now they are what's best about my writing experience (that and nice stationary). It's true what neil gaiman said about thought process. I find, on a computer screen, too often I spend countless hours deleting, retyping and then re-deleting sentences, when, while writing with an FP, I am forced to crystallize my thoughts, and I am helped by the fact that I can see all the crossed out words that trace that crystallization process.

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#26 LedZepGirl

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 05:51

I haven't even bothered to read all the comments, but the ones reposted here...Posted Image Posted Image

Obese people- I'm far from it. People walking around with sharp pointed objects in their pockets- your ball point would do more damage than a soft 14k nib, which would crumple if you tried to stab someone with it. Modern tech person- just give your kid a smart phone and watch them become one more little techno junkie (we all know the type, five year old so focused on playing cellphone games they would walk into traffic if a parent weren't holding them back).

Some people have way too much time on their hands.
I'd rather spend my money on pens instead of shoes and handbags.

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#27 Treecat

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 15:01

Thanks for posting the link, it was interesting. It's just a pity that penmanship is not also on the rise...


My niece sent me a handwritten thank you note for a birthday gift. It was nice to get a handwritten note from her, but she's 11 years old and it was sad to see that her block print resembled a five or six year old's handwriting. She does everything on computer or iPad.

#28 m0rr1s

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 17:29

I am afraid to say Treecat, that my students tend to rush for their Ipads before any type of pen. What will they do if their 'machines' run out of power?When I started teaching, all students had to write with a FP. Luckily, a few do, but it is a drindling number. I have noticed a decline in their handwritting. Too much is close to illegible!

Saying that, more and more of my collagues are using FPs.I hope this, and the BBC article, will have a positive influence on a future generation.

#29 welch

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 22:18

I am afraid to say Treecat, that my students tend to rush for their Ipads before any type of pen. What will they do if their 'machines' run out of power?When I started teaching, all students had to write with a FP. Luckily, a few do, but it is a drindling number. I have noticed a decline in their handwritting. Too much is close to illegible!

Saying that, more and more of my collagues are using FPs.I hope this, and the BBC article, will have a positive influence on a future generation.


My children were not taught cursive writing. By the mid '90s, US schools assumed that every student would write papers with a word-processing program. My own handwriting disintegrated as I began to use a mouse, so I blame Windows 95. However, I still take notes by hand, using a fountain pen for words and a pencil when I'm drawing designs. That feels like the right balance.

We see that the fountain pen has outlasted the typewriter, and I think it has outlasted the high-quality / high-priced ballpoint for which someone would buy refills. There are throw-away ballpoints, and the BiC Crystal is still around, but Papermate is the name of Sanford's rubber-gripped Buy-em-by-the-box ballpoints.

Further, I do not allow my team to bring a laptop to a meeting, or to open any sort of PDA. If we meet, I want everyone to pay attention. My wife teaches social work grad students, and refuses to allow anyone to use a laptop during class, unless they have a letter from the disability office.

Nothing replaces the ability to write...there are so many places and situations that don't fit an iPad or glorified Blackberry. The sight of a couple at dinner: ignoring each other as they thumb away on iThings...odd.

(Ah...if only I could write legibly, though!!)



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#30 Sherwood Forester

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 14:47

The sight of a couple at dinner: ignoring each other as they thumb away on iThings...odd.


It happens over there, too, does it? Whenever I see that, which is sadly quite common these days, I wonder if they are texting each other instead of chatting. What am I missing out on? They seem to have such interesting, fulfilling, loving and devoted relationships.

Have you noticed also that in a group of friends out together, at least one will have their phone in hand or put it on the table and glance at it occasionally as if hoping someone else more interesting than the present company will make contact?


(By the way, do you know how to keep a kid from talking?

Just tape it's thumbs to it's index fingers.) :P

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#31 Shaughn

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 21:30

I'm inclined to think that handwriting and books (real books, not e-books) are doomed to become luxuries for the happy few.

Oh well... in the mean time, let's snob the simple peasants who cannot write a legible cursive, or have an ebook reader. Poor uncultivated things, too physically impaired for handling delicate and fragile paper pages or exquisite writing instruments.

Eh?

#32 Scrawler

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 21:41

I'm inclined to think that handwriting and books (real books, not e-books) are doomed to become luxuries for the happy few.

Oh well... in the mean time, let's snob the simple peasants who cannot write a legible cursive, or have an ebook reader. Poor uncultivated things, too physically impaired for handling delicate and fragile paper pages or exquisite writing instruments.

Eh?

There are companies that will not employ people who cannot read and write well. I know of a company that has a hand written test before they give a formal interview. The applicant must use their own pen to write dictated sentence that include words like "your", "you're", "their", "there", "they're". Any mistake and the applicant does not get the interview.

#33 Sherwood Forester

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 13:08

There are companies that will not employ people who cannot read and write well. I know of a company that has a hand written test before they give a formal interview. The applicant must use their own pen to write dictated sentence that include words like "your", "you're", "their", "there", "they're". Any mistake and the applicant does not get the interview.


What a great idea! If only it could become the normal procedure everywhere. (Did it used to be the case in times past?) One spin-off might be an improvement in the standard of English attained by school-leavers. Some of the young people I know personally are oblivious to the different meanings and spellings of words which sound the same as each other, such as the examples you gave. Another widespread abomination is the use in conversation of "somethink", "anythink" and nothink" instead of the correct words. I have wondered if the people who use the corrupted versions also write them down in the same form.

Schools would have a great incentive to concentrate more on the "basics" if employers insisted on applicants being reasonably literate (and also numerate!)

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#34 Sherwood Forester

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 13:17

Incidentally, Brianetta, that's a heck of a view you've got from your patio/balcony/terrace/window ;)

S.F.

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#35 iamchum

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 13:34

Another widespread abomination is the use in conversation of "somethink", "anythink" and nothink" instead of the correct words. I have wondered if the people who use the corrupted versions also write them down in the same form.
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I just laughed so hard hahaahahahaa.

Visions of Vicky Pollard from Little Britain just popped into my head.

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#36 Marco Polo Pen Company

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:28

A very interesting article - thanks for sharing.

#37 bbbiswas

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 07:35

Interesting reading. Thank you for the link



I did not get any clarity on the REAL reason for rise in sales of fountain pens from the article.

But I believe the fountain pens sale to

(1) Real lovers of handwriting
(2) Haters of ballpoint pens after their finger pain experience
(3) Rich people for whom it is a symbol of their affluence. FPs cost a fortune.
(4) Lazy people in office who don't have to write much in a day in office
(5) People who don't sign for multiple copies using carbon paper

The marketing people have really cajoled buyers through internet, emails etc.
Advertising should get the credit for rise in FP sales.
Even the BBC article is an advertisement for PARKER showing a Parker nib at the start of the article. It should have shown an anonymous nib. The atonement by showing other pens later is only a trick to show neutrality.




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