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Help Me Decide Between Two Totally Different Pens


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#21 Calbei

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 08:59

The Lamy 2000. Personally I think the standard VP looks clunky and ugly. The Decimo looks far better but doesn't come in black. :crybaby:

Try and get your hands on both of them (2000 and VP) to see which you prefer.

#22 XiaoMG

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 10:43

The Lamy 2000. Personally I think the standard VP looks clunky and ugly. The Decimo looks far better but doesn't come in black. :crybaby:


The 2012 colors of the Decimo include gloss black. No matte black or cool texture, but black is available.
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#23 Laura N

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 13:32

I would vote for the 2000. I love both pens, and you can't go wrong either way. I do personally use the Lamy 2000 more. The Vanishing Points are more fun pens, for me, with a great look and fun colors. For me, the 2000 is better suited for long writing. I don't know if it's slightly lighter, or if the weight is just more balanced, but it feels better in my hand for long writing sessions. It also has a very large ink capacity.

One of my 2000s has a fine nib, and it's the smoothest fine nib I've personally used in a modern pen. I can't get it to run out of ink, either. :) I don't even like fine points anymore, but I like that one. I can't compare the VP's fine nib, because I only have broad and medium nibs for my VPs. I do think the medium nib VP is particularly nice.

I agree that eventually you should get both. :)

#24 Vshin

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 14:07

I have both pens (as well as the Sheaffer Prelude) and I can break this down very simply for you:

You will want the VP for frequent note-taking. Capping/re-capping gets very tiresome and leaving the pen uncapped will cause startup issues because of dry nibs. You might have reservations about the clip but I can tell you from first-hand experience the capping issue will only get worse with time. Cartridges are also much more convenient when you need to fill in the field and Pilot cartridges are relatively inexpensive (12 for $4). I would recommend the 2000 for those who write less frequently and/or for longer continuous periods.
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#25 januaryman

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 14:41

I'm not ruling out a TWSBI at some time in the future, but I'm NOT interested in one in the least bit for this particular purchase.

To be blunt, I don't want a demonstrator and I don't want a pen that can't be posted.


Not trying to irk you, but I post my TWSBI with no issues. Just have to be careful. And if you get a Smoke demonstrator, it's less demonstrator and more smoke.
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#26 Ernst Bitterman

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 15:01

I've got both, strangely enough. The Lamy is lighter by far (a plus in my books) and has at least double the reserve the VP offers. The VP is super-convenient. There's little to choose in terms of writing, although I think the Lamy has a little more spring to it. The Lamy isn't VERY susceptible to dry-out, and the cap is such a tactile pleasure to re-attach frequent cycles of that sort might actually be a good thing. The VP's trap-door needs cleaning now and again, a process which is somewhat shrouded in mystery ("Is it clean now? How about now?"). The clicking noises made by the VP's mechanism are more pronounced than the Lamy's cap-grabber. Both call for more than usual care in finger placement, but with a little flexibility neither is obnoxious.

The criteria I think you would be well to focus on are the balancing of capacity vs. dry-out time and which one appeals to your tastes more.

Edited by Ernst Bitterman, 27 March 2012 - 15:02.

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#27 dspeers58

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 15:55

I have a VP fine point and it is always with me. Great pen, sips ink and love the fact that it is retractable. I also have the Lamy 2000 fine point, but do not like it as much as the VP. The nib on MY Lamy is not as good as the VP, smaller sweet spot, somewhat frustrating and so I would go for the VP.

#28 sbruno33

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 16:53

I have three VPs and two 2000s. Carry one of each with me every day. Both are great writers. If you are writing copious amounts during the average day, might want to lean toward the 2000, the VP doesn't have the largest ink capacity. The 2000 is a bit stiff though, as opposed to the writing experience with the VP equipped with one of Richard Binder's soft writing, cursive italics; which is, sublime. Or, flip a coin.
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#29 Amandaa

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 17:03

My vote's for the VP. I don't own a 2000, but I love my VP. I thought the clip placement would bother me because I hold my pens very low and strange, but I'm fine with it. You would also be able to easily change nib units if you wished.

#30 bunnspecial

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 17:00

Alright-to follow up on this one.

I tried them both out locally, and ended up with the 2000 because I just liked how it felt in my hand better.

The store was running a pretty good sale on pens and inks, and I ended up with it for $128(I also picked up a bottle of Edelstein Sapphire for $13.60). So far, I'm really, really happy with how it writes and overall happy with the pen. I can see why it's considered such a classic.

I should also add that I chose the medium, which is(I think) just about right. From a quick comparison, it seems to be a shade wider than a Safari medium and about the same as a 14K Studio Fine.

#31 Angry__Panda

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 17:20

I'd vote the 2000. It is one of my favorite pens (though I haven't been using it because I have started writing super small and the medium nib I have gets in the way of that). It is a much softer writer than the Lamy pens you own right now. The nib is one of the best parts IMHO, very smooth (though again my medium nib has some issues like shading and what not with some of my inks). Also, it is not a screw cap so that helps the frequent capping and uncapping. I also don't post mine, but it does post well (100% better than the TWSBI's heh). I would also suggest getting one sooner rather than later, I read an article (can't remember where) that said they were "redesigning" the 2000's and their price was more than doubling. For 150 I think it is one of the better values out there (keep in mind I have been looking around at pens closer to the 500-800 dollar range so 150 is practically free lol).

#32 vrgelinas

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 17:30

I didn't used to like hooded nibs, but they've grown on me because I mark things off check lists a lot at work and it helps to have a pen that doesn't dry.

For a good all-around writer, I would get a Waterman Phileas. Smooth, classy, and understated.

#33 Uncle Red

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 19:41

Alright-to follow up on this one.

I tried them both out locally, and ended up with the 2000 because I just liked how it felt in my hand better.

The store was running a pretty good sale on pens and inks, and I ended up with it for $128(I also picked up a bottle of Edelstein Sapphire for $13.60). So far, I'm really, really happy with how it writes and overall happy with the pen. I can see why it's considered such a classic.

I should also add that I chose the medium, which is(I think) just about right. From a quick comparison, it seems to be a shade wider than a Safari medium and about the same as a 14K Studio Fine.

Congrats, I hope you enjoy it for many years to come. Can I assume you passed everything then?

#34 Brooks803

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 20:01

I'll add my .02 for the vanishing point. I just bought one for myself this past weekend and it's an awesome pen!

Oops...guess I should have read through more posts! Didn't see that you already made your choice :headsmack:

Do enjoy your new purchase!

Edited by Brooks803, 17 April 2012 - 20:05.