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Two Worcester Pens Celluloid Sentinels


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7 replies to this topic

#1 rogerb

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 00:37

Following my review of a Worcester Pens Spencer, which I mis-identified as a Sentinel, I have bought two real Sentinels, from their maker Bryan Lucas.

Both are celluloid; the first is a very pretty dusky 'Rose Quartz' colour and gold trim, with an 18K Jowo nib, made into a 0.7-0.8 cursive italic by Oxonian; the other has silver trim and is in the same colour, Steel Quartz, used by Waterman in the 1930s. (I had a W'man 94 in this striking material, but didn't like the nib, so it has a new owner). This has a round-tipped Medium steel nib, also nicely smoothed by Oxonian.

The Rose Quartz is 2mm shorter and thinner than the Steel Quartz, which is 15cm capped ..slightly longer than a MB149.
Bryan tells me that the pink celluloid stock was thinner, so he could not make it any bigger. Both are very comfortable to use unposted, quite light, but they feel substantial, and have, as always, Worcester's excellent fit and finish.
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The celluloid maybe doesn't have the depth of colour of some of the best Italian pens ... which cost much more .... but both pens have been much-admired.
Packaging is tastefully simple .... a smallish box in a cardboard sleeve. I personally am rather irritated by huge, ornate boxes.

One tiny criticism is that the cap-to-body threads are not as slick as they could be, and one has to take some care not to cross-thread when capping.
Bryan is aware of this and is working on it! It really is not a big issue.

The Jowo 18K gold duo-colour CI nib is wet and writes very nicely, with line-width variation, and just a bit more suppleness than the very smooth, wet, steel M nib. Both feel very comfortable in my hand; I just prefer the slightly fatter, longer grey pen.

The filling systems are C/C , about which there isn't much more to say!

These pens were on sale at the pen shows for GBP79 with steel nibs .... amazing value, IMO.
I'm not sure how much extra I paid for the gold nib, as I got it from Oxonian, as part of a package deal, but in any case it is extremely competitive.

These are great pens, and Bryan was, as always, a delight to deal with.

Edited by rogerb, 29 February 2012 - 01:44.

If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you; But if you really make them think, they'll hate you. Don Marquis US humorist (1878 - 1937)

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#2 richardandtracy

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 09:30

I love the colour of the red one and would probably have bought one at LWES 2011 had Bryan been able to get there.

However, I'm still in two minds about the barrel shape. The constant taper doesn't look like one (despite holding a ruler up to the screen & seeingthat it is really straight), almost as if there is a bulge and waist midway - most 'apparent' on the red one.

The pens look slender & light, designed for all day use, is that the case? What are the diameters? And do the different section shapes make much difference to the feel?

They do look lovely & thanks for letting us share in them a little.

Regards,

Richard.




#3 rogerb

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 02:31

Hi Richard
They are light(not ultralight) and, IMO quite suitable for all-day use. I had not even noticed the different sections!
I have no problems, either, with the step at the cap-threads: it is not at all sharp or uncomfortable. I imagine that some, especially those who grip quite far from the nib, might not like this.
The barrel taper does not have a bulge, as far as I can see.... this seems to be an optical illusion! The taper does not begin immediately....there is a short parallel portion near the threads...this may contribute to the illusion of a 'bulge'.
I don't have very suitable tools for measuring the diameter, but the grey one is about 12mm at its thickest, with the other less than a mm thinner. Bryan would give you accurate figures, I'm sure.
The cap is about 15mm diameter.
I didn't mention that there is a small round metal plate in the end of the cap, bearing what I assume is the Worcester Pens logo, a black pear (which also, incidentally appears on the Worcestershire County flag)! The county is famous for its fruit production, the Black Pear is now a rare variety :)

I hope this helps.

Edited by rogerb, 01 March 2012 - 02:32.

If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you; But if you really make them think, they'll hate you. Don Marquis US humorist (1878 - 1937)

#4 richardandtracy

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:43

The black pear explains why the engraving on the clip has disappeared. I had wondered.

Thanks for that clarification Roger. Hope you continue to enjoy them.

Regards,

Richard.

#5 hari317

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:36

Roger, are these pens made of Nitrocellulose(Camphor smell) or cellulose acetate?
Thanks!
Hari
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#6 rogerb

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:18

I did not ask, Hari .... but the caps do have a very faint smell of camphor, much the same as most of my Italian pens (old, but not vintage, Omas & Tibaldi).
If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you; But if you really make them think, they'll hate you. Don Marquis US humorist (1878 - 1937)

#7 hari317

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:30

Thanks Roger.
In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#8 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 17:33

pretty nice pens :thumbup: congrats
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time






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