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My Copperplateish Alphabet


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23 replies to this topic

#1 Zed

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:11

Hello there,

since I have started posting pens for sale again - after almost a year during which I was busy doing other things - I have received quite a few requests to post the alphabet I follow in my written samples that accompany my sale posts. Well, here it is... Anybody who has studied Dick Jackson's Copperplate calligraphy book will see that the alphabet is heavily influenced by him and that any deviations are the result of my inaptness rather than originality. At the same time I would like to stress that I wrote the alphabet in speed in order to prevent myself from turning it into a calligraphy exercise. For when I write those sale samples I do so in speed too...

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Posted Image
Best, Zed

PS The alphabet was written with a Waterman #32 I recently sold, on 90gsm paper from Technic Art drawing pad (which is rather rough but relatively cheap and bleedproof) and with Diamine Florida blue ink.

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#2 Randal6393

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 16:24

Well, Zed, I would say you have thoroughly mastered the written English Roundhand. Great samples, see why your customers want to see your alphabet. If I buy one of your pens, will I be able to write as well?Posted Image

Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#3 ChuckR9

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 18:09

Very Very Nice!
Chuck

#4 vidalia11

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 19:19

Beautiful.

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#5 htom

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 21:40

Very, very nice, indeed. Now if you'd only cross the seven!

#6 andybiotic

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 03:36

Nice roundhand!
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#7 kenfraser

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:09

It's good to see Copperplate handwriting at this standard. It's particularly impressive having been written with a fountain pen. Keeping to a consistent degree of shading with everyday handwriting, isn't easy. Thanks for posting.

Ken

#8 atonce

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 20:23

Very good, how long does it take to achieve such a sophistication ?

#9 Zed

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 20:54

Thanks for all your kind words!

And regarding atonce's question concerning the time it took me to get the hang of a copperplate script... Well, it is hard to say. I was taught to write with a fountain pen and a roundhandish script already at school - though not with flexible nibs. So when I decided to teach myself copperplate script with proper shading I had plenty of head start. But it still took me at least a year to get my copperplate scrip look even and flowing and another year or two to make it look at least superficially elegant. And as you can see from the example even now some 5 years later I am unable to avoid plenty of inaccuracies and outright mistakes. Maybe that is because my everyday handwriting has always been pretty messy. As soon as I have to speed my writing up it looses all uniformity...

Best, Zed

#10 atonce

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 21:25

Thanks for all your kind words!

And regarding atonce's question concerning the time it took me to get the hang of a copperplate script... Well, it is hard to say. I was taught to write with a fountain pen and a roundhandish script already at school - though not with flexible nibs. So when I decided to teach myself copperplate script with proper shading I had plenty of head start. But it still took me at least a year to get my copperplate scrip look even and flowing and another year or two to make it look at least superficially elegant. And as you can see from the example even now some 5 years later I am unable to avoid plenty of inaccuracies and outright mistakes. Maybe that is because my everyday handwriting has always been pretty messy. As soon as I have to speed my writing up it looses all uniformity...

Best, Zed


Thank Zed for your detail answer, I always see people with very beautiful writing, but mine is just so messy that I am afraid I need to spend a lot of time to correct it from the beginning. I hope I were as persistent as you.

#11 thoppen

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 22:07

Very nice indeed!
Best regards, Tim

#12 Iann

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 08:01

I can only dream of having such an artistic hand in writing.
Just beautiful!

#13 Pip3mAn

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 10:33

Thats pretty darn awesome, epic.... Nice job mate :P

#14 rodman

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 14:51

Thanks for all your kind words!

And regarding atonce's question concerning the time it took me to get the hang of a copperplate script... Well, it is hard to say. I was taught to write with a fountain pen and a roundhandish script already at school - though not with flexible nibs. So when I decided to teach myself copperplate script with proper shading I had plenty of head start. But it still took me at least a year to get my copperplate scrip look even and flowing and another year or two to make it look at least superficially elegant. And as you can see from the example even now some 5 years later I am unable to avoid plenty of inaccuracies and outright mistakes. Maybe that is because my everyday handwriting has always been pretty messy. As soon as I have to speed my writing up it looses all uniformity...

Best, Zed


Thank Zed for your detail answer, I always see people with very beautiful writing, but mine is just so messy that I am afraid I need to spend a lot of time to correct it from the beginning. I hope I were as persistent as you.

having good handwriting is a good idea but through the years most of us tend to get sloppy with our penmanship. i guess the point i'm trying to make is that you don't have to have good everyday handwriting to turn out beautiful calligraphy. i've seen people with horrible handwriting skills turn out some of the most beautiful calligraphy ever...by the way zed, outstanding work..
rodman

#15 tdzb36

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 06:54

:rolleyes: Very very beautiful!!!

#16 supxor

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 19:28

Hello there,

since I have started posting pens for sale again - after almost a year during which I was busy doing other things - I have received quite a few requests to post the alphabet I follow in my written samples that accompany my sale posts. Well, here it is... Anybody who has studied Dick Jackson's Copperplate calligraphy book will see that the alphabet is heavily influenced by him and that any deviations are the result of my inaptness rather than originality. At the same time I would like to stress that I wrote the alphabet in speed in order to prevent myself from turning it into a calligraphy exercise. For when I write those sale samples I do so in speed too...

Posted Image
Posted Image
Best, Zed

PS The alphabet was written with a Waterman #32 I recently sold, on 90gsm paper from Technic Art drawing pad (which is rather rough but relatively cheap and bleedproof) and with Diamine Florida blue ink.
\\


Dear Zed, A few months ago, I bought a wonderful fine point Waterman from you; you might remember me.

I began work with Engrosser's Script about one month ago. Here is where I am with with such a highly disciplined and beautiful writing style. Although I am not deserving of a cigar, yet, I share this wonderful Latin adage, shared with me by a dear Croatian friend.

Translation: There are five reasons to drink: to extend hospitality to guests, for present and future occasions, because the wine is good, and for any other reason.

I used an oblique holder crafted by my new found friend, Bill Lilly, a Zebra G nib, 32 lb. HP printer paper (very smooth), and Pelican 4001 Red with gum arabic ink gifted to me from Bill Lilly.

Your script remains an inspiration to me.

Gratefully,

Bob Harrison[attachment=153402:Latin Adage.pdf]

#17 Zed

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 22:10

Hello Bob,

I am glad you still like the Waterman you bough from me and thanks for the kind words!

Your writing looks really great!

Cheers, Zed

#18 tenney

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 00:25

Very nice! Thank you.
What resource / reference did you use?
--
Glenn (love those pen posses)

#19 supxor

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 00:46

Very nice! Thank you.
What resource / reference did you use?



If your inquiry is directed toward me, I followed the work of William Lilly whose work follows the engrosser's script of W. E. Dennis. Each letter is created with multiple strokes. The engrosser, in fact, is drawing letters, rather than continuously leaving pen to paper.

#20 tenney

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 19:38

Actually my question was directed to the OP, Zed. But I found your response of your resources most interesting.
--
Glenn (love those pen posses)






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