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Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink - Dilution


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Sandy1

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 15:08

Hi,

To support the ongoing exploration of Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Ink, I have prepared written samples of that ink at various dilutions with distilled water.

Dilution is most appropriate for those who like the ink colour, but find the density is too high - especially when used with wet pens and absorbent papers.

As ever, ESSRI has a few surprises. I was surprised that the slight dilutions, 80 & 90%, did not show much effect, and that the ink kept much of its performance profile down to 33%.

There was no bleed- show-though on any of the samples.

The interval between preparing the samples and scanning was ten days, which seems to be sufficient for most of any oxidisation and interaction with paper components to take place.

As ever, I do not care to chatter about this sort of sample, but simply to post them, and see how things evolve.

The ESSRI Ink Review should be here: http://www.fountainp...registrars-ink/

Bye,
S1


Figure 1.
Grey Scale:
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Figure 2.
Lines were used instead of swabs.
Top to bottom: 90, 66, 33, 50, 66, 80, 90, 100, 80, 50%.
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WRITTEN SAMPLES - Moby Dick
Ruling 8mm.
Resolution is 200 dpi.

Two pens were used: a Rosetta Magellan + Schmidt g-p steel B nib; and the Waterman 52 1/2 V with a No.2 14K flexi nib.

Figure 3.
Paper: HPJ1124
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Figure 4.
Paper: Rhodia
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Figure 5.
Paper: Rhodia.
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Figure 6.
Paper: Staples 20 lb.
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OTHER STUFF:
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HiRes Scans - 300 dpi:
Paper: Rhodia.

33%
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50%
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66%
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80%
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90%
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100%
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Flexi nib [mis]adventures:

50%
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66%
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80%
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-30-


Tags: Ecclesiastical Stationery Supplies Registrars Fountain Pen Ink ESSRI Dilution Sandy1


Edited by Sandy1, 03 January 2012 - 15:13.

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


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#2 Ad_Astra

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 22:53

Does diluting IG inks help overcome the dryness and better the flowrate any?
Non est ad astra mollis e terris via. - Seneca

#3 Sandy1

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 18:07

Does diluting IG inks help overcome the dryness and better the flowrate any?


Hi,

Adding water dilutes the % of lubricant and surfacant per unit volume, so dryness often increases and the flow rate decreases.

It is apparent on the samples from the Waterman 52 1/2 V flexi nib that the flow rate is decreased - the number of incidents where railroading occurs increases as dilution increases. So if a person liked the lower densities, then they would be less likely to achieve such wide lines through flexing the nib. In such cases, a Stub-shaped flexi nib may be called upon to give line-width variation by virtue of shape of the nib as well as flex of the nib.

Bye,
S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.


#4 amberleadavis

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 22:03

Sandy, I just received a recommendation from BoBo Olson about this ink --- what are your thoughts on adding a little glycerin? Would it help? Hurt?

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#5 The Good Captain

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 22:27

Sandy, I just received a recommendation from BoBo Olson about this ink --- what are your thoughts on adding a little glycerin? Would it help? Hurt?

I don't know about this but I have gone off the ESSRI for a while. It was getting a little oily in the bottle and although I've hardly used it at all I reckon I'll give it a miss. Actually I prefer the Salix effect on the whole and Mb Midnight Blue for a darker colour. 4001 will suffice for anything in between.

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#6 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:20

I'm happy Sandy that you are giving that Waterman's flexible nib a chance.

My favorite letter with a more flexible nib is a capital L. It allows me to be as fancy as the nib is flexible.

I'm still at the stage of Drawing fancy letters when I try. When drawing you have to slow down.
Other than that just write normal and let the pressure come on it's own. It will, the first letter, the last letter, crossing a t. I'm not the one to be giving advice on fancy writing really.

Grab easy full flex 'no name ' Pewado war pen (no cap band-just rills) with a easy full flex Degussa F nib...find out the pen is too big for the bottle. :headsmack:
Inkwell, fill pen, empty inkwell back into the bottle.

Yep, for fancy, got to slow down and add pressure.

I like 'Let it Be'.
Let it Be
The capital L gets some fancy, the open letter t gets a bit fat on the inside down stroke(looks like a small l that has been crossed), the capital B has a bit of pressure and the following e also.
Then again, I can't write worth a dam.
But I do like how the ink crosses the L when I go for a full English mustache when the second loop (bottom) crosses the L.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 04 April 2013 - 11:22.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 







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