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Mabie Todd Swan No 2


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8 replies to this topic

#1 olivier78860

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 14:48

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#2 MikeW

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 15:02

When I bought my first Swan (a blue snakeskin), it was love at first write. Since then, I have collected a significant number of them. In addition to being great writing pens, they come in such a wide variety of models and beautiful colours.

Thanks for the terrific review of a great pen with a wonderful nib (and the handwriting is not too shabby either!).

MikeW

 

"In the land of fountain pens, the one with the sweetest nib reigns supreme!"

 

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#3 Mauricio

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 15:04

Great review Olivier. it looks like fairly crisp chasing in your pen. I really like the larger writings in the second picture, the first and last line. They nicely represent the capabilities of the nib. Well done!
Tu Amigo!
Mauricio Aguilar

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#4 olivier78860

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 15:14

Thanks for the nice comments. As a left-handed writer, I really have problems taking something good out of stub or italic nibs. I'm pretty sure someone right-handed would do marvels with such a nib.
It turns out I'm starting to have a few Mabie Todd pens, mostly eye-droppers, and I kind of like them a lot.

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#5 richardandtracy

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 15:16

I bekieve that your pen is much earlier than you have declared. I have a UK made one (reviewed here: http://www.fountainp...edropper-c1915/ ) and from the research I did on it the date could be any time between 1910 & 1920.

The condition of yours is superb compared to mine - treasure it.
It's lovely to use, however, I ALWAYS get inky fingers with mine, just one of those things with a pen of that age.

Lovely review & I wish my writing was as good.

Regards,

Richard.

#6 olivier78860

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 16:08

I longly hesitated for the datation. First thing that made me hesitate was the feed, as I thought there were only split-feeds eye-droppers from MT in the 1910s.
Secondly, this seems to be a plastic pen. The other ones I have are in hard rubber and are definitely not as shiny or preserved as this one, even if they are in a good state. But maybe they changed their production in these years.
I'm definitely not an expert, so I might be completely wrong. I have a SF1 with a lever, and a section that looks a bit like that, from the second half the the 1910s, that could give me references for a comparison, but it's in Edinburgh at the moment, for a well-deserved youth cure ;)

And sorry about the duplicate review, I should have checked before posting.

Edited by olivier78860, 07 December 2011 - 16:09.

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#7 richardandtracy

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 16:40

It's always useful to have lots of people's ideas on as many pens as possible. The reason is that nobody can write all the possible information & views about a pen that other people may want to know.
Also with these very old pens there is a huge amount of variation in the nibs, so one may be flexy & the next almost rigid, and it's worth knowing the range that you may encounter.

Regards,

Richard.




#8 olivier78860

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 11:13

*Update* The pen was dated by Mr Eric Wilson, aka Eckiethump, and according to him, it's a very well preserved pen from the 1910s. We could even say, because of the imprint, between 1914 and 1918. So, good guess Richard !

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#9 richardandtracy

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 14:11

It's nice to have a second opinion on the age of the pen, but whatever the age, it looks glorious & needs to be cherished. I hope you enjoy it.

Regards,

Richard.









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