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Delta Via Vento (Red One)


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#1 jandrese

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 22:54

Up until recently (see QM2's review here), I don't think that this pen was reviewed in these pages. For a Delta it may be under appreciated. Like the Pelikan 101N, I think this pen has a wonderful vintage flair, and that Italian red color, wow!

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What is a Via Vento you ask? According to Wiki whatever it is this.

"Via Veneto is one of the most famous (and expensive) streets in Rome, Italy. The official name is via Vittorio Veneto, after the Battle of Vittorio Veneto. Federico Fellini's classic 1960 film La Dolce Vita was mostly centered around the Via Veneto area. This made the street famous in the 1960s–1970s and turned it into a center for upmarket cafes and shops. Following a period of stagnation in the 1980s the street has now found a new life. Today some of Rome's best hotels are located there.[1][2]

Via Veneto is home to the famous Café de Paris and Harry's Bar, immortalised in Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, as well known haunts for celebrities in Rome."

Interesting, perhaps this pen can find new life too. It really is a great pen that, for Delta anyway, is not too expensive. In both black and red it looks fabulous, and it even comes with diamonds and a lever filler. Mine is cartridge/converter filling. Boring I know, but it works well. The barrel only accommodates one of those crazy, weird, short Delta converters though. While my converter is intact, the new Via Vento's I've seen have normal converters with part of the black plastic twisty ends lopped off so as to fit in the barrel. That is too cheap Delta!

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The size and weight of the pen is great for long writing sessions, and the large grip section is very comfortable despite there being a step down where the trim ring is. The white dome tassie, the the white cap ring are casein, which is a plastic made from milk protein. I've heard that casein may dissolve upon long exposure to water, which is probably not a concern here.

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The stock nib is good, but not super wonderful. It is firm and somewhat smallish, but is proportional to the pen. I had mine turned into a crispy cursive italic medium by Pendemonium, so, I can't comment much on the stock nib. The modified nib is crazy awesome though. Extra fine cross strokes and perfect vertical medium lines are smoothly delivered. Ink flow is spot on, not too juicy, not too dry.

This is a great, medium sized, retro looking, understated (well, not in red) pen that many would be very happy with.

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#2 raging.dragon

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 05:41

Is that real casein? Considering how easy it would be to damage real casein when cleaning with water, I almost hope it's a casein look alike. For example, there's a widely available celluloid which looks almost exactly like casein:

http://www.americana...oid/Ivory.shtml

Edited by raging.dragon, 21 November 2011 - 05:51.


#3 jandrese

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 14:07

Is that real casein? Considering how easy it would be to damage real casein when cleaning with water, I almost hope it's a casein look alike. For example, there's a widely available celluloid which looks almost exactly like casein:

http://www.americana...oid/Ivory.shtml



According to Delta it is real casein. It may be lacquered. I've had my Via Vento for several years now, and have not had any problems. I don't soak the cap though. As I recall, the imitation casein/ivory in the link above is relatively new. While not sure of the born on date, I believe the Via Vento predates this material.

#4 raging.dragon

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 17:54

Is that real casein? Considering how easy it would be to damage real casein when cleaning with water, I almost hope it's a casein look alike. For example, there's a widely available celluloid which looks almost exactly like casein:

http://www.americana...oid/Ivory.shtml



According to Delta it is real casein. It may be lacquered. I've had my Via Vento for several years now, and have not had any problems. I don't soak the cap though. As I recall, the imitation casein/ivory in the link above is relatively new. While not sure of the born on date, I believe the Via Vento predates this material.


Lacquered casein would make sense too. It's also possible that modern casein is made differently from and has better water resistance than, the vintage casein.

#5 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:23

delta nibs never did it for me unless it were the ones that were found on the nettuno 1911 limited editions
Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#6 breaker

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 16:50

nice review and pics!
thanks!
Cogito ergo sum






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